Earth Citizens Perspective
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Earth Citizens Perspective
Developments affecting the environment worldwide
Curated by Bert Guevara
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Save our Food Biodiversity - Slow food ("vs Fast food, a choice for long life and biodiversity")

Save our Food Biodiversity - Slow food ("vs Fast food, a choice for long life and biodiversity") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Save our Food Biodiversity
Slow food
Biodiversity is our insurance policy for the future, allowing plants and animals to adapt to climatic changes, attacks by parasites and disease, or the unexpected.

Biodiversity is our insurance policy for the future, allowing plants and animals to adapt to climatic changes, attacks by parasites and disease, or the unexpected. A system that is biologically varied is endowed with the antibodies to counter dangerous organisms and restore its own equilibrium. A system based on a limited number of varieties, on the other hand, is very fragile. The small-scale farmers, shepherds, fishers that know and respect the fragile balance of nature are the earth’s last true custodians. If biodiversity disappears, together with wild flora and fauna, many domesticated plants and animal breeds will also disappear. Today 60% of the world’s food is based on just three cereals: wheat, rice and corn. Not on the thousands of rice varieties selected by farmers, once cultivated in India and China, or on the thousands of varieties of corn that used to be grown in Mexico, but on the few hybrid varieties selected and sold to farmers by a handful of multinationals. 
Slow Food’s mission has always been focused on the defense of biodiversity: domesticated, edible biodiversity. Meaning not just pandas and polar bears, but also Gascon chickens and Alpago lambs; not just edelweiss and rainforests, but also violet asparagus from Albenga and traditional Swiss plum orchards. Biodiversity is not some abstract concept. It’s all around us, and it’s endangered too. 

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Aid for Cordova: Pay-to-plant mangroves - Inquirer.net ("too little; small relief")

Aid for Cordova: Pay-to-plant mangroves - Inquirer.net ("too little; small relief") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Aid for Cordova: Pay-to-plant mangroves
Inquirer.net
The Bureau of Food and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) started distributing mangrove propagules yesterday as an alternative livelihood for fisherfolk affected by the oil spill from the sunken MV St.

Families in Cordova town were asked to replant mangroves and get paid for it.

The Bureau of Food and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) started distributing mangrove propagules yesterday as an alternative livelihood for fisherfolk affected by the oil spill from the sunken MV St. Thomas Aquinas.

BFAR Assistant Regional Director Allan Poquita said the government will pay P2 each for potting a propagule in a temporary nursery, P3 per propagule planted and P1 for maintenance if it survives after one year.

For the mangrove planting, BFAR is giving 105,000 propagules for at least 10 barangays affected by the oil spill.

Unable to go out to sea to fish, Cordova families have been deprived of their livelihood for the past five days.

The BFAR will also give three-day’s supply of gasoline for those with motorboats. hit.

For marginal fishermen who use paddle boats, BFAR said other alternatives have to be explored.

Wives of the fishermen will also receive one kilo of squid balls, one kilo of fishballs and two kilos of cooking oil as starting capital for a small vending business.

About 5,000 fishermen in the town have lost their livelihood due to the oil spill.

The oil slick affected the town’s 15-kilometer shoreline, destroying over 300 hectares of mangroves.

The oil slick has also affected cultured and wild crabs, prawns, sea weeds and bakasi (eel) which the town is known for.

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Political Crisis, Population Growth Threaten Biodiversity - AllAfrica.com ("man-made threats")

Political Crisis, Population Growth Threaten Biodiversity - AllAfrica.com ("man-made threats") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Political Crisis, Population Growth Threaten Biodiversity
AllAfrica.com
The Indian Ocean island of Madagascar is a biodiversity hotspot with 80 per cent of its animal species unique to the country.

It's a protected area known for its waterfalls and wildlife and it's home to the world's largest species of lemur, the Indri Indri.

The park is a tourist magnet but Madagascar's rapidly growing population is putting more pressure on the forest.

It is under threat due to a rise in slash-and-burn agriculture, where people burn down large areas, often rich in flora and fauna, to clear land to plant crops.

Slash-and-burn agriculture is not the only threat to the island's natural resources. The ongoing political turmoil and increased poverty led to an upsurge in the logging of hardwoods and illegal mining.

