Early Stage 1 HSIE- CUES1- Students in ES1 will learn about events shared with class members and with families
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Early Stage 1 HSIE- CUES1- Students in ES1 will learn about events shared with class members and with families
Early Stage 1 HSIE- CUES1- Students in ES1 will learn about events shared with class members and with families
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A is for Aunty by Elaine Russell

A is for Aunty by Elaine Russell | Early Stage 1 HSIE- CUES1- Students in ES1 will learn about events shared with class members and with families | Scoop.it
A is for Aunty: , by Elaine Russell, a Trade paperback from ABC Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers
Elessa Mavridis's insight:

The book ‘A is for Aunty’ was inspired by Elaine Russell’s childhood memories of living on the mission at Murrin Bridge. The book uses the letters of the Alphabet to sequence the day-to-day events of the author, for example “C is for Canoes” describes the activity of making their own canoes out of scrap tin. The book is useful when addressing the syllabus indicator of ‘Events shared with class members and with families’ as it offers an Aboriginal perspective and an insight into the daily events of someone who belongs to the Aboriginal culture, and follows Aboriginal traditions. It demonstrates to children the differences yet the similarities between their childhood events and the childhood events of others.

 

When assessing the book using the ‘Selection criteria for the evaluation of Aboriginal texts’ it appears to be authentic, accurate, appropriate (as it was created by a person of Aboriginal heritage), and does not appear to include content of a secret or sacred nature. Moreover, this source is even more useful as not only does it effectively address this particular HSIE indicator, it has both literacy (alphabet) and numeracy (day sequencing) links, and therefore can be used to address the outcomes and indicators of another syllabus.

 

http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/linkages/IntegratedUnits/aboriginal/mathsmob_intro.html

 

This link specifically demonstrates how the source ‘A is for Aunty’ can be used to approach certain numeracy outcomes for early stage 1 (learning sequence 2). As an example, the concept of ‘Day’ and ‘Night’ can be explored using the book, while addressing an outcome of the Mathematics syllabus that requires early stage 1 students to use concrete materials to support their conclusions (ES1.4).

 

References:

 

Board of Studies (2013). 

http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/linkages/IntegratedUnits/aboriginal/mathsmob_intro.html Retrieved April 17, 2013.

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Happy Birthday - multi language

International youtube collab made by kartiv2. http://www.youtube.com/kartiv2 Thanks to all my youtube friends who took a part in this video - you guys are aw...
Elessa Mavridis's insight:

Most schools in Australia are multicultural, with children from a range of different backgrounds that speak a variety of languages at home. Children will therefore, have a variety of traditional events that they celebrate that are different to the traditions that others follow. It is however important to additionally demonstrate to students that there are events that we all share, and celebrate together, for example ‘The Birthday’. A way of illustrating this commonality and sense of ‘humanness’ despite differences, is to celebrate common and shared events in a multicultural/multilingual way.

 

This link shows the happy birthday song being sung in many different languages, exhibiting that people all around the world celebrate their birthday, and sing a birthday song.

 

As a teaching idea, it would be engaging and inclusive if, when singing happy birthday to a child, the class would sing happy birthday in a variety of different languages, including most importantly a language associated with the child’s nationality or heritage. The happy birthday song is usually quite repetitive, so it shouldn’t be too difficult for the students to grasp, however having the teacher remind them before they sing as a class (along with the video_, would be constructive for the students.

 

As children’s birthdays are at different times of the year, it may be beneficial at the start of the year to have the children learn what month their birthday is in, display the birthdays on the wall of the classroom, and surround them with multilingual versions of the phrase ‘Happy Birthday’. This would create a foundation for later learning about shared events such as ‘The Birthday’, and class activities such as the singing of the ‘Happy Birthday’ song.    

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Kids Planet Discovery - games and videos to travel and learn about the world's geography, nature and cultures

Get Kids Planet Discovery - games and videos to travel and learn about the world's geography, nature and cultures on the App Store. See screenshots and ratings, and read customer reviews.
Elessa Mavridis's insight:

Depending on the resources available in particular schools, the ‘Kids Planet Discovery’ app is an engaging and interactive way for students to learn about global perspectives, traditions and cultural diversity. The app (that can be used on both Ipads and Iphones) has a large variety of activities including, puzzles, memory games, traditional dress ups, identify the non-native animal, find the intruder, and much more. More relevent to the CUES1 outcome, the application has useful and age appropriate cultural videos from around the world that could be used to introduce students to various cultural traditions. Such traditions include the Maori Haka (War Dance) in New Zealand, Independence Day in the United States of America, the Holi Festival of Colours in Gurajat India, and the Zulu Wedding Dance in South Africa.

