Early Stage 1 Teaching Resources- Roles, Rights and Responsibilities
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My Back to School Rights and Responsibilities

Kris Chikarovski's insight:

This is a site developed by UNICEF with particular relevance to the subject matter of rights and responsibilities in the classroom.  The resource features a "My Back to School Charter" which lists some basic rights of students such as the right to learn, have fun and feel safe.  Each right is adapted from the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.  The resource also lists a corresponding responsibility for each student linked to each right.

 

A possible teaching idea is to review the Charter with students and discuss these rights and responsibilities in the classroom and their implications for expectations and behaviour in the classroom.  Once the Charter was agreed to and understood by everyone, each student could put their name or palm print on the Charter which would then be displayed in the classroom as a poster.

 

A possible assessment task could involve students individually pictorially representing each right and responsibility, labelling each right and responsibility with simple key words and then matching each right to its corresponding responsibility.  Such a task would enhance students' understanding of each right and responsibility, reinforce the relatedness of each right to its corresponding responsibility and assist in the literacy development of students. (see outcome RES1.5 English K-6 Syllabus (Board of Studies NSW, 1998).

 

References

Board of Studies NSW (1998). English K-6 Syllabus.  Sydney: Board of Studies

 

 

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Children's rights education in Hampshire

Children's rights education in Hampshire | Early Stage 1 Teaching Resources- Roles, Rights and Responsibilities | Scoop.it
Kris Chikarovski's insight:

This is a UK site developed by the Hampshire Inspection and Advisory Service specifically for primary children dealing with the issues of rights, respect and responsibility, taken from the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.  The site includes links to resources for teachers including case studies of work undertaken in different schools that contain valuable teaching ideas.

 

The site also lists suggestions of and guidance on popular activities to engage students in the subject such as wants and universal needs, classroom wants and needs and the rights 'feely bag' especially suitable for younger students. This recognises the importance of student engagement in the learning process (Ewing, 2010, p. 60).

 

A lesson plan could be constructed around use of the rights feely bag.  This would involve the use of a soft 'feely bag' in which one object reflecting a basic right to say food or water or shelter is handed around, with children trying to guess what's in the bag.  The object would then be taken out of the bag and a discussion guided on what it is and what it makes them think of and is it important for all children.  This activity could be supported by a corresponding set of photographs and rights labels, also available through links on the site.  Children would be asked to look at the photographs and match the labels to the photographs.  The activity of labelling would support the development of the students' literacy skills in line with outcome RES1.5 in the English K-6 Syllabus (Board of Studies NSW, 1998a).

 

While the content has been developed from a UK primary curriculum perspective, the material accessible through the site aligns well with the NSW HSIE curriculum facilitating a focus by students on their own rights, responsibilities, needs and wants at home and in the classroom  (Outcome SSES1 and the subject dot point "roles, rights and responsibilities in the classroom and at home in the HSIE K-6 Syllabus (Board of Studies NSW, 1998b)).

 

References

Board of Studies NSW (1998a). English K-6 Syllabus.  Sydney: Board of Studies

 

Board of Studies NSW (1998b). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus.     Sydney: Board of Studies

 

Ewing, R. (2010). Literacy and the arts in Christie, F & Simpson, A., (Ed’s).  Literacy  and social responsibility: Multiple perspectives.  Equinox: London

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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World Vision Australia

Kris Chikarovski's insight:

This site maintained by World Vision Australia has been particularly selected as it offers a global perspective on the subject matter of roles, rights and responsibilities in the classroom and at home. 

 

It features a film clip, "A Day in the Life of Lucy" and presents an integrated range of activities developed for primary school children.  Lucy is a girl from a rural village in Uganda and the film clip shows a typical day in her life.  All activities relate in some way to the film clip. 

 

Of particular relevance to the subject matter of roles, rights and responsibilities in the classroom and at home, the site features sections directed at exploring such issues as Lucy's story, what is poverty, why is clean water so important, what does it mean to share and activities such as making a toy.