"The problem got worse since the beginning of the [political] crisis," says deputy managing director Herijaona Randriamanantenasoa. "We are not talking about dozens of people cutting wood in the forest but actually hundreds or even thousands of people. Insecurity prevails in these areas."

The export of hardwoods is illegal here but the interim government has failed to enforce the law.

"There is a weakness in law enforcement because of corruption and because of the power of this illegal network of traffickers," says Andry Andriamanga Ralamboson, the national coordinator of environmentalist coalition Vohary Gasy.


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Myanmar's mangrove forests will be wiped out by 2015 - Experts - Eleven Myanmar

Myanmar's mangrove forests will be wiped out by 2015 - Experts - Eleven Myanmar | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Myanmar's mangrove forests will be wiped out by 2015 - Experts Eleven Myanmar Myanmar's mangrove forests will be completely wiped out by 2015 if there are no efforts to conserve them, according to experts at a local forum on mangrove conservation...

The forests are located mostly in the Ayeyarwady delta region, coastal parts of Tanintharyi and Rakhine regions in Myanmar.

"Our ministry has plans to create necessary policies, law, official organisations for the preservation of natural resources including mangrove forests. The areas of mangrove forests have dropped as the country's social economy changed fundamentally," said Win Tun, the Minister for Environment, Conservation and Forestry.

The minister pointed out some of the reasons for the loss of mangrove forests, saying the country has no national policy concerning land usage in those areas. He also added that relevant policies are required for long-term survival of the mangroves.

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Corporate Shareholders Are Getting Nervous About How Climate Change Will Affect Their Investments

Corporate Shareholders Are Getting Nervous About How Climate Change Will Affect Their Investments | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Shareholders and large pension funds are getting skittish about how climate change could threaten the companies they've invested in.

Ceres’ numbers show that in this year’s recently-concluded round of shareholder meetings, 110 shareholder resolutions were filed at 94 different U.S companies, related to everything from climate change, to hydraulic fracturing disclosure, flaring, the future environmental and financial risks of fossil fuel exploration, and environmental sustainability.

According to The Daily Climate investor resolutions concerned with climate change have shot up from about 30 ten years ago to over 100 last year. And the year before that, in 2011, in the run up to the COP 17 climate talks, international investors representing $20 trillion in assets worldwide sent a letter calling for “renewable energy, energy efficiency and decarbonisation” policies to create new jobs and businesses, spark innovation, and provide a framework for sustainable long-term economic growth.

One of the two issues that came up the most in the filings was a lack of transparency regarding company exposure to climate change risks — “without qualitative reporting, shareholders cannot be assured that a company is taking real steps to minimize these risks,” the head of a major investment fund pointed out. The other issue was the possibility that fossil fuel companies could be left unable to exploit their reserves if governments actually take the steps necessary to rein in greenhouse gas emissions. A report earlier this year from the Carbon Tracker Initiative and the London School of Economics estimated that $6 trillion could be wasted purchasing oil, coal, and natural gas reserves depending on the police choices made by the international community.

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So, The North Pole Is Actually A Lake Right Now

So, The North Pole Is Actually A Lake Right Now | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
The North Pole probably looks a bit different than you would expect right now. Because, at this very moment, it's actually a lake.

July is usually the warmest month in the area, but temperatures were 1 to 3 degrees Celsius above average this year. The shallow lake you see at the pole is made of meltwater sitting on top of a layer of ice, according to the observatory.

Arctic sea ice has become a noticeable victim of climate change. The area of ice cover expands and contracts every year with the change in seasons, but last summer's minimum extent was the lowest on record and this year's maximum winter coverage was thesixth-lowest since satellite observations began in the 1970s.

 

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Biodiversity suffering from widespread agriculture ("a need for land use plan?") - The Copenhagen Post

Biodiversity suffering from widespread agriculture ("a need for land use plan?") - The Copenhagen Post | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Biodiversity suffering from widespread agriculture
The Copenhagen Post
“The consequence of having such a large, effective and intensive agriculture industry is that biodiversity suffers as a result,” Agger told Information newspaper.