 

This digital resource specifically addresses the CUES1 outcome as it illustrates to children that there are events and traditions that other class members or people in other parts of the world may participate in, that differ to the events that they celebrate with their own families. It offers a global perspective of culture and tradition, outside that of the classroom, as we should not only learn, respect and value the experiences of those within our immediate environment, but notice that there is even greater diversity outside of our Australian and multicultural school community. Furthermore, it is beneficial as it also allows the children to discover that the indigenous people of the USA, and New Zealand, differ from the indigenous people of Australia.

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The Classroom Bookshelf: Mirror

The Classroom Bookshelf: Mirror | Early Stage 1 HSIE- CUES1- Students in ES1 will learn about events shared with class members and with families | Scoop.it
Elessa Mavridis's insight:

‘Mirror’ by Jeannie Baker (2010) is a visually stunning, heart warming, children’s picture book that simultaneously depicts the day-to-day lives of a family in Australia and a family in Morocco, North Africa. The story of the two families is told mainly through images, with one family ‘mirroring’ the other, however what little writing the book has can be read in English from left to right, and in Arabic from right to left. This story aims to address the syllabus outcome and indicator (CUES1) by demonstrating to children (of any stage) that although there is cultural diversity and difference, there are events and activities that they share with all families “no matter where they live” (Baker, 2010).

 

It has been suggested by Newmann and Wehlage (1993) that the pedagogy of ‘Active and Experiential Learning’ is most useful when approaching the curriculum, as it accesses a ‘higher order of thinking’, deeper ‘knowledge’, a sense of ‘connectedness to the world’, ‘substantive conversation’, and ‘social support for student achievement’.  The ‘classroom bookshelf’ link provides creative ideas to assist teachers in planning lessons around the themes and the main message of this particular book (Baker, 2010), and in particular provides ideas for lesson plans that have an ‘active and experiential’ approach to student learning. For example, the activity “A Day in Our Lives” would allow children in early stage one to actively consider the concept of similarity between diverse cultures, through sequencing their day-to-day activities using a storyboard. In this way, their personal experiences are shared, and they experience others lives and events also. It is hoped that through this pedagogy students will develop at the very least a concept of the global community, and their individual connectedness to it.

 

References:

 

Newmann, F., Wehlage, G. 1993. Five Standards of Authentic Learning. Educational Leadership, April, 8-12

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Elessa Mavridis's insight:

This program allows for children of Early Stage 1 to learn about their own characteristics, backgrounds and cultural traditions as being different to the characteristics, backgrounds and cultural traditions of others in the classroom. After general class discussion about the topic and an introduction into the notion that people come from different backgrounds, enjoy different things to one another, and celebrate different events, students can begin their profiles by creating a digital avatar of themselves.

 

The program offers teachers the opportunity to print the avatars as a profile, under which children can write sentences to describe themselves. These descriptions ca be written independently or scribed, depending on the level of ability of the student. Teachers could adjust the profile to have sentences that require a one word answer such as “I was born in ______”, “My Mum was born in_________”, My Dad was born in ________”, “My birthday is in ________”“My favourite food is_________”, “My favourite celebration is _______.”

 

Through this task children learn the names of others in the class, reflect on the events that they all share and celebrate eg birthdays, and learn that they may celebrate some events individually with their families as a cultural tradition eg Hannukah.

 

This activity can therefore also be considered as a potential assessment opportunity for teachers who wish to assess children’s understanding of identities and cultural diversity (NSW Board of Studies, 2007, p. 44). It could be used as either a formative assessment for teachers to learn what the children already know, or a summative assessment, for the teachers to assess what the children have learnt after teaching, instruction and class discussions. 

 

References:

 

NSW Board of Studies. (2003). Human Society and Its Environment K-6. Sydney

 

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