Earth Citizens Pe...
Follow
Find
12.2K views | +2 today
 
Scooped by Bert Guevara
onto Earth Citizens Perspective
Scoop.it!

Reduce Food Waste in 5 Easy Steps

Reduce Food Waste in 5 Easy Steps | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
The U.S. generates more than 34 million tons of food waste each year, according to the EPA. Sure, you can compost perished produce, leftovers and food scraps.

Hindi pwede bale-walain ang dami ng nasasayang na pagkain, kahit sa mga mahihirap na bansa, hindi lamang sa Amerika. Narito ang simpleng mga paalala sa ating mga kababayan. Huwag aksayahin ang pagkain.

more...
No comment yet.

From around the web

Earth Citizens Perspective
Developments affecting the environment worldwide
Curated by Bert Guevara
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

PNP, pinarangalan ng UN sa environmental protection | Balita - Tagalog Newspaper Tabloid

PNP, pinarangalan ng UN sa environmental protection | Balita - Tagalog Newspaper Tabloid | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
-*+Ginawaran ng United Nations ng parangal ang Philippine National Police (PNP) dahil sa malaking kontribusyon nito sa pagpapatupad ng mga batas pang-kalikasan sa Asya.

Sinabi ni Deputy Director General Leonardo Espina, officer-in-charge ng PNP, na ito ang unang pagkakataon na ginawaran ng UN ang pitong bansa, kabilang ang Pilipinas, ng Asia Environmental Enforcement Award (AEEA) dahil sa pinaigting na kampanya ng PNP Maritime Group sa pagbibigay-proteksiyon sa kalikasan.

“I congratulate the Maritime Group for a job well done as they did not only brought home honors for themselves and the PNP but for the country as well,” pahayag ni Espina.

Sa ilalim ng United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP), binigyan ng parangal ang PNP Maritime Group bilang resulta ng 1,500 operasyon nito laban sa mga lumalabag sa fisheries and wildlife law, na umabot sa 3,000 ang naaresto at nakakolekta ang gobyerno ng US$300,000 multa mula sa mga pasaway na mangingisda.

Dalawa sa limang Asyano ang nakatanggap ng award mula sa UN na kinabibilangan nina Senior Supt. Jonathan Albang, deputy director for operations ng Maritime Group.

Sinaluduhan ng UN si Ablang sa pagsusulong niya sa pagtatatag ng mga Marine Protected Area, pangangalap at pagsasanay ng mga residente mula sa 679 na lokal na komunidad bilang Marine Protected Area Guard, at pagbuo sa SMS public hotline na nakatulong nang malaki sa pagsugpo sa ilegal ng pangingisda at iba pang paglabag sa environmental law.

Bert Guevara's insight:

The Maritime Group of the PNP made over 1500 operations, 3000 arrests and $300,000 in fines for illegal fishing in Marine Protected Areas, and received a U.N. Asia Environment Enforcement Award.

Senior Supt. Jonathan Albang was also commended for his efforts in establishing Marine Protected Areas and training of volunteers from 679 communities to become part of the Marine Protected Area Guard.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Zambia: Wildlife poachers trade guns for gardens | Al Jazeera America ("winning the war with jobs")

Zambia: Wildlife poachers trade guns for gardens | Al Jazeera America ("winning the war with jobs") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
A project to find alternative livelihoods for former hunters suggests the limits of a purely law-enforcement approach

But today, there are no bullets in their guns. The men, and scores of others in the Luangwa Valley, have given up poaching for farming. They’ve repurposed their weapons by loading them with a nonlethal mix of crushed chili and gunpowder. They use the spicy blasts to drive off animals that come to raid their fields.

As poaching has reached dire levels across the continent, some countries have instituted “shoot to kill” policies to stop poachers, while private anti-poaching militias patrol swaths of land in others. At the same time, governments and international law-enforcement agencies are working to get tough on wildlife crime by coordinating efforts and stiffening penalties. Yet some conservationists argue that the international response has been weighted too heavily toward law enforcement, and is overlooking the role that communities who live closest to wildlife can play in protecting these species. A hard-line approach to poaching can alienate or even harm these would-be allies; a recent crackdown in Tanzania was halted after accusations that anti-poaching troops murdered, raped and tortured innocent people. 

Individual farmers, who organize themselves into producer groups and cooperatives, adopt sustainable techniques — they fertilize with compost, incorporate trees into their farms and minimize tilling. Those who follow the guidelines earn a premium price, typically 10 to 20 percent higher than the market rate. To help them comply, and improve food security, COMACO gives loans of seeds, technical assistance and, in some cases, the materials to build poultry houses, wells and efficient stoves.

Bert Guevara's insight:

If poachers can be transformed into farmers, how about addressing illegal fishermen?


"To shift to an anti-poaching approach that emphasized food security, Lewis sought buy-in from the chiefs who govern in the area. That helped gain the trust of poachers and villagers. Over time, COMACO has grown to involve 100,000 households in the region. Along the way, it has collected almost 80,000 snares and 1,900 guns. A 2013 internal survey of former poachers in 13 chiefdoms found that incomes had improved in all but one. In some places, incomes tripled. COMACO broadens its reach through weekly radio broadcasts that address farming techniques and conservation."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Historic logging ban extended in Indonesia | Environment ("but what about the exemptions?")

Historic logging ban extended in Indonesia | Environment ("but what about the exemptions?") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Indonesian President Joko Widodo has refreshed a two-year moratorium on logging. But some environmental groups say he has ignored demands for more effective protection of the country's forests.

The rule is aimed at protecting the country's virgin forest forests and peatland. But a string of exceptions allow cutting of trees for projects deemed in the national interest. Environmentalists say this can mean everything from oil and gas extraction, to farming in the ostensible interest of food security. And, secondary forests - or areas that have already been logged and then replanted - do not fall under protection.

"More than 70 percent of Indonesia used to be covered by forest," Greenpeace forestry expert Yuyun Indradi told DW. "It's one of our greatest assets, and it is very sad to see deforestation happening at a speed beyond our expectations - and contribute to global [carbon] emissions."

Indradi said that previous to 2011, Indonesia held the word record for the deforestation rate, at 2 million hectares per year. Indonesia still loses an average of around half a million hectares of primary forest each year - mainly to agriculture, according to the World Resources Institute (WRI). Palm oil is the country's biggest agricultural export.