“The consequence of having such a large, effective and intensive agriculture industry is that biodiversity suffers as a result,” Agger told Information newspaper. “Over half of Denmark’s land is ploughed and sprayed every year. That kills the natural vegetation. That is why agriculture takes the vast, vast majority of the blame for the poor biodiversity.”

In a summary, the government admits that biodiversity is suffering in Denmark but that central planning of land use can turn the tide.

“Biodiversity is declining both in Denmark and globally,” the proposal states. “It is thought that around a fifth of the 32,000 species in Denmark are threatened. The cause is a reduction of habitat that can especially be linked to changes in agricultural methods and forestry.”


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Philippine Information Agency | Phl biodiversity depleting - DENR official ("disappearing?")

Philippine Information Agency | Phl biodiversity depleting - DENR official ("disappearing?") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Philippine Information Agency, the development communication arm of the Philippine government, member of the Presidential Communications Group


"Recent assessment made by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) revealed that of the 24 percent of the total 44,000 square-kilometers of coral reefs of good condition in the Philippines, only two percent remain in excellent condition. 
"Mussaendra G. Tee, chief, Biodiversity Conservation and Management Section, Protected Areas Wildlife Coastal Zone Management (PAWCZMS), DENR-9 presented during the weekly PIA Media Forum last Thursday that of the original 450,000 hectares of mangrove forests in the country only 149,000 remain untouched. 
“But based on the 1995 DENR statistics, these mangrove areas were further reduced to only 117,700 hectares,” Tee added. ...
“The country had an estimated 17 million hectares of forest lands in 1935, but now only six million remain intact and only 800,000 hectares of these are old growth,” she reported. 
“The Philippines is one of the 18 countries in the world identified as containing 60-70 percent of the world’s biodiversity next only to Brazil, Columbia and Indonesia,” Tee said. 
According to Tee, the Philippines ranks fifth in the world in terms of plant species, numbering to more than 8,000; and fourth in bird endemism registering 579 species of bird of which 395 are known to nest and breed in the country. The country is also fifth in mammal endemism. 
“The factors that threaten our biodiversity are attributed to man-made and natural disasters such as logging, fires, land conversion, destructive fishing, encroachment/occupancy in protected areas, siltation, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and typhoons,” 

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Pesticide Free Farming ("join the movement to smart agriculture, it's more profitable")

Pesticide Free Farming ("join the movement to smart agriculture, it's more profitable") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
A revolutionary experiment in sustainable agriculture is showing impressive results in south India.

Around two million farmers in the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh have ditched chemical pesticides in favour of natural repellants and fertilisers, as part of a growing eco-agriculture movement.

The sustainable techniques are spread through a network of women's self-help groups, and over 10 percent of the state’s farmland is now being cultivated without chemical pesticides.

Farmers make natural pest repellents from ingredients such as neem tree leaves, chilli and cow urine - which is over 70 percent cheaper than using chemicals.

They also promote beneficial insects, use compost, and plant crops that fix nitrogen into the soil. Since it began in 2004 the scheme has improved soil health and biodiversity, reduced costs and upped yields. 

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3 signs of progress in curbing the illegal wood trade ("saving the little that's left")

3 signs of progress in curbing the illegal wood trade ("saving the little that's left") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
As illegal logging rates decline, companies and cities are stepping up to control their supply chains and use only legally sourced wood.

Three major themes came up in our conversations, indicating that a shift may be happening in the global forest trade:

1. Legality requirements are now mainstream

2. Proactive companies are taking control of their supply chains

3. Cities are taking action

Despite the progress made, illegal logging remains a major problem. While the growing support for legally sourced hardwoods is encouraging, it’s important that more cities, countries and companies join the global leaders that already have emerged. Their involvement can help ensure a better future for the world’s forests and people.

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Hong Kong's noise pollution needs taking seriously ("how's noise in your city?") - S.China Morning Post

Hong Kong's noise pollution needs taking seriously ("how's noise in your city?") - S.China Morning Post | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Hong Kong's noise pollution needs taking seriously
South China Morning Post
Noise pollution in Hong Kong needs no research to show how serious the problem is.

