Early Stage One Change and Continuity
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Dreamtime Story

This is a draft video for te Australian Museum for their Dreaming Stories. The performers are Gumaroy Newman, Eric Arthur Tamwoy and Norm Barsah. Video by Fi...
Tony Han's insight:

This is an excellent teaching and learning resoures to explore the themes of "Dreamtime story" in aboriginal Cutlture. This video is produced for Australian Museum and perfomed by three aborinal natives: Gumaroy Newman, Eric Arthur Tamwoy and Norm Barsah. 

The narration is done in first person with very simple languages and plenty of non-verbal languages to appeal to very young audiences. The 'dreamtime stories' allows students and teachers to explore the syllabus outcome 'Describes events or retells stories that demonstrate their own heritage and the heritage of others'. This can be evident through out the video, for instance, Newman, the first narrator gave the audiences a brief desciption of his rich culture heritage by stating that there are more than 300 tributes in Australia with more than 600 dialates and languages.

The "Dreamtime story" then allows teachers to achieved the syllabus outcome 'listens to Dreaming Stories', this can be evident when Newman gives his version of 'dreamtime'. In Newman's 'dreamtime', his culture believes that the land was all flat at the begning of the time, a 'garier' then came from the sky and gave birth to 'rivers, lights, trees and mountains'. The second narrator also gave his version of 'dreamtime' where his culture believe that Aboriginies were all 'mould' from native Australia and when their lives passed away they would returned to the land. This again exlores Aborigines' theme of 'belonging' and 'continity' with the land.

The "Dreamtime story" then explore the syllabus outcome 'identifies items relevant to the heritage of people from other culture'. The items here would refer ed to the songs each Aboriginal tribures sang. Accorfing to Newman, Aborigines tributes at different parts of Australia sang different songs, and by listened to them, Aborigines would have a rough idea of their location. This once again demonstrated to students the rich heritages Aborigines had and teachers can easily used this video resource to present to the class

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Education World: Grand Activities for Grandparents Day

This special day is observed on Sept. 9 this year. Use these creative activities to help students honor special relatives in their lives.

Via Cassie Wright
Tony Han's insight:

This is perfect learning and teaching activities that cover the outcome of the syllabus-'people who have met their needs in the past' This was a program organised by Diana B.Wolan, a graduate student who wish to brought children together with seniors in an unique way. The program used the 'Pet Control Project' where volunteers would visited nursing home on weekly bases with their pets to look after the senior and also complete a pet therapy project. Wolan seized this opportunities to brought children along with the 'pet control project' volunteers as well as their parents to visited the seniors in the nursing home. Some students even sceen their own pets to see if their pets were qualified to visit the nursing home. The staff member in the nursing house did a great job 'steered the children in the room' so that they were able to talked to seniors and the pets served as a catalyst. The experience was 'rewarding for everyone involved' because: it served as a superise for the seniors in the nursing home; it provides an opportunities for the seniors to share their past memories and heritages with the future of our society-the children; the children were also pleased that the seniors were showing interest at their pets which can served as a bridge to connect between the two generations since the pets were things that both generations can related; and finally if allows students to see the contribution of seniors citizen in the past who had met the needs of todays' world.

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Cassie Wright's curator insight, May 8, 2013 10:36 AM

During my 2nd year Prac, I saw the grandparents day being used with great success. Grandparents day, or just the involvement of some grandparents as guest speakers or visitors to the classroom is a powerful tool for teaching students about heritage and family stories. 

 

This resource includes explanations of the importance of these relationships, and heaps of ideas for activities on the day. The same activity I described in the Harmony Day Scoop also exists here: mapping where our grandparents come from in the world, and adding that global perspective. The site also contains links to other lists of ideas and worksheets. 

 

Having grandparents who can come into school is an amazing resource, and has the ability to link the classroom to the outside world. Grandparents could be asked to speak on the differences between this classroom and the one they used at school, about technological advances like the SmartBoard. Again, sensitivity is needed, and activities planned so that children without grandparents there on the day are included. Predominately, this day would take a lot of planning and resources to run smoothly. Quality teaching dictates that any lesson should be well prepared, and particularly one with so many people in the classroom. I would like to include classroom stations which Grandparents visit with their children, with activities such as comparisons of old and new classrooms can be completed by the student. 