Indonesia's forests are home to endangered species including orangutans, tigers and elephants. According to Greenpeace, the current moratorium leaves 48.5 million hectares of forest at risk.

WRI found that the moratorium was not always upheld, as local officials were often unclear on which areas were protected. The organization has called for Indonesia's rainforests to be given permanent protection, something it says would contribute to the aims of United Nations climate talks in Paris later this year.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Is the Indonesian formula of a logging ban effective in protecting the forests? Or is there a need for improvement?

In the Philippines, how is the "total log ban" doing; and the National Greening Program"?

 

"Indonesian President Joko Widodo has refreshed a two-year moratorium on logging. But some environmental groups say he has ignored demands for more effective protection of the country's forests."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Pagmimina, bawal na sa Davao City | Balita - Tagalog Newspaper Tabloid ("city decides to ban mining")

Pagmimina, bawal na sa Davao City | Balita - Tagalog Newspaper Tabloid ("city decides to ban mining") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
DAVAO CITY – Tuluyan nang isinara ng lokal na pamahalaan ng Davao City ang siyudad sa pagmimina kasunod ng pag-apruba ng Sangguniang Panglungsod, sa regular session nito, sa ikatlo at final reading sa ordinansang nagbabawal sa pagmimina sa lungsod. Maliban sa quarrying ng mga bato at iba pang mineral resources, nakasaad sa ordinansa na hindi na mag-iisyu ang pamahalaang lungsod ng permit sa anumang uri ng pagmimina sa Davao City. Ayon sa Section 5 ng ordinansa, “no approval shall be granted or issued by the city through its Sangguninang Panlalawigan to any person, natural or juridical, to undertake any and all forms of mining operation in any area within the territorial jurisdiction of Davao City, except rocks and mineral substances classified under the quarry resources.” Ang ordinansa ay sinulat ng mga konsehal na sina Leo Avila III at Danilo Dayanghirang. Ang sinumang mapatutunayang lumabag sa nasabing ordinansa ay makukulong ng hindi hihigit sa isang taon at pagmumultahin ng

 

Bert Guevara's insight:

So the City has decided to say NO to mining! This should set the precedent for other LGUs to stop new mining permits from being issued.

 

Ayon sa Section 5 ng ordinansa, “no approval shall be granted or issued by the city through its Sangguninang Panlalawigan to any person, natural or juridical, to undertake any and all forms of mining operation in any area within the territorial jurisdiction of Davao City, except rocks and mineral substances classified under the quarry resources.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

10 Green Technologies That Could Help Revolutionize Our Changing Planet ("are you part of movement?")

10 Green Technologies That Could Help Revolutionize Our Changing Planet ("are you part of movement?") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it

In an era of drought, climate change and food shortages, environmental pioneers have joined forces to help tackle some of the world's most pressing issues through technological advancement.

Here are 10 burgeoning technologies that have the potential to help revolutionize our planet of consumerism. Some are currently in development and others are trying to gain a greater foothold in society, but all are promising solutions to some very real threats the world is facing.

Vertical Farming

Green Burial

Better Lighting

Widespread Composting

Batteries

Renewable Energy At Home

Offshore Wind Power

Reusable Rockets

Drought-Tolerant Crops

(Cheaper) Green Vehicles

 

Bert Guevara's insight:

Check out these green technologies and see if you can support any of these:

Vertical Farming

Green Burial

Better Lighting

Widespread Composting

Batteries

Renewable Energy At Home

Offshore Wind Power

Reusable Rockets

Drought-Tolerant Crops

(Cheaper) Green Vehicles

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Urban farming is booming, but what does it really yield? ("fair chance for smart agriculture?")

Urban farming is booming, but what does it really yield? ("fair chance for smart agriculture?") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
The benefits of city-based agriculture go far beyond nutrition.

That researchers are even bothering to quantify the amount of food produced on tiny city farms — whether community gardens, like those of Camden and Philly, or for-profit operations, like Leadley’s — is testament to the nation’s burgeoning local-foods movement and its data-hungry supporters. Young farmers are, in increasing numbers, planting market gardens in cities, and “local” produce (a term with no formal definition) now fills grocery shelves across the U.S., from Walmart to Whole Foods, and is promoted in more than 150 nations around the world.

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nationsreports that 800 million people worldwide grow vegetables or fruits or raise animals in cities, producing what is widely reported to be an astonishing 15 to 20 percent of the world’s food. In developing nations, city dwellers farm for subsistence, but in the U.S., urban ag is more often driven by capitalism or ideology. The U.S. Department of Agriculture doesn’t track numbers of city farmers, but based on demand for its programs that fund education and infrastructure in support of urban-ag projects, and on surveys of urban ag in select cities, it affirms that business is booming. How far — and in what direction — can this trend go? What portion of a city’s food can local farmers grow, at what price, and who will be privileged to eat it? And can such projects make a meaningful contribution to food security in an increasingly crowded world?

Food that’s grown and consumed in cities has other advantages: During times of abundance, it may cost less than supermarket fare that’s come long distances, and during times of emergency — when transportation and distribution channels break down — it can fill a vegetable void. Following large storms such as Hurricane Sandy and the blizzards of this past winter, says Viraj Puri, cofounder of New York City–based Gotham Greens (which produces more than 300 tons [272 metric tons] of herbs and microgreens per year in two rooftop hydroponic operations and has another farm planned for Chicago), “our produce was the only produce on the shelf at many supermarkets across the city.”

Bert Guevara's insight:

Enough of condos and office buildings. More land and financing should be allotted to "smart" urban agriculture.

If we are losing our farmers in the provinces, then let us train them here within the cities. This is also a job multiplier.

 

"Despite their relatively small size, urban farms grow a surprising amount of food, with yields that often surpass those of their rural cousins. This is possible for a couple reasons. First, city farms don’t experience heavy insect pressure, and they don’t have to deal with hungry deer or groundhogs. Second, city farmers can walk their plots in minutes, rather than hours, addressing problems as they arise and harvesting produce at its peak. They can also plant more densely because they hand cultivate, nourish their soil more frequently and micromanage applications of water and fertilizer."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

U.S. found liable for Hurricane Katrina flooding ("the cyclone triggered a disaster waiting to happen")

U.S. found liable for Hurricane Katrina flooding ("the cyclone triggered a disaster waiting to happen") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
The United States government must pay for some of the damages from Hurricane Katrina flooding caused by failures of the New Orleans flooding protection system.