 

The 'making a toy' activity could be especially used for Early Stage 1 students.  It involves the students working in small groups to design and make a toy using only commonly available resources such as small blocks of wood, twigs, leaves, scraps of cardboard, wool cotton, elastic bands etc.  The activity is intended to assist the students in recognising that all children have the same needs and wants (e.g. to play and have fun) but that children in poorer countries can't just buy toys and need to be clever and creative in making their own toys from things available in their environment.  The students would then share as a group with the class what they had made and how they felt when making the toy and thinking about Lucy.  Such an activity would be engaging for students (Ewing, 2010, p. 60) and also involve learning by doing, building individual meaning in a situation and learning with and from others (Loughran, 2013, p.121).

 

References

Ewing, R. (2010). Literacy and the arts in Christie, F & Simpson, A., (Ed’s).  Literacy and social responsibility: Multiple perspectives.  Equinox: London

 

Loughran, J. (2013).  Pedagogy: Making sense of the complex relationship between teaching and learning.  Curriculum Inquiry, 43(1), 118-141.

 

 

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Finding My Magic - 2 Children's DVD Sets - Training Video | Training DVD | Management Training | Customer Service Training | Sales Training

Finding My Magic - 2 Children's DVD Sets - Training Video | Training DVD | Management Training | Customer Service Training | Sales Training | Early Stage 1 Teaching Resources- Roles, Rights and Responsibilities | Scoop.it
Kris Chikarovski's insight:

 

This is an excellent teaching resource specially designed for primary aged children including early stage 1 students, that utilises a series of 12 animated episodes to teach children about their rights and responsibilities.  The animated format makes it engaging and accessible to kindergarten students in particular. Each episode is also supported by a workbook that includes lesson notes and discussion questions.

 

The resource was particular chosen because of episode 12, "Know My Rights" which deals with the issue of the Stolen Generation.  However each episode presents engaging stories about children's rights and responsibilities reflecting a different right from the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.

 

The subject matter of the resource aligns with the learning outcome SSES1 in the HSIE K-6 Syllabus (Board of Studies, NSW, 1998) because it will facilitate students identifying their own needs for safety and support of family and how these needs were interfered with in respect of aboriginal children.  This links with the subject matter of learning about roles, rights and responsibilities at home.

 

A possible lesson plan could include showing the video, leading a guided discussion on the issues raised, prompting children to identify the rights and responsibilities conveyed and doing a reflective drawing on a scene from the episode. In addition, such lessons could be scheduled around the observance of National Sorry Day to add further context and meaning for this Day.

 

In terms of the selection criteria for evaluating material relevant to Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander people, the material was produced post 1980 and presents the information in a balanced way, was prepared in consultation with Cathy Freeman and her Foundation, is a simple but accurate portrayal of the sensitive issue suitable for an early stage 1 audience and does not deal with information of a secret or sacred nature.

 

References

Board of Studies NSW (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus.  Sydney: Board of Studies

 

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RightsED: Child Rights - Index

RightsED: Child Rights - Index | Early Stage 1 Teaching Resources- Roles, Rights and Responsibilities | Scoop.it
Kris Chikarovski's insight:

This site is maintained by the Australian Human Rights Commission and provides access to a range of resources and activities that can be used to assist Early Stage 1 students to learn about roles, rights and responsibilities in the classroom and at home.  The site draws on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and also offers links to a child friendly version of this Convention.

 

Activities/resources available form the site include an activity sheet on rights and wants, a resource sheet of human rights images, a rights and wants worksheet as well as activity sheet and resource sheet suitable for older students dealing with the issue of children in Australian immigration detention centres. 

 

One possible teaching idea for early Stage 1 students involves the use of the "Rights and Wants Activity Sheet".  This sheet involves the use of picture cards where the students working in collaborative groups, discuss what possible rights could be depicted in the pictures.  These are all recorded on the board and then the class discusses which are the most important rights and why.  Corresponding responsibilities can also be discussed.  Such collaborative group work, practical tasks, problem solving, and student sharing helps motivate students and develop higher order thinking (Bobis, Anderson, Martin, & Way, 2011).

 

A possible assessment task could involve children choosing the right that they think is most important to them and then drawing a picture that illustrates this right and then sharing it with the class.

 

References

Bobis, J., Anderson, J., Martin, J., & Way J. (2011).  A model for mathematics instruction to  enhance student motivation and engagement.  In D Brahier (Ed.), Motivation and Disposition: Pathways to Learning Mathematics, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Seventy-third Yearbook (Chap 2, pp.31-42)

 

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