Noise pollution in Hong Kong needs no research to show how serious the problem is. The pounding din of jackhammers, blaring of horns by agitated drivers, incessant drilling from renovations next door, loud phone conversation on public transport - the evidence is everywhere. However unpleasant it is, noise is considered part of city life, something that has to be put up with in a busy place like ours. Although the exposure to noise is arguably less damaging than breathing filthy air, that does not mean the problem does not warrant public attention and improvement. Excessive noise can lead to more than impaired hearing and insomnia. The need for more action is just as pressing.

Full appraisal of how serious the problem is will be a helpful step. This can be achieved by collating and analysing the noise-related complaints filed by the public. A designer in New York has produced a map of the city's noise topography, based on noise complaint details available on the city's Open Data website. Lauded as a work of art because of its visual impact, the project showed a striking disparity between rich and poor districts, which suggested noise in areas for the rich was handled by the authorities more seriously.

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Lab testing on chimps may end as U.S. moves to declare them all 'endangered'

Lab testing on chimps may end as U.S. moves to declare them all 'endangered' | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Under proposed changes, it will be illegal to injure or kill any chimpanzee.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently announced plans to broaden the 'endangered species' classification to all chimpanzees, effectively banning all institutions from abusing or exploiting them. Under the proposed changes, it would become illegal to harm, harass, kill, or injure any chimp, as well as place strict limitations on how they could be transported or sold. At the moment, the U.S. is the only developed country where chimps are used as laboratory test animals -- exposed to diseases and subjected to painful operations for years on end, often without ever seeing sunlight. Their inclusion on the Endangered Species list would make such practices illegal in nearly all cases.
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The dense mangroves swamp at Nasese is slowly dissappearing. ("Tourism to blame?") - Fiji Times

The dense mangroves swamp at Nasese is slowly dissappearing. ("Tourism to blame?") - Fiji Times | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it

The dense mangroves swamp at Nasese is slowly dissappearing.
They are over-harvested for firewood, suffer the enroaching reclamation works to make way for developments, housing and used as rubbish dumps.

Apart from physically protecting the coastlines, they are valuable sources of many different types of food, including fish, crabs, prawns, shellfish, not to forget seeds that are also consumed in many parts of the country.

The regional project manager for the International Union for Conservation of Nature, Dr Milika Sorby, said the physical presence of mangroves along the coastlines and rivers also provided the first line of defence against cyclones, high winds and storm surges.

"Tourist-related projects are in demand. Developments such as Denarau in Nadi, resorts and industrial developments provided employment and promoted economic growth, these have been successful."

However, she said a cost benefit analysis and proper environment assessment should be done before mangrove conversions.

While mangrove conversions were conducted in certain areas, she said some should be left alone.

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Environment Canada issues heat warning - Globalnews.ca ("even they are not spared from heat")

Environment Canada issues heat warning - Globalnews.ca ("even they are not spared from heat") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Environment Canada issues heat warning
Globalnews.ca
WINNIPEG – The humidex in southern Manitoba will climb above 40 this afternoon, Environment Canada warns.

The humidex in southern Manitoba will climb above 40 this afternoon, Environment Canada warns.

A humidex higher than 40 can cause great discomfort and people should avoid exertion, Environment Canada says.

The humidex is a combined measure of humidity and temperature that reflects how hot the air feels, much the way windchill factors in wind to calculate how cold the air feels.

“An extremely high humidex reading can be defined as one that is over 40. In such conditions, all unnecessary activity should be curtailed,” the Environment Canada website says.

“If working outdoors is an absolute necessity, drink plenty of liquids and take frequent rest breaks.”

Extremely high humidex readings are rare in Canada, except in the southern regions of Ontario, Manitoba and Quebec, Environment Canada says.

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Oakland Zoo celebrates opening a 'Biodiversity Center' - KTVU San Francisco ("Phil needs this too")

Oakland Zoo celebrates opening a 'Biodiversity Center' - KTVU San Francisco ("Phil needs this too") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Oakland Zoo celebrates opening a 'Biodiversity Center' KTVU San Francisco The Oakland Zoo just opened its new Biodiversity Center, a breeding, research, and education facility devoted to the conservation of endangered and threatened animals, plants...