Judge Susan Braden, of the United States Court of Federal Claims, ruled the Army Corps of Engineers is liable for flooding in the New Orleans area, including the Lower Ninth Ward and St. Bernard Parish, after Hurricane Katrina in August 2005. Braden focused on an Army Corp navigation project known as the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet, or MR-GO, which essentially funneled flood waters into the parish areas. The canal has since been closed.

In her ruling, Braden admonished the Justice Department for pursuing "a litigation strategy of contesting each and every issue—whether evidentiary or substantive."

Braden referred to the 76-mile canal as a "ticking time bomb," adding that it had "substantially expanded and eroded." It was built in the late 1960s, but quickly determined as a danger to the local ecology.

"Certainly by 2004, the Army Corps no longer had any choice but to recognize that a hurricane inevitably would provide the meteorological conditions to trigger the ticking time bomb created by a substantially expanded and eroded MR-GO and the resulting destruction of wetlands that had shielded the St. Bernard Polder for centuries," Braden wrote.

 

Bert Guevara's insight:

After the UK landmark decision involving a clean air mandamus, this is another decision penalizing the government for negligence in maintenance of a canal system.


The United States government must pay for some of the devastating Hurricane Katrina flooding damages in New Orleans caused by a faulty canal system hastily installed decades ago, a federal judge ruled Friday.

"Certainly by 2004, the Army Corps no longer had any choice but to recognize that a hurricane inevitably would provide the meteorological conditions to trigger the ticking time bomb created by a substantially expanded and eroded MR-GO and the resulting destruction of wetlands that had shielded the St. Bernard Polder for centuries," Braden wrote.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

New York state to dim lights to save migrating birds - BBC News ("this may save millions of birds")

New York state to dim lights to save migrating birds - BBC News ("this may save millions of birds") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
State of New York to turn off non-essential lights to try and prevent migratory birds becoming confused and fatally crashing into buildings.

Migrating birds are believed to use stars to navigate but they can be disorientated by electric lights, causing them to crash into buildings.

The phenomenon, known as "fatal light attraction", is estimated to kill up to one billion birds a year in the US.

Millions of birds migrate through New York along the Atlantic Flyway route.

Now those passing over the city by night will stand a better chance of making it further north.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said on Monday that bright outdoor lights will be turned off between 23:00 and dawn during peak migration seasons in spring and autumn.

The state will join several well-known New York landmarks that have already signed up to the National Audubon Society's Lights Out programme, including the Rockefeller Centre, Chrysler Building and Time Warner Centre.

"This is a simple step to help protect these migrating birds that make their home in New York's forests, lakes and rivers," Mr Cuomo said in a statement.

He also announced the new "I Love NY Birding" website, which will provide information on bird watching and how to participate in the Lights Out initiative.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Another lesson in green architecture and engineering -- bird-friendly design and specifications.

 

"Fatal light attraction appears to affect migratory songbirds such as warblers, thrushes and sparrows more than local birds, who learn where they can fly safely.

"Daniel Klem, professor of ornithology and conservation biology at Muhlenberg College who pioneered the study of window strikes, told the BBC last year that the strikes were particularly worrying because the fittest members of the population were just as likely to die in this way as weaker birds."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

These urban farmers want to feed the whole neighborhood -- for free ("abundance breeds generosity")

These urban farmers want to feed the whole neighborhood -- for free ("abundance breeds generosity") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
The Beacon Food Forest plants the heirloom seeds of a real sharing economy.

The Beacon Food Forest is a community gathering space overflowing with yummy, organic perennial plants in Seattle’s Beacon Hill neighborhood, about 2.5 miles south of downtown. At about two acres, it’s already the largest edible garden on public land in the U.S. And it’s a wildly prosperous example of the real sharing economy.

A food forest is pretty much what it sounds like: “A woodland ecosystem that you can eat,” says Glenn Herlihy, one of the BFF’s founders. A food forest mimics how a wild forest works, but swaps in species that are edible or otherwise useful to humans and other animals. Fruit trees and nut trees cast shade (on sunny days) over berry shrubs, herbs, and veggies, while vines climb up trunks and trellises. Underneath, healthy soil teems with tiny life, storing carbon, water, and other nutrients necessary for plant growth. The BFF leans on permaculture farming, which uses ecological design and a bit of good ol’ human labor to create multi-species gardens that bring forth mountains of flavorful, nourishing grub without fossil fuels or other polluting substances.

By contrast, nearly all of the food we eat is grown in monoculture environments, where every plant is eradicated except for one “crop.” That’s true even of most certified organic products. Instead of natural cycles and diverse species supporting each other, you get “dead” soil that needs constant fertilization, watering, and pest control (i.e. spraying poison on food).

 


Bert Guevara's insight:

Looking for an anti-poverty community model? Try this. If an economic system produces prosperity, it should breed generosity - not accumulated profit!


"Community food forestry demonstrates a smarter way to grow food locally — which is important, considering that we’re staring at a future of hungry, hungry humans. The BFF is a lush public garden where all of the produce is up for grabs. Instead of dividing the land into small patches for private planting, like most community gardens, volunteers cultivate the whole food forest together and share, well, the fruits of their labor with anyone and everyone. Urban foragers are welcome to reap what the community sows."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Science-based ecotourism: What the Philippines can learn from Malaysia  ("more income than logging")

Science-based ecotourism: What the Philippines can learn from Malaysia  ("more income than logging") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Here's why the Philippines should follow Malaysia's example, taking advantage of a booming birdwatching industry to boost tourism and environmental awareness. 

Today, the lighthouse's strategic value is to the global race for ecotourism. Forty kilometers southwest of the lighthouse is Pulau Rupat in Sumatra, Indonesia, making this spot the shortest crossing point between Sumatra and Peninsular Malaysia. Since migrating birds of prey generally avoid wide expanses of water, they tend to seek the narrowest crossing points between land masses. This makes Tanjung Tuan an ideal spot to observe raptors and promote ecotourism.

