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How is Nature doing?

How is Nature doing? | Earth Rangers' Science Content | Scoop.it
A more serious and recurrent answer was 'biodiversity' and there is no doubt that that diversity has been rapidly reducing the last few centuries. Some openly said biodiversity should be the definition and it was also implicitly ...
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Why Do We Need Genebanks: The World's International Genebank Managers Tell Us

The importance of safeguarding biodiversity is a key element of future food security worldwide. Collaboration between the Crop Trust and international ...

Via Luigi Guarino
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Cancer On The Rise Globally: 15 Million Cancer Cases Diagnosed in 2013

Cancer On The Rise Globally: 15 Million Cancer Cases Diagnosed in 2013 | Earth Rangers' Science Content | Scoop.it

The number of new cases of cancer in the world is rising, according to a new report that looked at cancer in 118 countries. Globally, the number of new cancer cases increased from 8.5 million in 1990 to 14.9 million in 2013, the study found. The world population rose from 5.3 billion to 7.1 billion during that time. In addition, cancer is accounting for an increasingly greater proportion of deaths: In 1990, 12 percent of all deaths in the countries studied were due to cancer, but in 2013, it was 15 percent.


The researchers specifically looked at 28 different types of cancer, and found that cases from nearly all of these types of cancer have increased in the last two decades — ranging from a 9 percent increase in cervical cancer cases to a 217 percent increase in prostate cancer cases. The only cancer that decreased during the study period was Hodgkin's lymphoma, which saw a 10 percent decrease in the number of new cases between 1990 and 2013.


The overall rise in cancer cases is partly due to longer life spans, since the risk of cancer increases with age. "With life expectancy increasing globally, the future burden of cancer will likely increase," the researchers said. The growing global population, increases in obesity and poor dietary habits also have contributed to the rise, they said.


Cancer is more common in men than in women, with 1 in 3 men worldwide developing cancer before age 79, compared with 1 in 5 women. The most common cancer overall was cancer of the lungs, trachea or bronchus, with 1.8 million new cases and 1.6 million deaths in 2013, followed by breast cancer and colon cancer. The most common cancer in men was prostate cancer, and the most common cancer in women was breast cancer.


A particularly concerning trend is an increase in cancer cases in developing countries, the researchers said. In 2013, the rates of new cancer cases were higher in developing countries than in developed countries for stomach cancer, liver cancer, esophageal cancer, cervical cancer, mouth cancer, and nose and throat cancer.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Climate Model Suggests 99% of Everest Glaciers Could Disappear By End of Century

Climate Model Suggests 99% of Everest Glaciers Could Disappear By End of Century | Earth Rangers' Science Content | Scoop.it

By the end of this century, the landscape around Mount Everest may drastically change. As the planet continues to warm, the Everest region of Nepal could lose most of its glaciers, according to a study published in the journal The Cryosphere.


“We did not expect to see glaciers reduced at such a large scale,” said Joseph Shea, a glacier hydrologist at the International Center for Integrated Mountain Development in Nepal and lead author of the new report. “The numbers are quite frightening.”


Dr. Shea and his colleagues found that moderate reductions in greenhouse gas emissions could result in a 70 percent loss of glaciers around Mount Everest, while a business-as-usual scenario in which emissions remain at the same levels could result in a 99 percent loss.


To arrive at these findings, Dr. Shea and his colleagues used a computer model for glacier melt, accumulation and redistribution. They customized the model with data on temperature and precipitation, measurements from the field and remote-sensing observations collected over 50 years from the Dudh Koshi basin, which includes Mount Everest and several of the world’s other highest peaks.


The model took into account how much mass glaciers gain from snowfall, as well as the way that mass is redistributed by continual downward movement. The researchers applied the model to eight future climate scenarios, from moderate emissions reductions to none at all.


