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Teaching Children to Calm Themselves

Teaching Children to Calm Themselves | Early Learning and Literacy | Scoop.it

Experiencing neglect, severe stress or sudden separation at a young age can be traumatizing, and inhibit a child’s ability to make good decisions and work through problems.


Via Andrea Zeitz
Barbara Hunter's insight:

If we can catch children at this age and help them to develop self-regulation skills, they will have a chance to break the cycle plaguing many in society today.  This is a program to watch for long-term success.

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Early Learning and Literacy
Information about early literacy skills and the red flags that can be the first indication of learning problems.
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Rescooped by Barbara Hunter from Visual*~*Revolution
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Teaching Children to Calm Themselves

Teaching Children to Calm Themselves | Early Learning and Literacy | Scoop.it

Experiencing neglect, severe stress or sudden separation at a young age can be traumatizing, and inhibit a child’s ability to make good decisions and work through problems.


Via Andrea Zeitz
Barbara Hunter's insight:

If we can catch children at this age and help them to develop self-regulation skills, they will have a chance to break the cycle plaguing many in society today.  This is a program to watch for long-term success.

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Rescooped by Barbara Hunter from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Is 'Dyslexia'A Meaningless Label? Research rears its head and it's Deja vu all over again!

Is 'Dyslexia'A Meaningless Label? Research rears its head and it's  Deja vu all over again! | Early Learning and Literacy | Scoop.it

"For millions of parents, a dyslexia diagnosis that not only unlocks the door to extra help, but also allows them to understand why their child has problems reading. So it is no surprise that a suggestion the term is overused and should be ditched has been greeted with howls of protest.

 

But once the initial furore has died down, it is worth wondering whether affixing a label makes any real difference. Perhaps we should spend more time making sure children get the help they need than working out whether they fall into a neat category."


Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, March 1, 10:21 AM

Apparently the lesson here is that no label accurate or inaccurate is meaningless--although many cause damage. The label dyslexia certainly helped me understand the challenges that print presented to me as a child in school and even as an adult now; but I am willing to listen to anyone with more information.  We should not wait for labels to provide children the support and instruction they need in order to succeed in school. Dyslexia describes but does not define me. We throw lots of labels at lots of children that begin with “dis” intimating that something is not “normal”: dyslexia, dysgraphia, dysthymic, disruptive, disorganized, dyspraxic…etc,. I blogged about the use of “dyslexia” as a diagnostic category in the DSM 5:

 http://lawrenceschool.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/labels/

 

I can agree that some are more accurate than others—but I am “disgusted” that we “dismiss” evidence that would prevent reading failure in primary school—“dismayed” that we “dismantle” a child’s self worth and confidence with labels like “disabled” when the problem is mistaken policy and practice in the instruction of reading. Barbara Bateman many years ago labeled that “dysteachia”.

So I ask simply the adults in this debate stop talking.  I have often wondered to myself and out loud how much of this research that we seem to gnaw like dogs chewing bones actually ever benefits the children it is ostensibly aimed at helping.

Can’t we start applying what we already know and understand about the science of teaching reading? Do we really need fancy psychological reports? Must we wait 2-4 years for a child to fail before we decide to apply the settled science that tells us how to teach children to read?  Can someone explain the hysteria about labels and the complacency about failure? What ever happened to “Do no harm”? --Lou

 

 

Excerpt: "...It is entirely understandable that parents whose children struggle to read should look for an explanation. It is also understandable that they feel dyslexia is a better label than the alternative. For the children themselves, a diagnosis offers reassurance that they are not ‘stupid’.

But our desire to affix a label to reading difficulties gets in the way of children getting the help they need. Rather than wait until a child has been diagnosed – and then giving them the standard interventions offered to dyslexics – we should focus on making sure support is more closely tied to their needs. Children who struggle to read should not need a diagnosis before they get help..."

Lon Woodbury's curator insight, March 1, 2:21 PM

This raises a helpful question.  I think that with increased capability, including digital type, we are getting closer to developing education methods that "individualize,' that is, meets the individual needs of each child whether there is a label on them or not. -Lon

Rescooped by Barbara Hunter from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Video: NCLD Asks, ‘How Much Do You Know About Dyslexia?’

Video: NCLD Asks, ‘How Much Do You Know About Dyslexia?’ | Early Learning and Literacy | Scoop.it
Our team at the National Center for Learning Disabilities visited Madison Square Park in New York City to separate fact from fiction when it comes to LD.

Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, November 25, 2013 5:20 PM

Nice idea--I would have liked questions that actually complicated people's thinking instead of defaulting to the old presumptions.  I think it was Margaret Rawson who said that the issue for dyslexics was not ignorance--but presumed knowledge.  Perhaps it is both!--Lou

Rescooped by Barbara Hunter from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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TY! @cdcowen for: Visual System Differences in Dyslexia Do Not Cause Reading Problems

TY! @cdcowen for: Visual System Differences in Dyslexia Do Not Cause Reading Problems | Early Learning and Literacy | Scoop.it

"One by one, science is resolving mysteries, settling disputes, and challenging assumptions surrounding dyslexia, while delving ever deeper into its complexities. The last two decades have produced a remarkable body of work, including the breakthrough findings from Georgetown University mentioned in this article. Examiner readers and those who follow dyslexia-related issues via social media have unprecedented, almost real-time access to this exciting research as it unfolds.

The challenge, of course, is to translate this body of work into effective practices and policies that actually make a difference in the lives of people with dyslexia. In this regard, the work of The International Dyslexia Association (IDA) is more important than ever. IDA is dedicated to both the study and treatment of dyslexia and related difficulties learning to read and write...." 


Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, July 22, 2013 3:25 PM

Carolyn writes for the IDA Examiner. I highly recommend you read her blogs and follow her. She gets this exactly right: the challenge to us all is to determine how we get research like this into the classrooms, clinics and education classes and into  pre- and in- service teacher preparation curriculum. --Lou

Excerpt:

 

By Carolyn D. Cowen

" The jury is in on yet another long-standing debate about dyslexia. The verdict is important and nuanced.

The phonological basis for dyslexia’s hallmark difficulties in learning to read has been established for decades as the predominant explanation of dyslexia. Nevertheless, another explanation—a weakness in processing visual stimuli—has persisted and remains a subject of debate. Now, a new study provides strong evidence about the role of the brain’s visual system in dyslexia.

This study, published on line June 6 in the journal, Neuron, found that while a specific difference can be seen in the brain’s visual system in subjects with dyslexia, this difference is not the culprit behind the reading difficulties. More likely, this difference is the consequence of less reading experience. And, to paraphrase Shakespeare, saying that children with dyslexia have less reading experience than their peers is like saying that night follows day. 

This breakthrough study found that, yes, people with dyslexia do have subtle visual system differences—as many of those with dyslexia and their teachers have long reported—but, no, these visual differences do not cause the condition and its associated reading difficulties. In fact, the findings suggest, it may be the other way around; reading difficulties discourage reading, which in turn, probably means that children with dyslexia do not experience the same “reading-induced change in the visual system” that is seen in typical readers.

You may be wondering what this means for intervention. Hold that thought while we dig deeper into the research.

Controlling for Reading Experience: Visual System Differences Not Seen

Researchers used functional brain imaging to show less activity in the “magnocellular” visual system in children with dyslexia compared to non-dyslexic children matched on age. However, this difference no longer was seen when children with dyslexia were compared to younger, non-dyslexics matched on reading ability, suggesting that the observed difference might be tied to reading level. Georgetown University, where the study was conducted, provided a press releasethat sheds additional light on the findings:

“Our results do not discount the presence of this specific type of visual deficit,” says senior authorGuinevere Eden, Ph.D., director for theCenter for the Study of Learning atGeorgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) and past-president ofThe International Dyslexia Association. “In fact, our results confirm that differences do exist in the visual system of children with dyslexia, but these differences are the end-product of less reading, when compared with typical readers, and are not the cause of their struggles with reading.”

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11 Amazing TED Talks About Children And Early Childhood Education

RT @PNCGrowUpGreat: Check out these insightful @TED_TALKS on the amazing potential of early childhood education #ECE http://t.co/vI71FD4891
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5 keys to boosting literacy - DesMoinesRegister.com

5 keys to boosting literacy - DesMoinesRegister.com | Early Learning and Literacy | Scoop.it
5 keys to boosting literacy
DesMoinesRegister.com
Early language development is a key predictor of future academic success, but not all children enter school with the verbal skills they need to learn to read.
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Understanding Numbers and Counting Skills in Preschoolers

Understanding Numbers and Counting Skills in Preschoolers | Early Learning and Literacy | Scoop.it
How can you measure your child’s development in numbers and counting — early math skills? The questions and tips that follow will help you understand what math awareness and skills your child should have — and how you can support his development.
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Rescooped by Barbara Hunter from Decoding Dyslexia NC
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Dyslexia Revealed - In Their Own Words

Hear right from the people who understand dyslexia best: a teacher, a neuropsychologist, a former public school superintendent of schools who now is the head...

Via Decoding Dyslexia NC
Barbara Hunter's insight:

Hearing it from the mouths of individuals who experience a reading learning disability should compel schools to move to "change the environment " in order for them to show what they know.  Why is this so difficult to execute?

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Lou Salza's curator insight, February 23, 9:01 AM

Let's get our language straight!--Lou

"The limits of my language are the limits of my mind. All I know is what I have words for. "
Wittgenstein—Philosophical Investigations, 1953

 

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Phonemic Awareness Information and Activities

Frequently asked questions about phonemic awareness and phonological awareness
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Rescooped by Barbara Hunter from Best Practice in Early Childhood Education
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“Make Good Decisions” – A Powerful Way to Say Goodbye

“Make Good Decisions” – A Powerful Way to Say Goodbye | Early Learning and Literacy | Scoop.it
Changing the world 3 words at a time.

Via Cindy Maloff Terebush, CPC, CYPFC
Barbara Hunter's insight:

Conversation starter and an interesting metacognitive way to work on self-regulation skills.

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Cindy Maloff Terebush, CPC, CYPFC's curator insight, May 30, 2013 4:08 PM

Share this article and join me in a quest to change our parting words to each other and our children.

Laura Fusselman Frenz's curator insight, May 30, 2013 4:41 PM

Amazing advice!

Kirstie's curator insight, June 18, 2013 6:27 AM

Really good points made

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Learning together: Preschool program also helps parents - Green Bay Press Gazette

Learning together: Preschool program also helps parents - Green Bay Press Gazette | Early Learning and Literacy | Scoop.it
Learning together: Preschool program also helps parents
Green Bay Press Gazette
Julie Stiles plays with her children Addison (middle), 2, and Andrew, 4, during one of the APPL classes at Cormier School and Early Learning Center in Ashwaubenon.
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8 Ways To Cultivate Empathy In Kids - Forbes

8 Ways To Cultivate Empathy In Kids - Forbes | Early Learning and Literacy | Scoop.it
8 Ways To Cultivate Empathy In Kids
Forbes
A: My work at The Early Learning Foundation focuses on early learning success.
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