This year, from February 14 to March 29, MNS counted more than 48,000 raptors streaming in from Sumatra into Tanjung Tuan. The five most common migratory raptors observed at Tanjung Tuan are Crested Honey Buzzard, Grey-faced Buzzard (Butastur indicus), Black Baza (Aviceda leuphotes), Chinese Sparrowhawk (Accipiter soloensis) and Japanese Sparrowhawk (Accipiter gularis). Events like RaptorWatch increase awareness about the natural world and help in protecting Malaysia's natural heritage, said Henry Goh, president of MNS at the opening of RaptorWatch 2015. RaptorWatch helping draw attention to the Tanjung Tuan Forest Reserve, which is a sanctuary for many non-avian animals such as squirrels, macaque monkeys, civet cats and dusky leaf monkeys.Compared to Malaysia and other countries in Southeast Asia, raptor migration research in the Philippines is just starting, according to Alex Tiongco of the Raptor Study Group of the Wild Bird Club of the Philippines. However, the knowledge growth has "been phenomenal" in the past few years, stated Tiongco.For instance, thanks to the Raptor Study Group's efforts, we can safely assume that among the most common migratory raptors in the Philippines are Chinese Sparrowhawk (Accipiter soloensis), Grey-faced Buzzard (Butastur indicus), Crested Honey Buzzard, Western Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) and Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus), said Tiongco.  The group has also identified key crossing points for raptors in the country, although more research is needed, he said.
Bert Guevara's insight:

There are several birdwatching eco-tourism sites that can be developed in the Philippines. We can learn from the Malaysian experience.


"In the past three years of serious field research, the group has discovered three major crossing points: Cape San Agustin in Davao Oriental, Barangay Cross in Sarangani and Pagudpud in Ilocos Norte. These areas have the potential to become the Philippines' version of Tanjung Tuan," he said.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

10 things you need to know about sustainable agriculture ("many farmers are giving up; we need new breed")

10 things you need to know about sustainable agriculture ("many farmers are giving up; we need new breed") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Facing climate change and nine billion mouths to feed by 2050, experts shared their thoughts on the future of food security

In a recent live chat, a panel of experts joined readers online to discuss the future of sustainable agriculture in the face of changing weather driven by climate change and increasing competition for food. Here are 10 things we learned:

 

1. We shouldn't just "accept" climate change

2. We don't need to "accept" a world with 9.6 billion people by 2050

3. Switching crops is the future

4. Research breakthroughs need more investment

5. Cultivating trees on farms can boost crop yields

6. Small-scale farmers are vital to domestic food security

7. Urban farms suit tomatoes, not cows

8. Meat is off the menu

9. The definition of a "good" farmer is culturally complex

10. Everyone has a role to play

 

Everyone needs to eat, so be it reducing food loss and waste, eating lower-impact diets or investing in sustainable production - countries, companies, and consumers can make a difference. Surrounded by abundance, the challenge is making consumers care. On this, Liz Bowles, head of farming at the Soil Association, points out that if everyone tried to grow their own vegetables it would bring home just how difficult food production is.

Bert Guevara's insight:

City-dwellers take it for granted that there are enough farmers and enough agriculture to feed all of us. That is no longer the case.

Farmers are quitting; farmlands are drying up; investors are losing; distribution is becoming expensive.

This is part of the green agenda that must be tackled by everyone.

 

"Everyone needs to eat, so be it reducing food loss and waste, eating lower-impact diets or investing in sustainable production - countries, companies, and consumers can make a difference. Surrounded by abundance, the challenge is making consumers care. On this, Liz Bowles, head of farming at the Soil Association, points out that if everyone tried to grow their own vegetables it would bring home just how difficult food production is."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Conservatives Upset At Pope's 'Green Agenda' ("climate issues become part of morality")

Conservatives Upset At Pope's 'Green Agenda' ("climate issues become part of morality") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
NEW YORK (RNS) The Vatican is set to host a major conference on climate change this month that will feature leading researchers on global warming and an opening address by U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

The meeting, which the Vatican detailed...

The Vatican is set to host a major conference on climate change this month that will feature leading researchers on global warming and an opening address by U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

The meeting, which the Vatican detailed on its website late Tuesday (April 14), is another sign of Pope Francis’ “green agenda” and another potential red flag for conservatives who are already alarmed over an expected papal teaching document on the environment that is scheduled for release this summer.

Another goal, says a statement on a Vatican website, is to highlight “the intrinsic connection between respect for the environment and respect for people — especially the poor, the excluded, victims of human trafficking and modern slavery, children, and future generations.”

Others simply believe that Francis — who signaled that environmental protection would be a hallmark of his papacy when he took the name of the unofficial patron saint of ecology, Francis of Assisi — should not be weighing in on issues that touch on technical and scientific matters that some contend are still debatable.

Francis “is an ideologue and a meddlesome egoist,” Maureen Mullarkey wrote in an especially trenchant column at the conservative journal First Things about what she called the pope’s’ “premature, intemperate policy endorsements” on the environment.

Though his two immediate predecessors, Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI and St. John Paul II, also spoke out strongly on the Christian duty to protect the environment, Francis has done so more frequently and forcefully, and at a time when climate change has become a hot-button political issue.


Bert Guevara's insight:

This is another strong push for climate action. The Catholic Church includes climate issues in its moral teachings. The message simply connects love for the environment with love for neighbor and love for God.

My favorite quote is "One cannot say he loves God while destroying His Creation."


"Another goal, says a statement on a Vatican website, is to highlight “the intrinsic connection between respect for the environment and respect for people — especially the poor, the excluded, victims of human trafficking and modern slavery, children, and future generations.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Filipino scientist lauded for disaster research ("a lot of actual data in a vulnerable country")

Filipino scientist lauded for disaster research ("a lot of actual data in a vulnerable country") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Lagmay received the award for his research focusing on volcanic hazards, earthquakes, floods, typhoons, and landslides in the Philippines. 

Alfredo Mahar Lagmay, Executive Director of the Department of Science and Technology’s (DOST) Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards (NOAH) project, has been awarded the 2015 Plinius Medal by the European Geosciences Union (EGU). Lagmay received the award for his research focusing on volcanic hazards, earthquakes, floods, typhoons, and landslides in the Philippines. Lagmay also received the Outstanding Filipino (TOFIL) Award for 2013.