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My place, your place | Global Education

My place, your place | Global Education | Early Stage One Change and Continuity | Scoop.it
Tony Han's insight:

This is fantastic site that provides teachers with resources to teach students, curriculum from a global prospective.This site contains 'teaching activities', digital learning resources such as videos and images that followed closely with the syllabus outcome CCES1-'Described events or retells stories that deomonstrate their own heritage and the heritage of others'

In the activity "People and the Environment", Women from Rajasthan, India were used as example where they had to spend time on daily bases to 'collected firewoods' in order to cook. This demonstrated to students about the cultural heritage of 'Women from Rajasthan' and their close bond with the environment they lived in for centuries. Through seven activities in this learning area,  students have the opportunities to explore the ways Rajasthan people used their natural resources for energy and living. Teachers can then encourage students to discuss the importances of preserving cultural heritage, environment and ultimately peoples' homes. Students will then be able to relate these idea to their own home and explore them from a global perspective. For instance in activity 4, students were told to 'take a photo of people cooking dinner' at their home and answer the following questions: 'who is doing the work' 'what energy is being used' 'would this be efficient use of fuel'. The question 'who is doing the cooking' will encourage students to understand the cultural of our society that the elderly look after children when they were young. The question 'what energy is being used' allowed students to explore what natural resources are being used and importance of preserving them in future. And the question 'would this be efficient use of fuel' supports a global perspective that explore themes like lands, cultural heritage, oceans and natural resources.

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My-Place-Classroom-Ideas.pdf

Tony Han's insight:

This is an excellent teaching resource for teachers to teach students about themes of 'change and continuity' which follows closely with syllabus outcomes CCES 1-'Describes events or retells stories that demonstrate their own heritage and the heritage of others' and subject matter 'people who have met their needs in the past'.

The Walker Books & Classroom Ideas uses the picture book "My Place" by Nadia Wheatley & Donna Rawlins to firstly created a frictional concept of family, origins and belonging. This fits perfectly with syllabus content overview-"Use a a variety of materials and texts, including photographs, picture books and oral presentations, to provide examples of families and change'.

In this case, teachers will firstly ask the students to look at front cover of the book before actually reading it and challenge them to think about the heritage background of this stories. Teachers can do this through use of discussion questions such as "What is the flag on the window of the blue house" and 'Do you know what the three colours represent?". After the first reading, students will be asked to think critically about the themes of 'beloning, family, change and continuity' and how they can be related to their own or others' family history. Teachers can go through critical questions like 'How do the family changes', 'Think about peoples' belonging to the place they live and each other'. Visually, teachers can encourage students to draw simple timeline that indicated the time each family member in the story appear and how they go on to 'change' or 'continoue to be the same'. Teachers will then encourage students to related the short story to their life stories, such as their families' origin, their family members, their own culture heritages. They can do this through the use of 'Diagram 2' on page 2, where students can draw or write elements of family that were significant to them such as pets or neibourhood and connected them together. All this provides great opportunities for students and teachers to explore the syllabus outcomes of 'Significant Events and People' such as 'encourage students to identify memories of their past and to recognise these as part of their heritage'.

Since 'My Place' explore themes of 'Indiginous Studies' and 'Cultural and Belonging', teachers can also encourage students to discovered ideas of 'Aboriginality' using this exercise. Teachers will encourage students to look up google maps for 'local sources of fresh water' and discussed with students on 'where Aboriginal people may traditional camped' to get their water sources as well as food. Teacher will then lead them to found about the culture of Aboriginal people such as 'traditionally different jobs women and men had in regard to food gathering and hunting'. This allows students and teacher to explore the syllabus outcome-'listens and talks about stories of other families and their heritage, including countries of orin and Aboriginally'.

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8ways - 2012 Best Aboriginal Pedagogy Practice

8ways - 2012 Best Aboriginal Pedagogy Practice | Early Stage One Change and Continuity | Scoop.it
Tony Han's insight:

This is an excellent teaching resources that demonstrated to teachers, diffrerent methods of teaching in Aboriginal perspectives. This fits very closely with the syllabus point CCES 1-'Described events or retells stories that demonstrate their own heritages and the heritages of others'

The heading '2012 Best Aboriginal Pedagogy Practice' uses many examples teachers from different public school across NSW to demonstrated how to teach Aboriginal Cultural heritages. For instance, Ed Storey, a teacher from Cambeltown East Public School demonstrated the ways he applied his 'art, writing, speaking and listening ' lessons to his students in order for them to see how a symbol can be used to represented a whole story and passed on to next generations. Their chosen topics were 'our family and where we came from', which fits in with a number of syllabus points such as 'use a variety of materials and texts, including photographs, picture books and oral presentations, to provide examples of families and change' . Storey firstly discussed methods of story telling using painting. He then applied the 'literacy description' each students wrote about their families to painting. The idea is that Storey tried to teach students to represent or retell stories through use of vareity of texts such as painting and symbols.

Katie Harris, a teacher from Ambarvale Public School explored the themes of 'belonging' with her Kindergarten class. This is very closely related to syllabus points such as 'listens to and talks about stories of other families and their heritage , including countries of origin and Aboriginality'. The centre theme Katie conveyed is that 'Aboriginals believed they belonged to the land' and that as future generations, students need to 'keep the land healthy' in order to sustain 'web of life'. Katie would first ask students to brainstorm ideas of 'Belonging' and write down idea on white board. The students then listen to an aboriginal poem that suggest Aboriginies' connections with the land. Students then put their hands on earth to demonstrated that they understood the message to take responsibilites and look after the land.

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