The results do not bode well for the glaciers around Everest. Even if emissions are reduced by midcentury and rain in the region increases, the model predicts that the majority of the glaciers will probably disappear by 2100.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Endangered Species Day: celebrating the planet's most important creatures - The Guardian

Endangered Species Day: celebrating the planet's most important creatures - The Guardian | Earth Rangers' Science Content | Scoop.it
To honor Endangered Species Day and the International Day of Families, we’ve put together a photographic celebration of endangered species together with their nearest and dearest
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Silent Invaders Sea Lamprey 2013

Real Vampires in Nature. The Sea Lamprey is one of several vampiric creatures that feed on the blood of other animals. This vampire animal attaches itself to .
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Prescribed burn at Maas Family Nature Preserve

The Land Conservancy of West Michigan conducted a prescribed burn at Maas Family Nature Preserve. This is a restoration technique used to reduce invasive ...
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Climate change will endanger caribou habitat, study finds - Science Recorder

Climate change will endanger caribou habitat, study finds - Science Recorder | Earth Rangers' Science Content | Scoop.it
The findings suggest that there are a higher number of shared traits between caribou and reindeer than previously thought, and that climate change played a role in the animals’ respective evolution.
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Endangered sei whales found beached on Chilean coast - CBC.ca

Endangered sei whales found beached on Chilean coast - CBC.ca | Earth Rangers' Science Content | Scoop.it
Chilean officials said Friday that about two dozen endangered sei whales have been found beached along the South American country's southern coast.
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Leopard Kill Crocodile incredible video 2015

alligator alligators snake snakes crocodile crocodiles python snakes snake vs alligator vs burmese pythons invasive species dangerous aggressive deadly .
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New Rules to Help Slow the Spread of Aquatic Invasive Species - KELO AM-FM

New Rules to Help Slow the Spread of Aquatic Invasive Species - KELO AM-FM | Earth Rangers' Science Content | Scoop.it
PIERRE, SD (KELO AM) – As of May 11, 2015, boaters and anglers, residents and nonresidents, are required to comply with new rules to help slow the spread of aquatic invasive ...
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Michael the white lion now calls Tiger World home - Salisbury Post

Michael the white lion now calls Tiger World home - Salisbury Post | Earth Rangers' Science Content | Scoop.it
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LIFE AT BOOMER LAKE: Birds of a feather really do flock together - Stillwater News Press

LIFE AT BOOMER LAKE: Birds of a feather really do flock together - Stillwater News Press | Earth Rangers' Science Content | Scoop.it
Many things have merit during spring, and a couple of the notables are roosting areas. Famous for these are the Turkey Vulture and the Double-crested Cormorants.
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Ecopharmacognosy and the responsibilities of natural product research to sustainability

Ecopharmacognosy and the responsibilities of natural product research to sustainability | Earth Rangers' Science Content | Scoop.it

 

« The recently developed term “ecopharmacognosy” is defined as the study of sustainable, biologically active, natural resources. As a philosophical approach, it provides a conceptual framework for developing new strategies and new scientific perspectives which may improve future global food and health care product accessibility and assure beneficial outcomes. In this brief article some facets of how the precepts of ecopharmacognosy may apply in developing new medicinal products may be developed, based on sustainability and the use of integrated technologies.

Although from a medicinal agent perspective, plants remain a primary source of global health care, these resources are not being pursued by major pharmaceutical companies as sources of new agents, and essentially all tropical diseases, as well as most microbially based diseases, remain outside the scope of their drug discovery programs. Countries and regions therefore must address their own drug discovery needs for “local” and some global diseases. In addition, the cost of drug importation is so high that development of local resources, i.e. traditional medicines, may be the only rational alternative approach. At the same time, network pharmacology is exploring the many diverse effects of both individual and complex natural products at the gene level, and this is offering new opportunities to rethink and restructure the core, long-standing, Western, magic bullet philosophy to drug discovery. Other ecopharmacognosy changes underway include the computer-aided design of natural product derivatives, based on molecular docking, which is providing targetable enzyme substrates, and remote sensing technologies which can assess natural materials non-invasively for critical constituents as a part of rethinking quality control strategies in the field. Furthermore, there are the hyphenated chromatographic and spectroscopic procedures to quantitatively analyze single and multicomponent plant mixtures for bioactive markers to enhance quality control and, thereby, patient care. The relationship of these evolving approaches will serve as practical examples to the philosophies of ecopharmacognosy. In summary, with respect to health care, ecopharmacognosy poses the long-term practical question for drugs, “How Green is Your Medicine?” »

 

Geoffrey A. Cordell,

 

Phytocĥemistry letters

doi:10.1016/j.phytol.2014.09.003


Via NatProdChem
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NatProdChem's curator insight, June 1, 2015 12:52 PM

« A paper I missed during my bibliography watch, some really good references and ideas linking. You can probably pick one of the ideas developed there and spend the next 30 years on it. Definitively one of the papers of the year in the "philosophy of phytochemistry" category.» J.