 With more than 12,000 international members, the EGU is a non-profit international union established in 2002 focusing on geosciences and planetary and space sciences. The EGU awards the Plinius Medal to scientists that work on natural hazards research. Project NOAH was launched in 2012 in response to President Benigno Aquino III’s call to implement a responsive disaster prevention and mitigation program. Some of Project NOAH’s component projects include the Hydromet Sensors Development, DREAM-LIDAR 3-D Mapping Project, Flood NET-Flood Management Modeling Project, Hazards Information Media, and Strategic Communication Intervention. A Project NOAH app is also available for Android smartphones. It provides real-time weather information and notifications can be set up for automatic weather alerts during specified intervals. Programs like Project NOAH are especially important in the Philippines, a country that’s consistently been among the most disaster-prone countries in the world for multiple years.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Alfredo Mahar Lagmay, Executive Director of the Department of Science and Technology’s (DOST) Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards (NOAH) project, has been awarded the 2015 Plinius Medal by the European Geosciences Union (EGU). Lagmay received the award for his research focusing on volcanic hazards, earthquakes, floods, typhoons, and landslides in the Philippines. Lagmay also received the Outstanding Filipino (TOFIL) Award for 2013.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

The Future of Farms ("driven by necessity, farming has to invade the city to sustain its population")

The Future of Farms ("driven by necessity, farming has to invade the city to sustain its population") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Why agriculture may someday take place in towers, not fields

The future of farming is looking up—literally, and in more ways than one: There are grow towers, rooftops, and industry talk of Waterworld-style “plant factories” in futuristic floating cities. And this vertical movement is happening for a variety of reasons. For one, by prioritizing localized operations, it offers a remedy to the mounting economic difficulties that independent farmers face when otherwise so easily underpriced by Big Ag. But more importantly, it’s rising out of environmental concerns—space, soil health, climate change, vital ecosystems decimated by monoculture. According to the professor of environmental health sciences Dickson Despommier in his article “The Vertical Farm: Reducing the Impact of Agriculture on Ecosystem Function and Services,” we should expect over the next 50 years for the human population to reach 8.6 billion, requiring an additional growing area “roughly the size of Brazil.”

In effect, the crops grow upward, maximizing the limited space within the climate-controlled walls of the greenhouse. The crops are fertilized and irrigated by deep-blue tanks of living tilapia, swimming around just out of sight. The fish tanks are rigged into part of a system that uses principles of hydroponics and aquaculture: one, the practice of using mineral-nutrient solutions in water for soil-less growing, and the other, the practice of using aquatic-life byproduct to fertilize. The waste of the tilapia is broken down, absorbed by the plants for food, and then the water is recirculated through the crops. The result? Bright Agrotech uses only 60 gallons of water a day, or about 22,000 a year (which, if you compare to water use in the average American household—400 gallons a day for a family of four—isn’t bad.) Plus a conventionally grown plot of that size would require 20 times that amount annually, according to Storey, and traditional commercial ag loses half of its water to evaporation, run-off, and flood irrigation.

Bert Guevara's insight:

There is a new development in urban agriculture which goes beyond being green. New economic realities make it sustainable.


"Storey says that while vertical aquaponics and hydroponics is no doubt a response to environmental concerns, the approach is also business-driven. “Energy is expensive, so reducing reliance on traditional energy sources is not just more environmentally sound but also economically sound,” he says. “Part of reducing energy inputs is tripling our production per square foot. It means that we can reduce our energy consumption per unit of output by 66 percent.” In other words, the small farmer has fewer overhead costs."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

More CO2 = More Pollen | Climate Central ("bad news for allergy sensitive people")

More CO2 = More Pollen | Climate Central ("bad news for allergy sensitive people") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Climate change has increased pollen counts and the length of the pollen season, trends that are expected to continue through mid-century.

The arrival of spring is kind of a good news/bad news story. The good news is that spring brings warmer weather and blossoms everywhere, as trees and flowers wake up from hibernation. But that’s also the bad news, at least for anyone who suffers from spring allergies. All of that flowering and leaf-opening means pollen will be filling the air and creating a yellow haze on cars — followed by sneezing, dripping, sinus-clogging misery for millions of Americans. Now here’s the worse news: rising carbon dioxide levels, mainly due to human-induced emissions, are increasing pollen production.

When scientists put plants in a growing chamber to test varying levels of CO2 on pollen production, the changes were significant — as the graphic above shows. Pollen production was more than twice as great when the chamber was set to 1999 CO2 levels (around 370 parts per million, or ppm) as it was when it was set to pre-industrial levels (about 280 ppm). And when the scientists cranked it up to 600 ppm, where things could be heading by the year 2060 (assuming we don’t curb CO2 emissions, that is), pollen production nearly doubled again.

Climate change is adding to the allergy season in another way, too. Generally higher temperatures over the past few decades, mainly due to rising levels of heat-trapping carbon dioxide, have extended the frost-free season and madespring come earlier on average (although not this year in the East) — lengthening the pollen season. One study shows how the pollen season has been extended by as much as 10-21 days from 1995-2013 across northern Arkansas up into the Great Lakes. In fact, that study suggests higher latitude locations have extended their pollen season more than lower latitudes, where central Texas recorded a 1-day decrease in pollen season.

Bert Guevara's insight:

I have recurring allergic rhinitis, which I noticed to be occurring more often as years go by. This explanation of carbon-induced pollination is bad news for me. Can I just sue major carbon-emitters for all the trouble?

 

"... Now here’s the worse news: rising carbon dioxide levels, mainly due to human-induced emissions, are increasing pollen production.

"When scientists put plants in a growing chamber to test varying levels of CO2 on pollen production, the changes were significant — as the graphic above shows. Pollen production was more than twice as great when the chamber was set to 1999 CO2 levels (around 370 parts per million, or ppm) as it was when it was set to pre-industrial levels (about 280 ppm). And when the scientists cranked it up to 600 ppm, where things could be heading by the year 2060 (assuming we don’t curb CO2 emissions, that is), pollen production nearly doubled again."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Weapons trafficking experts target criminal wildlife trade networks ("anti-poaching goes hi-tech")

Weapons trafficking experts target criminal wildlife trade networks ("anti-poaching goes hi-tech") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
An outfit usually associated with investigating arms dealers and weapons traffickers is applying its advanced network mapping capabilities to go after wildlife trafficking syndicates. This week Washington D.C.-based C4ADS unveiled the Environmental Crimes Fusion Cell, a unit which consists of a team of analysts, network mapping technology provided by software company Palantir, and a network of NGOs and enforcement agencies. The unit analyses wildlife trade data to provide actionable intelligence to pursue and apprehend traffickers.

