Early Stage 1 HSIE
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Early Stage 1 HSIE
A teacher resource created with NSW HSIE Syllabus Topic: CCES1 Describes events or retells stories that demonstrate their own heritage and the heritage of others. With the Subject matter: Changes to people and places in their neighbourhood. Useful websites and lesson ideas included
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The Rocks Dreaming - Primary

The Rocks Dreaming - Primary | Early Stage 1 HSIE | Scoop.it
Sydney Harbour Foreshore Authority (SHFA) - A statutory authority responsible for management of prime Sydney Harbour foreshore land between Garden Island and White Bay.
Anneli Cole's insight:

This link is to The Rocks Dreaming primary level excursion. The program itself is tailored to the HSIE NSW curriculum.

The excursion itself is focused on the connection between the history of the Rocks before non-Indigenous contact and the modern day. This has very obvious connections with the outcome I am working with and is pedagogically significant in that it is an area the students would be familiar and therefore more likely to be invested in (McInerney etal, 2010).

I would recommend further contact with the center and questioning to ascertain the level of input from actual members of the Indigenous community in the excursion activities. Being a government funded and endorsed program one would assume the information would be balanced, sensitive and accurate with input from the Indigenous community.

The website does provide some worksheets for use in the classroom either prior or after the excursion, there are not any for use on the excursion itself. Therefore teachers need to be more mindful about assessment.

Assessment: in order to assess the students on their understanding of the similarities and differences between The Rocks today and The Rocks as they were I would separate the class in two groups; one group is to draw or paint their impression of what The Rocks would have looked as described in the tour and the other half draw or paint The Rocks as they know them today. Encourage the students to use things such as grass, sticks, paddlepop sticks and the like to add extra texture and depth to the pictures.

I would then have the two halves find a partner in the opposite group and compare their paintings. Assess the students based on their understandings of the differences and similarities between the images.

Literacy: have the partners share with the class one major difference between the past and present day Rocks to practice meet talking and listening outcomes in the NSW syllabus.

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My Place Website

Anneli Cole's insight:

This website is based on there being a house located in inner Sydney and the various occupants who have lived in them over the years. This resource, in and of itself, is probably better matched to stage three, given the text heavy nature, however with extra teacher guidance, it is possible to tailor both the content and activities to Early Stage One.

The focus for the activity would be on Wawuri the Indigenous girl from 1788 compared to how a student in the classroom would live now. She provides an Indigenous perspective without passing judgment on how life was conducted, she is not depicted as inferior or as one to be admired as the “noble savage”.

As a class, on the Smartboard walk the students through the campsite, provide simplified, shortened explanations for the various objects and their functions. Where possible have actual replicas of these items so that students are able to touch them and “make them real” (Krause et al, 2003). Be careful to ensure none of the items are sacred or inappropriate to have in the classroom without an elder.

For assessment: Bring into the classroom the corresponding objects (within reason) in the modern day home. In groups of four students role play comparing and contrasting as both themselves and Wawuri the modern and past household items. Assess the students on their ability to compare and contrast objects from the past to modern day equivalents demonstrating an understanding of change in their own lives.

Literacy Links: This activity has links with the English curriculum, in regards to listening and speaking. Students engage in this lesson by making connections to their own lives through the use of objects they experience and use daily (McInerney etal, 2010).

 

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Australian Bureau of Statistics

Anneli Cole's insight:

This website is meant to be a teacher resource rather than one for the students to use. It is very dry and text heavy, however it provides useful data for minor analysis for teachers to provide with students about specific areas in which students live. For this activity teachers need to focus on ONE specific piece of data from across several different census to be interpreted.

For the activity present on the Smartboard, pictorially what statistic has changed the most over the last few years in the local area. This could be a difference in the number of older people versus younger or the number of ethnicities (being careful with race issues as to avoid potential bullying).

Promote and scaffold a discussion as to how a change to the demographics in the neighborhood contributes to changes in services and the like in the surrounding areas. For example an increase in children might have led to an increase in childcare facilities or an increase in migration from particular countries may have led to an increase in the number of small businesses in the area. The discussion may take sometime however it is important that teachers refrain from taking control of the discussion, guiding rather than lecturing (McInereny etal, 2010). To aid discussion, display photos of the neighbourhood and ask students to name what they see.

Assessment: monitor participation in the whole class discussion, focus questions on student’s understanding on how the various demographics affect their day to day life.

Literacy and Numeracy: Links to the interpretation of data and visual literacy as well as talking and listening skills are present in this activity.

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The journey of the Hong Hai: design a museum exhibition

Anneli Cole's insight:

The journey of Hong Hai is a short, interactive activity, based the story of a boat full of asylum seekers which landed in Australia from Vietnam in 1978. The issue of asylum seekers is a complex, topical one and the actual web activity is probably of higher primary age (stage three) than is desired.

This website provides a global perspective on a national issue, inviting the player to understand a little bit more what it would be like to be an immigrant to Australia. It may be beneficial, to have a parent or a grandparent who has immigrated themselves share with the class their experiences.

A whole class activity would be to take the students through the initial stages of the game, highlighting as the boat is navigated (by a student preferably) how tricky the journey was.

Afterwards produce a globe (Yule, 2013) and have children ask their parents when and from where their family came out to Australia and mark that country and date on the globe with the child’s photo. This activity gives students ownership and input into the lesson (Krause etal, 2003)

It’s important that from the outset the teacher is positive and affirming every student’s heritage and celebratory of their different stories.

Assessment for this activity would be to have students write a short paragraph about where their family immigrated from and provide a fact about that particular country.

Literacy links: students practice writing skills.

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National Museum of Australia - The Cobb & Co coach – Flash interactive

National Museum of Australia - The Cobb & Co coach – Flash interactive | Early Stage 1 HSIE | Scoop.it
Years Foundation–2
Australian history, geography
Anneli Cole's insight:

This website presents students with a very simple comparison between how various aspects of life are different now to how they were when Australia was first colonized.

Use this activity as an introduction to a series of lessons, investigating transport, and the changes to transport over time. Survey the students as to how they got to school that morning, list responses (bus, car, bicycle, walk etc) and create a picture graph representing the results. Early Stage One has minimal experience with graphing so the teacher will need to model this procedure; talking the class through it and having them participate in minor ways so they still feel ownership (Krause, 2003).

Compare present day transportation to that of the past by asking their parents and grandparents how they got to school. On the collection of this data, create two new graphs and display them one next to the other. Have the class discuss observations asking prompting questions such as “why might there be more cars in the how I get to school chart than in the others?” , “how did most people’s grandparents get to and from school?” This conversation will really need to be very carefully scaffolded (McInerney etal, 2010) as there will be students who struggle with the concept of reading a graph

Assessment: in order to assess this activity, monitor student participation during whole class discussion, additionally have each student compose a sentence explaining the differences in transport over three generations.

Numeracy links are obvious, interpreting data (DSE1.1) and literacy links include talking and listening as well as writing for the assessment.

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