 

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Why the World Bank Is Taking On Climate Change ("poverty linked to climate change, WB admits")

Why the World Bank Is Taking On Climate Change ("poverty linked to climate change, WB admits") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
The organization believes that increased drought, extreme storms, and rising sea levels are significant threats to economies worldwide.
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WWF hails Ilocos fisher as 'environment hero' - Inquirer.net ("Mabuhay ka Francisco!")

WWF hails Ilocos fisher as 'environment hero' - Inquirer.net ("Mabuhay ka Francisco!") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
WWF hails Ilocos fisher as 'environment hero' Inquirer.net MANILA, Philippines—For saving a dolphin trapped in a fishing net, a 63-year-old fisherman from Ilocos Norte has been named the latest “Hero of the Environment” by the World Wildlife Fund...

Francisco Vergara, who alerted authorities after he discovered an adult rough-toothed dolphin (Steno bredanensis) enmeshed in a fishing net in Badoc town, was recognized by WWF-Philippines for “coming to the aid of a distressed and dying animal.”

Setting out at sea on his tiny boat in the wee hours of June 18, the fisherman came across the animal struggling for life in waters between the villages of Pagsanaan Sur and Pagsanaan Norte, the environmentalist group said in a news release.

“The senior citizen wasted no time alerting authorities which quickly pooled resources to release the animal by 9:45 a.m.,” WWF-Philippines said. The dolphin appeared healthy and strong by the time of its release, according to the statement.

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Alberta Tar Sands Blowout Threatens Boreal Forest, Wasn't Disclosed Until ... - De Smog Blog (blog)

Alberta Tar Sands Blowout Threatens Boreal Forest, Wasn't Disclosed Until ... - De Smog Blog (blog) | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Alberta Tar Sands Blowout Threatens Boreal Forest, Wasn't Disclosed Until ...

Tar sands oil has been spilling in Alberta’s boreal forests for months, and according to a government scientist, neither industry nor government knows how to stop it. Four "oil blowouts"  left 34 tons of vegetation covered in oil, dozens of animals dead, and two-foot-high coats of oil on tree trunks.
So far, cleanup efforts have removed 26,000 barrels of bitumen mixed with surface water - at least 4,500 barrels of pure bitumen in total. The impacts on groundwater are unknown.

First reported in the Toronto Star (with photos) and Mother Jones, the information was leaked by a Canadian government scientist who wished to remain anonymous for fear of losing his job.

According to the scientist,

"Everybody (at the company and in government) is freaking out about this. We don’t understand what happened. Nobody really understands how to stop it from leaking, or if they do they haven’t put the measures into place."

The spills are located at Canadian Natural Resources, Ltd.’s Primrose bitumen emulsion site in Cold Lake, Alberta. Two of the underground spills began in May, but the Alberta Energy Regulator kept the information silent for nine weeks. A third spill, reported on June 8, is believed to have been leaking for months. None of the previous three spills were reported to the public until the fourth spill on July 18.

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Climate Change Will Alter the Soil That Feeds Us ("cold-loving bacteria losing out") - Climate Central

Climate Change Will Alter the Soil That Feeds Us ("cold-loving bacteria losing out") - Climate Central | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Climate Change Will Alter the Soil That Feeds Us Climate Central “By using our data with current climate models, we can predict that in 50 years, the cyanobacterium that fares better in warm temperatures will push the cold-loving one off our map,”...
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Gap growing between supply and demand for organic foods - Fox News

Gap growing between supply and demand for organic foods - Fox News | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Gap growing between supply and demand for organic foods
Fox News
The U.S.

The Farm Belt isn't going organic fast enough to keep up with surging consumer demand, forcing makers of organic foods from milk to deli meats to look abroad for key commodities while struggling to recruit skeptical farmers at home.

The U.S. is the world's largest producer and exporter of corn and soybeans, but organic supplies, which are used largely as animal feed for production of organic meat and dairy, are hard to come by here. Federal data show organic food producers are turning to China and India for organic soybeans, as total U.S. imports of those kinds of beans doubled last year and could surpass $100 million in value this year.

Food companies say fewer corn and soybeans farmers are adding organic acres, with some even returning to pesticides and processed fertilizer after trying organic production.