"We adapt methodologies developed for the security community and combine them with cutting-edge Palantir technology and innovative sources of public and commercial data, to map and expose wildlife criminal networks," C4ADS's Jackson Miller told Mongabay. "We have a dedicated team of analysts who work across multiple languages, and have a network of over 50 organizations and individuals around the world who feed us raw data and insights from the field that we can analyze and structure in a way that can lead to actionable, real-world results." 
The initiative includes a web platform that provides current and historic data on large-scale ivory seizures as well as a tracking portal for ammunition typically used for poaching and background information on illicit ivory, rhino horn, and timber supply chains. C4ADS also published a report detailing how trafficking networks often finance their operations and smuggle contraband. It highlights risks and potential exposure for shipping companies and banks. 

"Central to the 'fusion cell' concept is the concept of collaboration," Jackson told Mongabay. "This cell is designed to be supportive of others' efforts in the field, a resource both conservationists and officials can lean on for objective data and analysis. We hope to become a bridge between the many different stakeholders who must all come together to help solve this very complex issue." 

Bert Guevara's insight:

We hope that this hi-tech collaboration yields immediate results before the elephant population goes extinct.


"We adapt methodologies developed for the security community and combine them with cutting-edge Palantir technology and innovative sources of public and commercial data, to map and expose wildlife criminal networks," C4ADS's Jackson Miller told Mongabay. "We have a dedicated team of analysts who work across multiple languages, and have a network of over 50 organizations and individuals around the world who feed us raw data and insights from the field that we can analyze and structure in a way that can lead to actionable, real-world results." 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Disaster Recovery and Renewables Deployment in Nepal | The Energy Collective ("solar tech very useful")

Disaster Recovery and Renewables Deployment in Nepal | The Energy Collective ("solar tech very useful") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Avishek Malla is no stranger to bringing solar-powered light to communities in need. As the director of engineering for SunFarmer, a nonprofit that provides solar power and batteries to remote hospitals and schools in developing countries, illuminating spaces to meet basic human needs is in his job description.

Many of the challenges that SunFarmer faces are not unique to Nepal or the current crisis. Clean energy technologies, especially solar-powered generators, seem like a logical choice during disaster relief efforts, as they do not require fuel supplies to be shipped in. Unlike more traditional technologies such as diesel generators, however, they are often not considered by NGOs during the planning process and are not warehoused and ready to go when emergencies happen.

The cleantech sector needs to work more cohesively with large NGOs and local stakeholders before disasters happen, say professionals in the field. In some cases, that would involve rethinking how the organizations use power during a crisis, what standard equipment and interconnections look like, and how clean energy could scale in a disaster.

“This is a big ask of the NGOs, even in non-crisis situations,” said Zach Lyman of Reluminati, a cleantech consulting firm.

For starters, off-grid solar systems or microgrids that are used in "blue-sky" conditions are not even close to what is needed right after a disaster. SunFarmer, supported in part by SunEdison, usually deploys 2-kilowatt systems with battery backups to remote hospitals.

SunFarmer was well positioned to try to coordinate solar assets for the relief effort because it already had staff on the ground that understood local supply chains and stakeholders. “We want to be mindful of not spending money on anything but what’s needed,” Eller said of SunFarmer’s response efforts, even if that was diesel generators. “We’re not above that,” she said of supporting diesel backup, “but that just wasn’t the right technology.”

Bert Guevara's insight:

It is in disaster situations that green technologies can be put to the test. In Nepal, solar technology is proving its worth.

 

“What assets can you put in place that provide economically viable power every day to the community, but are part of resilient microgrid architectures when the earthquake hits?” asked Reluminati's Lyman. “This is the future of cleantech in disasters, and it will be huge -- both internationally and domestically.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Biophilia and Design and Architecture | Sustainable Cities Collective ("aim is to link man to nature")

Biophilia and Design and Architecture | Sustainable Cities Collective ("aim is to link man to nature") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Poorly conceived design visibly divided us in urban areas from our wilds and contributed to our recent ability to see nature as something isolated from us. Yet reinvigorating our bond with nature is a challenge architecture and urban design are well placed to address.

The separation that we have crafted over the centuries through our isolating designs hasn’t come without costs.

Obesity, ADHD, autism, a decline in creativity—these are all connected to a lack of environmental connection.

Unfortunately, this estrangement from nature has not only directly impacted our health, it has impacted our ability to respond to crucial modern challenges, such as climate change, because these dire environmental topics feel removed from us.

The environment appears distant because we designed it as such. Sim Van der Ryn and Stuart Cowan describe this impact in their seminal book, Ecological Design:

“What do we learn from this kind of ‘nowhere’ environment? When living and working in nowhere places becomes normal, it is no wonder that we literally lose some of our sensitivity toward nature.

Through the daily experience of the designed environment, we learn detachment… As nature has receded from our daily lives, it has receded from our ethics.”

Yet despite putting up physical barriers between nature and us, we still cannot shake our deep tie to and need for other species.

Humans have an ingrained desire to connect. E.O. Wilson describes this impulse in his ‘Biophilia Hypothesis’ in which he explains,

“…When human beings remove themselves from the natural environment, the biophilic learning rules are not replaced by modern versions equally well adapted to artifacts. Instead, they persist from generation to generation. For the indefinite future… urban dwellers will go on dreaming of snakes for reasons they cannot explain.”

We crave connection to the natural world, even if we, individually, have always been seemingly divided from it.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Reconnecting man to nature in an urban environment.

 

"Poorly conceived design divides us in urban areas from our wilds and has contributed to seeing nature as something isolated from us. Yet reinvigorating our bond with nature is a challenge architecture and urban design are well placed to address. 

"Architects and designers have control over our built environment; by changing the way we design cities and buildings to connect to rather than disconnect from nature, we can change our proximity to nature and shift our physical relationship to the environment."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Herbicides kill monarch food, while insecticides kill the monarchs themselves, says USDA study

Herbicides kill monarch food, while insecticides kill the monarchs themselves, says USDA study | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Common insecticides are killing monarch butterfly larvae, says a USDA study.

Monophagy—relying entirely on a single food source—is a risky survival strategy for a species. Some make it work, like the plentiful snail kite, a hawk that subsists on freshwater snails. But other monophagous species find themselves in trouble when humans interfere with their sole form of sustenance. Just ask a giant panda—if you can find one—about the declining stock of bamboo.

