Early Brain Development
8.5K views | +0 today
Follow
Early Brain Development
Creating awareness of the impact we can all easily have on optimal brain development for ALL children.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

Moving Smart: THE KINETIC SCALE: Beyond Gross & Fine Motor

Moving Smart: THE KINETIC SCALE: Beyond Gross & Fine Motor | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Deborah McNelis, M.Ed's insight:

Movement is at the very core of how children develop intellectually, emotionally, socially, and of course, physically. Here at Moving Smart we foster children's naturally move-to-learn style while helping parents and teachers understand the comprehensive benefits of all that wiggling!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

Teacher Tom: I Don't Need To "Teach" Them

Teacher Tom: I Don't Need To "Teach" Them | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Reflections on teaching and learning from preschoolers
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

Ten Steps to Unconditional Love

Ten Steps to Unconditional Love | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it

We all know that children require unconditional love to thrive. But how many of us feel capable of giving it?  We can't, quite simply, give something we don't have inside.  Loving your child starts with loving yourself.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

Reading at five: Why?

Reading at five: Why? | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it

"For 40 years I have searched without success for studies that support the notion that reading at five is a helpful step for long-term success in school. A recent doctoral thesis confirmed the absence of such evidence."

Deborah McNelis, M.Ed's insight:

Let's realize that children's brains need to develop well prior to pushing academics!

more...
Terry Doherty's curator insight, October 7, 2013 1:52 PM

Feeling pressured to have your 7-year-old read Harry Potter? A new study confirmst what others before have shown: it is neither realistic nor productive.

 

This article in Seen Magazine explains the ins and outs of learning to read. What I love most is that it shows parents what reasonable goals and milestones look like. 

Connie Anderson's curator insight, October 7, 2013 9:20 PM

Did you learn to love learning in kindergarten? What did you love? What will happen to our nation's early learners if we replace a play environment with an academic and highly structured one?

Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

Teaching boys to become strong learners

Teaching boys to become strong learners | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
As an elementary school principal in Simcoe, Ont., Edmond Dixon saw countless underachieving young boys pass by his desk.
Deborah McNelis, M.Ed's insight:

"When boys are young, their brains have a greater capacity to perceive and use movement, but are less capable than girls at mastering oral language skills. By the age of six or seven, boys start getting testosterone jolts and become more competitive. When they fail, say by getting a bad mark on a test or getting scolded by a teacher, boy’s testosterone levels drop. Repeated failures, said Dixon, cause boys to lose interest in school because the loss of testosterone leaves them self-conscious."

more...
Lon Woodbury's curator insight, August 20, 2013 9:02 PM

an important point here is that with early failure in schools, boys lose testosterone, which undermines future potential achievement.  This  in general seems to imply the traditional approach to education is bad for boys on a hormonal level. -Lon

Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

Why Playing Outdoors Makes Children Smarter : Portland Family Magazine

Why Playing Outdoors Makes Children Smarter : Portland Family Magazine | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
uthor and clinical psychologist Kay Redfield Jamison writes, “Children need the freedom and time to play. Play is not a luxury. Play is a necessity.” It is through unstructured, open-ended creative play that children learn the ways of the world. While playing outside, children explore with all their senses, they witness new life, they create imaginary worlds and they negotiate with each other to create a playful environment. - See more at: http://www.portlandfamily.com/posts/20-reasons-why-playing-outdoors-makes-children-smarter/#sthash.4QqJoNOc.dpuf
Deborah McNelis, M.Ed's insight:

Excellent post!!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

A new study shows why you should get the kids to bed on time

A new study shows why you should get the kids to bed on time | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Going to bed at a regular time every night could give your child's brain a boost, recent research shows.
Deborah McNelis, M.Ed's insight:

Researchers at University College London found that when 3-year-olds have a regular bedtime they perform better on cognitive tests administered at age 7 than children whose bedtimes weren't consistent. The findings represent a new twist on an expanding body of research showing that inadequate sleep in children and adolescents hurts academic performance and overall health.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

Tech Addicts Are Getting Younger And Younger

Tech Addicts Are Getting Younger And Younger | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Park Jung-in, an 11-year-old South Korean, sleeps with her Android smartphone instead of a teddy bear.
more...
Lon Woodbury's curator insight, July 9, 2013 2:42 PM

Images of Zombie Apocalypse come to mind. :) -Lon

Dawn Matheson's comment, July 14, 2013 7:41 PM
This is just so sad ... where are the parents?
Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

Feds Emphasize 7-to-1 Investment Return for Early Childhood Education

Feds Emphasize 7-to-1 Investment Return for Early Childhood Education | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Secretary Duncan spoke with the PPIC on Friday and stressed the federal push for early childhood education as the priority of the education department.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

Maternal Warmth Doesn't Make Spanking Less Harmful

Maternal Warmth Doesn't Make Spanking Less Harmful | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Thanks to the marvelous discoveries in neuroscience, parents are beginning to understand the danger of toxic stress on their child’s developing brain.  When I was a young mother 25 years ago, the o...
Deborah McNelis, M.Ed's insight:

"It is really important to understand that the first five years of life is when children are most vulnerable to stress.  When we use harsh discipline, we risk interfering with the proper development of the regulatory system.  The long-term risks are profound."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

Malnutrition Kills Over 3 Million Children Annually Worldwide

Malnutrition Kills Over 3 Million Children Annually Worldwide | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
According to a report in the Lancet more than 3 million children die each year because of malnutrition, accounting for more than half of all deaths in children under 5.
more...
David Hain's curator insight, June 7, 2013 2:33 AM

It's 2013 folks - this cannot be allowed to continue...!  Not the usual positive post but sometimes people change because of discomfort.

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, June 7, 2013 10:05 AM

What ways can technology help here?

Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

The Unexpected Ways a Fetus Is Shaped by a Mother's Environment

The Unexpected Ways a Fetus Is Shaped by a Mother's Environment | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
New research on first impressions
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

Scientists link autism with lack of gut bacteria

Scientists link autism with lack of gut bacteria | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Mice raised without bacteria in the gut showed distinctly autistic patterns of behaviour, choosing to interact with objects more than other mice, scientists at University College Cork (UCC) have found.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

Parenting Children & Teens with Reactive Attachment Disorder: PARENTING CHILDREN & TEENS WITH REACTIVE ATTACHMENT DISORDER

Parenting Children & Teens with Reactive Attachment Disorder: PARENTING CHILDREN & TEENS WITH REACTIVE ATTACHMENT DISORDER | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Deborah McNelis, M.Ed's insight:

A word or two about brain growth and change. The brain adapts to experience, not to information. In this digital age, the tendency to overvalue the impact of information itself, disconnected from experience, has mushroomed. As H.L. Mencken put it, “For every problem there is a solution which is neat, believable, and wrong.” Information is not useless, but by itself, it does not fundamentally lead to change in kids, or adults, for that matter. If it did, you probably would not be reading this right now. The mental health of kids in the United States has been declining gradually, but steadily, since the 1950’s. All of our digital abundance has done nothing to reverse that trend. So, the message is, to facilitate growth in your kids, give them new experience, not simply new information.

more...
Creative Counseling's curator insight, June 9, 2015 8:02 PM

Lots of relevant information. Seems that it would be beneficial if working in tandem with a counselor and a behavioral worker. 

Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

The Real Reasons Toddlers Push Limits

The Real Reasons Toddlers Push Limits | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Limit-pushing behavior can confound even the most attuned parent or caregiver. Why would our sweet darling throw her toy at us when we’ve just asked her not t
Deborah McNelis, M.Ed's insight:

It is essential for young children to have adults realize this critical understanding.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

Feed Brains for Happier Children - HappyFamily

Feed Brains for Happier Children - HappyFamily | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it

Want a happy, smart and healthy child? It really isn’t difficult to achieve. Feeding the hungers of the brain contributes greatly to well adjusted and thriving children. When provided with what the brain needs, children are likely to be more content and are eager to move, play and learn.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
more...
Lon Woodbury's curator insight, October 18, 2013 2:23 PM

In addition to food, this talks about the need for structure, consistency etc. as important to properly feeding the brain. -Lon

Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

as the school year begins: a better way to handle homework

as the school year begins: a better way to handle homework | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it

Do American students have too much homework, or too little? We often hear passionate arguments for either side, but I believe that we ought to be asking a different question altogether. What should matter to parents and educators is this: How effectively do children’s after-school assignments advance learning? The quantity of students’ homework is a lot less important than its quality. And evidence suggests that as of now, homework isn’t making the grade.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

Benefit of mobile apps for toddlers questioned | wlfi.com

Benefit of mobile apps for toddlers questioned | wlfi.com | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON (AP) — A U.S. consumer advocacy group says parents are getting duped into thinking mobile apps can make their babies and toddlers smarter.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

How parents see themselves may affect their child's brain and stress level

How parents see themselves may affect their child's brain and stress level | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
A mother's perceived social status predicts her child's brain development and stress indicators, finds a study at Boston Children's Hospital.
Deborah McNelis, M.Ed's insight:

In other research it has been shown that cronic stress affects the hippocampus and the resulting memory abilities.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

Why Kids' Bedtimes Matter So Much

Why Kids' Bedtimes Matter So Much | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Parents have all heard, and personally experienced, how critical a good night's sleep is for their children.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

Five Numbers to Remember About Early Childhood Development

This interactive feature highlights five numbers to remember about the development of young children.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

18 Blogs Explain Brain Breaks and Why they are Important

18 Blogs Explain Brain Breaks and Why they are Important | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
As an adult, you've likely experienced a time when you've been in a training session or a meeting and felt like you were at a breaking point and couldn't focus
more...
Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, July 6, 2013 10:03 PM

Wow.  Important information here (and lots of resources!).

 

"When kids get tired or bored, they tend to check out.  Once kids begin to check out they are no longer learning, and they mentally are removed from the situation despite being physically present.  It’s important to get their blood flowing and to reconnect those kids that have started day dreaming instead of listening to the lesson.  These six blog posts can explain more about the importance of brain breaks for kids and adults."

Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

Kids Can and Do Make A Difference! | Today I ate a Rainbow! TM

Kids Can and Do Make A Difference! | Today I ate a Rainbow! TM | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it

Can kids really be thoughtful, intelligent, brave and creative? Can kids really stand up and speak their mind? Can kids really make a difference?"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

Freedom + No Screens => Physically Fit Kids

Freedom + No Screens => Physically Fit Kids | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
In terms of physical activity and fitness, Marco's more like a lower-middle class Kenyan kid than an upper-middle class American kid. credit for right photo:
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deborah McNelis, M.Ed
Scoop.it!

The 3 Things We're All Terrified Of: Thing One

The 3 Things We're All Terrified Of: Thing One | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it

"I was friends with the son of a Hell’s Angel for several years … until he went to prison. As a way to show Tom love, his dad would beat him every day as a kid. This, in order to toughen him up, to increase his pain threshold so as to prepare him for a world that could be pretty cruel and uncaring. It worked. Tom was definitely tough, and physical pain was something he had little trouble enduring. The problem was that dad’s Hell’s Angel methods left Tom with little prefrontal, executive function brain development. Like the majority of violent offenders in prison, Tom couldn’t control his emotional impulses in the least, particularly anger"

Deborah McNelis, M.Ed's insight:

Early experiences make an incredible difference... and yet not everyone realizes this!

more...
No comment yet.