"We are not keeping up. You have seen a slowdown in the transition of acres," said George Siemon, chief executive of Organic Valley, the largest cooperative of organic farmers in the U.S. Limited new supplies, he added, mean its dairies pay higher prices for feed, making producers less profitable as organic retail prices can only climb so high.

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Let's Hatch a Plan to Save the World's Birds Before it's Too Late ("calling bird-lovers!")

Let's Hatch a Plan to Save the World's Birds Before it's Too Late ("calling bird-lovers!") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
We can't live without birds. Beyond being fascinating and beautiful, they play a crucial role in keeping the world habitable for all life, including people.

Sadly, we're to blame for the current plight of birds. The report shows industrial-scale agriculture, logging and invasive species are the gravest immediate dangers. It also concludes climate change is an "emerging and increasingly serious threat to species" and "often exacerbates existing threats." Among other problems, a warming planet changes migration and nesting schedules, hindering birds' ability to find insects to eat. It also damages habitat. ...

While the BirdLife study identifies climate change as a major threat, it also notes the challenge in balancing environmental factors in energy-project development. Critics oppose wind power because of potential harm to birds, but bird deaths from windmills are minimal compared to those caused by fossil fuels, climate change, pesticides, highrise buildings, automobile collisions and house cats. A National University of Singapore study shows fossil fuel power generation kills 17 times as many birds per gigawatt-hour of electricity as wind power. And wind farm problems can be overcome with proper siting and improved design. In the Rift Valley/Red Sea flyway, an important area for birds migrating between Eurasia and Africa, BirdLife developed research materials and a web-based tool to map flight patterns and identify places where wind installations should be avoided to keep birds safer.

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Climate-smart coffee farming in Uganda ("outsmarting climate change") - video - The Guardian

The Guardian
Climate-smart coffee farming in Uganda - video
The Guardian
Thanks to rising temperatures and poor farming practices, smallholder coffee farmers working on the slopes of Mount Elgon in south-east Uganda have seen their yields fall.

Now a public-private partnership is teaching farmers better soil-management and how to adapt to climate change in order to safeguard their livelihoods.

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Will climate change make Florida uninsurable? ("what about more vulnerable cities like Manila?)

Will climate change make Florida uninsurable? ("what about more vulnerable cities like Manila?) | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
An industry report says some regions of the globe may pose too high a risk.
On the same day that President Obama announced his new climate change proposal, a report from an insurance industry trade group urged action to counter global warming for a different reason. The report states that climate change factors could make it impossible to issue catastrophic risk insurance in some regions, such as Florida and the U.K. Published by the Geneva Association, "Warming of the Oceans and Implication for the (Re)insurance Industry" reports that global warming “could create a risk environment that is uninsurable in some regions." Global warming has led to a higher number of Atlantic storms, but houses and buildings may not be built to endure the increasingly severe weather. According to The Weather Channel, seven of the ten most costly storms in the U.S. have impacted Florida. Amos Zeeberg writes for Nautilus that despite this gloomy forecast, the group takes on an activist tone: "Rendering an entire U.S. state or nation 'uninsurable' is a pretty bad possibility for the people who live there—and for insurance companies that want them as customers. The report also takes a notably activist tone in encouraging the industry to help prevent this kind of outcome."
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102-Year-Old Ship in Sydney Became A Floating Forest

102-Year-Old Ship in Sydney Became A Floating Forest | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
For all those whose heart starts beating faster when they see something old and abandoned, Homebush Bay in Sydney is the place to visit.
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MGB suspends Surigao Norte firm's mineral processing ("spilling of mine tailings imminent")

MGB suspends Surigao Norte firm's mineral processing ("spilling of mine tailings imminent") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
The agency found a 'tension crack' in the miner's tailings storage facility in the province
Because of the imminent danger posed by the situation, MGB ordered Greenstone to immediately stop gold ore mineral processing in the contract area under Mineral Production and Sharing Agreement No. 184-2002-XIII. The agency ordered Greenstone's mineral processing suspended until remedial measures are instituted. These measures should be certified by a third-party expert and validated by the Environmental Management Bureau. The company should also submit a report on the remedial measures undertaken within 3 days of receipt of the order and every week thereafter until the stability and integrity of the tailings facility is restored. Greenstone operates the Sianna gold project in the municipalities of Tubod and Mainit.
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