Monarch butterflies have also gambled on monophagy. They lay their eggs on milkweed, a wide-ranging perennial, and after hatching, monarch caterpillars feed exclusively on the plant. A few decades ago, milkweed blanketed much of the American landscape, so putting all your evolutionary eggs in the milkweed basket wasn’t such a terrible idea. The advent of crops genetically modified to tolerate weed-killing herbicides, however, has enabled farmers to spray huge amounts of herbicide on their fields. Milkweed has suffered greatly. A widely cited 2012 study found that 58 percent of Midwestern milkweed disappeared between 1999 and 2010, leading to an 81 percent decline in monarch reproduction.

A recent study, however, suggests that herbicides are just the jab in a one-two punch that American farmers are delivering to monarch butterflies. In addition to herbicides, farmers spray large amounts of a family of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, named for their chemical similarity to nicotine. Neonics are effective because, after the chemical is taken up by a crop, it becomes part of its pollen, nectar, and leaves. The insecticide effectively makes the plant itself toxic to pests.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Imagine a world without butterflies ... that is where we are headed unless we change our deadly agricultural pest and weed management.


“We need to find alternative solutions to manage agriculture,” says Sylvia Fallon, director of NRDC’s Wildlife Conservation Project (disclosure). “We’re spraying herbicides and insecticides everywhere. It’s no wonder we’re seeing declines in all kinds of beneficial insects and pollinators that weren’t the intended target.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

150,000 Stand With Peruvian Woman in Fight Against World's Largest Gold Mine » EcoWatch ("tough match")

150,000 Stand With Peruvian Woman in Fight Against World's Largest Gold Mine » EcoWatch ("tough match") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Máxima Acuña de Chaupe and other activists from Cajamarca, Peru appeared at the meeting of Newmont Mining Corporation to protest the company’s practices in the

Newmont is majority owner of the massive Peruvian gold mine Yanacocha, the second largest gold mine in the world, and its planned Conga gold and copper mine nearby would be even larger, requiring a farming community to move and the four lakes they rely on for irrigation to be drained.

But the community has so far refused to relinquish its treasured land and lakes, and in response activists say the company has reacted with intimidation and harassment.

Despite this legal victory, activists say that intimidation and threats against Acuña de Chaupe have continued, reporting that the family’s home was demolished again in February 2015, this time by a group of 200 armed men.

For its part, Newmont maintains that it and Yanacocha always strive to be respectful of neighboring communities, and that they will not proceed without clear social acceptance. But in the case of Acuña de Chaupe, spokesman Omar Jabara continued to maintain that the family is illegally squatting on the company’s land. “On many occasions, the company has tried to resolve the dispute through direct dialogue, and remains open and willing to doing so. In the meantime,” he said by email, “Yanacocha is obliged to continue pursuing judicial avenues to re-establish its legal right to the property, while making every effort to reduce tensions and minimize conflict.”

However, Earthworks International Program Director Payal Sampat maintains that it’s too late to build bridges or reduce tensions. “The community of Cajamarca has said loud and clear—and repeatedly—that they reject the Conga mine. Instead of listening to the community and respecting their wishes, Newmont has employed security forces to intimidate and harass those who oppose them. This ‘scorched earth’ approach is hurting not only the people of Cajamarca, but Newmont’s reputation and business as well.”

Bert Guevara's insight:

This story is repeated in many mining sites in the Philippines. When big mining companies use intimidation and legal bullying, the community has to stand up for its rights. But battling a mining giant is not a simple fight. Lives are put on the line.

It is sad that in many communities, the local leaders are willing to turn a blind eye for a small piece of fortune.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Ten Strategies for Transforming Cities & Public Spaces thru Placemaking | Project for Public Spaces

Ten Strategies for Transforming Cities & Public Spaces thru Placemaking | Project for Public Spaces | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it

Building inclusive, healthy, functional, and productive cities is perhaps the greatest challenge facing humanity today, and there are no easy solutions. A key part of the puzzle, though, lies right at the heart of the world’s urban areas: its public spaces. Here are ten ways you can help strengthen the social fabric of your community and jump-start economic development by creating and sustaining healthy public spaces.

1. IMPROVE STREETS AS PLACES

 

2. CREATE SQUARES AND PARKS AS MULTI-USE DESTINATIONS

 

3. BUILD LOCAL ECONOMIES THROUGH MARKETS

 

4. DESIGN BUILDINGS TO SUPPORT PLACES

 

5. LINK A PUBLIC HEALTH AGENDA TO A PUBLIC SPACE AGENDA

 

6. REINVENT COMMUNITY PLANNING

 

7. UTILIZE THE POWER OF 10+

 

8. CREATE A COMPREHENSIVE PUBLIC SPACE AGENDA

 

9. START SMALL AND EXPERIMENT, USING A “LIGHTER, QUICKER, CHEAPER” APPROACH

 

10. RESTRUCTURE GOVERNMENT TO SUPPORT PUBLIC SPACES

 

 

 

Bert Guevara's insight:

The trend of populations moving towards cities highlights the need to create places for people. Here are some ideas of how to create public places by Placemaking.


"Mexico provides a positive example of how that can occur. Since 2007, SEDESOL, the Mexican Ministry of Social Development, has “rescued” 42,000 public spaces across the country by promoting the realization of social actions and the execu­tion of physical works to restore community meeting places, social interaction, and everyday recreation in insecure and marginalized urban areas. The goals of the Rescue of Public Spaces program are to help improve the quality of life and safety through the revitalization of public spaces in cities and metropolitan areas across Mexico, thereby promoting healthy living."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Why Filipinos should consider becoming farmers ("smart agri needs smart farmers; incentives lacking")

Why Filipinos should consider becoming farmers ("smart agri needs smart farmers; incentives lacking") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
MANILA -- Despite being an agricultural country, the number of people entering the industry in the Philippines is decreasing, mainly due to various stereotypes about farming.

"Ang gobyerno, nagtatalaga ng wage policies. Kapag ikaw ay nasa agricultural sector, ang sweldo mo, ganito lamang. Kapag ikaw ay nasa industry, ang sweldo mo, ganito. So kung ikaw eh isang kabataan, saan ka pupunta? Siyempre doon sa trabaho na mataas ang sweldo. Hindi pa nadudumihan ang kamay, hindi ka pa nakabilad sa araw," he added.

This shows the government is not keen on giving incentives for farmers, unlike in other countries.