So ... when do we open The Philophytochemistry Journal ?? P.M.

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Death on the Steppes: Mystery Disease Killed 100,000 Saigas in Recent Weeks

Death on the Steppes: Mystery Disease Killed 100,000 Saigas in Recent Weeks | Earth Rangers' Science Content | Scoop.it
More than 100,000 saigas in Central Asia have died in recent weeks of an unknown disease.

 

Before the end of the last Ice Age, saigas roamed by the millions in a range stretching from England to Siberia, even into Alaska. Eventually they moved to the steppes of Central Asia, where they continued to thrive — until the 20th century, when these strange-looking antelopes began flirting with extinction.


Hunted for its horns, 95 percent of the population disappeared, and the saiga was declared critically endangered. After the implementation of strict antipoaching measures, the population recovered, from a low of 50,000 to about 250,000 last year. “It was a big success story,” said Eleanor J. Milner-Gulland, the chairwoman of the Saiga Conservation Alliance.


Now that success is in jeopardy. Last month, a mysterious disease swept through the remaining saiga herds, littering the steppes with carcasses. The so-called die-off claimed more than a third of the world’s population in just weeks.


An international team of wildlife biologists is now examining tissues taken from dead saigas, hoping to figure out what killed them. Whatever it is, it has the potential to undo years of conservation efforts, further endangering the species.


“Once we know what’s causing it, then we need to think very hard about how to avoid it in the future,” said Aline Kuehl-Stenzel, the terrestrial species coordinator of the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals.


From time to time, saigas have faced widespread die-offs. The last major one occurred in 2010, when 12,000 animals died. The causes are still uncertain, because biologists did not reach the animals until long after they expired.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Drilling continues on critical Alberta caribou habitat despite recovery deadline - Globalnews.ca

Drilling continues on critical Alberta caribou habitat despite recovery deadline - Globalnews.ca | Earth Rangers' Science Content | Scoop.it
Thousands of oil and gas wells continue to be drilled on critical caribou habitat despite an approaching deadline for Alberta to come up with a plan to restore those ranges.
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Healthy Habits for Healthy Habitats: Natural Shorelines

The Central Algoma Freshwater Coalition presents our educational video series: Healthy Habits for Healthy Habitats with funding provided by Mountain ...
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'Habitat-enhanced' vineyards are good for butterflies - UPI.com

'Habitat-enhanced' vineyards are good for butterflies - UPI.com | Earth Rangers' Science Content | Scoop.it
Researchers recently found that there were quadruple the number of butterflies and triple the number butterfly species in habitat-enhanced vineyards.
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Prescribed burn at Brower Lake Nature Preserve

The Land Conservancy of West Michigan conducted a prescribed burn at Brower Lake Nature Preserve. This is a restoration technique used to reduce invasive ...
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American badger

The American badger (Taxidea taxus) is a North American badger, somewhat similar in appearance to the European badger. It is found in the western and ...
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Good Migrations: Sparrows have drab colors but pretty songs - Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Good Migrations: Sparrows have drab colors but pretty songs - Fairbanks Daily News-Miner | Earth Rangers' Science Content | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS — While it’s easy to admire the vivid yellow of a Wilson’s warbler, it takes more effort to appreciate sparrows. Feathered in palettes of mostly browns and grays, this group of songbirds spreads across a wide variety of habitats.
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Endangered Whales Being Struck By Boats Off Cape Cod - CBS Local

Endangered Whales Being Struck By Boats Off Cape Cod - CBS Local | Earth Rangers' Science Content | Scoop.it
Environmental Police are telling boaters to be careful and stay clear of any whales.
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Endangered right whale struck, injured by boat this week - Cape Cod Today

Endangered right whale struck, injured by boat this week - Cape Cod Today | Earth Rangers' Science Content | Scoop.it
Cape Cod Today
Endangered right whale struck, injured by boat this week
Cape Cod Today
The Provincetown-based Center for Coastal Studies announced Friday that an endangered right whale was struck and injured by a boat on Cape Cod Bay.
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Missouri conservation center closely involved in effort to repopulate ... - Fox News

Missouri conservation center closely involved in effort to repopulate ... - Fox News | Earth Rangers' Science Content | Scoop.it
A secluded Missouri conservation center heralded for helping repopulate the wild with endangered wolves is tending to its latest puppy season — a ritual that this time has a bittersweet v...
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