"Sa ibang bansa, meron silang tinatawag na, tulad sa Japan, income parity policy. Ang gobyerno, ina-assure, na kung ikaw ay mananatili sa farm mo, at magtatrabaho sa farm, the government assures you of an income that is at par, if not better, than what you will earn kapag ikaw ay magtatrabaho sa factory," Domingo said.

For Domingo and Serrano, understanding that agriculture industry is more than just farming can help people give more importance to this profession.

This can be done by re-orienting the educational system and including agriculture in lessons in elementary and high school.

Bert Guevara's insight:

The Phil may end up importing most of its food at the rate we are losing our farmers. Aside from poor infrastructure support, aggravated by climate change; our policies on land reform and import violations have made agriculture unattractive to the youth. They would rather go abroad. Old farmers are dying out and selling their farmland for conversion.


"Bakit wala nang magsasaka? Kasi hindi ino-honor ang farmers. Hindi [sila] binibigyan ng halaga...there's something wrong in our society. We do not honor hardwork. We do not honor labor...parang palagi na lang sila ang na-aabuso, 'ika nga," Velasco added.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Sustainable Construction Technologies to Save the Earth ("it is no longer an option to go green")

Sustainable Construction Technologies to Save the Earth ("it is no longer an option to go green") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
With green building becoming a critical part of today’s world, more and more new construction technologies are being developed to keep up with demand.

Without a doubt, green building is on the rise as global trends attest. According to the World Green Building Trends survey, 51 percent of respondent firms committed to incorporating sustainability into more than 60 percent of their work by 2015. The same report also identified the benefits of green building that draw these businesses into sustainable construction: Greater health and productivity topped the list of social reasons for companies going green in their construction. On the other hand, energy saving led in the environmental reasons, with water use reduction, lower greenhouse gas emissions and natural resource conservation placing second in different regions.

With green building becoming a critical part of today’s world, more and more new construction technologies are being developed to keep up with this escalating shift to sustainability. From maximizing the use of renewable resources to minimizing carbon footprint, whether in constructing a new sustainable building or greening existing infrastructure, these seven construction technologies aim to save the planet.

Going green brings in a host of advantages that businesses simply cannot ignore. While some green construction technologies cost more upfront, companies reap benefits in the long run. What’s more, sustainable construction technologies are constantly being developed for wide-scale and more affordable distribution, what with the increasing demand for green buildings that underpin the optimistic outlook for the future of green building.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Lower costs in the beginning may cost more to the building user in the long run. The "green" design criteria becomes critical in this time of global warming.


"Going green brings in a host of advantages that businesses simply cannot ignore. While some green construction technologies cost more upfront, companies reap benefits in the long run. What’s more, sustainable construction technologies are constantly being developed for wide-scale and more affordable distribution, what with the increasing demand for green buildings that underpin the optimistic outlook for the future of green building."

more...
Jan Lagast's curator insight, April 26, 11:30 AM

The seven trends are:

1. Using sustainable construction materials

2. Architectural design for better use of natural light and airflow

3. Zero-energy buildings

4. Water reuse and supply technologies

5. Storm-water management

6. Low-emittance windows and smart glass

7. Cool roofs 

IExplain.in's curator insight, May 17, 9:51 AM

Reduced burden on carbon based fuels is a must for smart cities. Measures should be taken for exploiting either usage or conservation of the natural energy sources.

Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

30 great ways to celebrate Earth Day every day ("a billion small acts of green can make a big diff")

30 great ways to celebrate Earth Day every day ("a billion small acts of green can make a big diff") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
Don't wait for April 22! Here is a month-long list of eco-awesome activities you can do to celebrate the planet every day.

 

1. Plant a tree.

2. Plant a garden.

3. Pick up litter in your favorite local park.

4. Go for a hike.

5. Go for a picnic.

6. Reduce. Give the Earth and your wallet a break this month and pass on that new shirt or DVD.

7. Reuse. 

8. Recycle. If it's not already a habit, make it one this month. 

9. Go ahead.  Hug a tree.

10. Go meat-free. (Find great recipes to get you started here.)

11. Volunteer with your local environmental club or at a nearby state park.

12. Run or walk a 5K. 

13. Go for a hike.

14. Make eco-art.

15. Turn out the lights.

16. Step away from the car and walk or ride your bike instead.

17. Host an eco-swap.  Get together with friends and neighbors to swap your gently used spring cleaning discards.  

18. Take shorter showers.

19. Hit your local Green Festival to learn more about eco-happenings in your area.

20. Read an eco-book to your kids.

21. Read an eco-book to yourself.

22. Go for a bike ride.

23. Break the plastic water bottle habit.  

24. Break the plastic bag habit.

25. Donate to a worthy eco-cause.  

26. Support your local wildlife.

27. Build a birdhouse.

28. Build a rain barrel.

29. Buy local.

30. Get outside.

Bert Guevara's insight:

"Earth Day Everyday, Everywhere, for Everyone" 

A billion (small) acts of green can make a big difference if done every day, all over the world.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bert Guevara
Scoop.it!

Environmental Activists Killed in Record Numbers in 2014 ("Phl gov't forest guards not yet counted")

Environmental Activists Killed in Record Numbers in 2014 ("Phl gov't forest guards not yet counted") | Earth Citizens Perspective | Scoop.it
At least 116 deaths globally were tied to disputes involving natural resources.

A majority of deaths were tied to disputes over hydropower, mining and agri-business

The killing of environmental activists jumped by 20% in 2014, with at least 116 deaths around the world tied to disputes involving land and natural resources, the London-based advocacy organization Global Witness claimed this week.

“[That’s] almost double the number of journalists killed in the same period,” its report said. “Disputes over the ownership, control and use of land was an underlying factor in killings of environmental and land defenders in nearly all documented cases.”

According to How Many More?, the majority of deaths took place in Central and South America; Brazil topped the list with 29 cases followed by Colombia with 25.

Global Witness dubbed Honduras as “the most dangerous country per capita to be an environmental activist,” where during the past five years 101 individuals have been killed in relation to their advocacy work.

The organization urged governments across the globe to take bolder measures to tackle the issue ahead of the U.N. Climate Change Conference that will be held in Paris later this year.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Earth Day message: protect the nature defenders. In the Philippines, DENR forest guards are being killed by illegal loggers.


“Environmental and land defenders are often on the frontlines of efforts to address the climate crisis and are critical to success,” said the report. “Unless governments do more to protect these activists, any words agreed in Paris will ultimately ring hollow.”

more...
No comment yet.