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Moving Smart: THE KINETIC SCALE: Beyond Gross & Fine Motor

Moving Smart: THE KINETIC SCALE: Beyond Gross & Fine Motor | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Deborah McNelis, M.Ed's insight:

Movement is at the very core of how children develop intellectually, emotionally, socially, and of course, physically. Here at Moving Smart we foster children's naturally move-to-learn style while helping parents and teachers understand the comprehensive benefits of all that wiggling!

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Early Brain Development
Creating awareness of the impact we can all easily have on optimal brain development for ALL children.
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EARLY CHILDHOOD BRAIN INSIGHTS: The Development of Empathy... An Essential Life Skill!

EARLY CHILDHOOD BRAIN INSIGHTS: The Development of Empathy... An Essential Life Skill! | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it

"For daycares and schools to have an effective way to help children for success in life, is to have low teacher child ratios to increase the opportunity to foster relationships with every child. And then use the understanding that the brain is experience dependent t. Children in schools can be engaged collectively in a caring climate and create activities that benefit other human beings."

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Barbara Kerr's curator insight, September 26, 2014 5:03 PM

"f we truly want to help children thrive in life ….and want to have an incredibly positive impact on our world, it is VITAL that we place the emphasis on the development of relationships with other human beings …"

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Game on: Playtime is vital for a child's development - Independent.ie

Game on: Playtime is vital for a child's development - Independent.ie | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Everyone knows that children love to play - it's what they do to pass the time and have fun. But playing is also extremely important for their physical, emotional and mental development and certain games will help to enhance the manner and speed in which they grow.
 
Dr David Carey is a Dublin-based child psychologist. He says children should be encouraged to engage in games from a very early age as the concepts they learn at this stage will be beneficial later in life.


"Play is the work of childhood and it's through play that children learn to learn," he says. "They learn about concepts that will be transformed into academic skills such as shape, texture, gravity and categorisation.


"Play helps to stimulate mathematical knowledge, language development, social and emotional intelligence and teaches how to control fine and gross motor skills."


Via Jocelyn Stoller
Deborah McNelis, M.Ed's insight:

ABSOLUTELY!!  It is critically essential that this becomes commonly understood!!  --

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Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, May 6, 7:00 AM

LOR GOD BLESS THE LITTLE CHILDREN ALL OVR THE FOUR CORNERS OF THE WOLD!!

Konstantinos Kalemis's curator insight, August 8, 2:59 PM

ABSOLUTELY!!  It is critically essential that this becomes commonly understood!!  --

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How Nature Helps Kids Live and Learn Better [infographic]

How Nature Helps Kids Live and Learn Better [infographic] | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Nature helps kids live better and learn better.

Via Steve Whitmore
Deborah McNelis, M.Ed's insight:

Brains absolutely NEED time in nature!!

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Steve Whitmore's curator insight, April 21, 2:15 PM

Is it time for a field trip? What about conducting a group outside? Look at the benefits mentioned in this infographic.

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How fathers' brains adapt to a newborn - Daily Mail

How fathers' brains adapt to a newborn - Daily Mail | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Hands-on fathers develop extra ‘grey matter’ in areas of the brain linked to emotional attachment, detecting babies’ needs, and improved multi-tasking, research has found.
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What Do The Children Deserve?

What Do The Children Deserve? | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
What Do The Children Deserve? Envision a world filled with happy children who are eager to learn, are healthy, feel confident in their abilities...
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Helping the Poor in Education: The Power of a Simple Nudge

Helping the Poor in Education: The Power of a Simple Nudge | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Researchers have found that something as small as text message reminders can help children born into poor families close the gap with richer students.
Deborah McNelis, M.Ed's insight:

There are enormous inequalities in education in the United States. A child born into a poor family has only a 9 percent chance of getting a college degree, but the odds are 54 percent for a child in a high-income family. These gaps open early, with poor children less prepared than their kindergarten classmates.

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Americans are obsessed with parenting advice. So why are our kids so miserable?

Americans are obsessed with parenting advice. So why are our kids so miserable? | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Research shows that children come into the world with a positive bias—they are prepared to be empathic and show kind behaviors toward others as soon as they are able to—but we are squandering that potential. UNICEF ranks American children 26th out of 29 rich countries on overall measures of well-being, and American kids rate themselves in the bottom quartile on measures of happiness.
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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, December 27, 2014 4:48 PM

Good question.  But is this advice appropriate?  Or a little too partisan?  -Lon

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Meet the Two Scientists Who Implanted a False Memory Into a Mouse

Meet the Two Scientists Who Implanted a False Memory Into a Mouse | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
The prospect of tinkering precisely with memory has tantalized scientists for years. “A lot of people had been thinking along these lines,” says Sheena Josselyn, a senior neuroscientist at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, who studies the cellular underpinnings of memory, “but they never dreamed that these experiments would actually work. No one ever thought that you could actually, really do this.”
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Quality of Words, Not Quantity, Is Crucial to Language Skills, Study Finds

Quality of Words, Not Quantity, Is Crucial to Language Skills, Study Finds | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
The quality of the communication between children and their parents and caregivers, the researchers say, is of much greater importance than the number of words a child hears.
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Terry Doherty's curator insight, October 26, 2014 4:28 PM

After reading this, I come away thinking about the power of genuine, authentic conversation with our kids. 

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Fighting parents emotionally damage children

Fighting parents emotionally damage children | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Parents who fight in front of their children risk damage to the child’s ability to recognise emotion, a new study suggests.

Researchers from New York University (NYU) found that such children would also struggle to control their own emotions. Lengthy periods of poverty during early childhood could also have a detrimental effect on their emotional development.
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Anxious children have bigger ‘fear centers’ in the brain

Anxious children have bigger ‘fear centers’ in the brain | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Deborah McNelis, M.Ed's insight:

"The amygdala is a key “fear center” in the brain. Alterations in the development of the amygdala during childhood may have an important influence on the development of anxiety problems, reports a new study in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry."

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Dawn Matheson's curator insight, June 30, 2014 5:18 PM

Did you know that anxiety-related traits and symptoms can be reliably assessed in children as young as 7 years old? Me neither.

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Gray Matters: Too Much Screen Time Damages the Brain

Gray Matters: Too Much Screen Time Damages the Brain | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Neuroimaging research shows excessive screen time damages the brain.
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Self-Confidence Starts Early | Urban Child Institute

Self-Confidence Starts Early | Urban Child Institute | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Self-esteem contributes to well-being by improving coping skills and providing a buffer against negative events and influences.
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mariarobets's curator insight, May 14, 2014 5:46 PM

The early years MATTER

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Bruce D. Perry: Social & Emotional Development in Early Childhood

Bruce D. Perry: Social & Emotional Development in Early Childhood | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Each of us takes the same journey from birth to consciousness—but none of us recalls it. This early stage of life is crucial; Sigmund Freud famously obsessed...
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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, May 15, 4:03 PM

This is an hour lecture, but well worth it.  It has a lot of background theory on early child development -Lon

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6 Rules to Break for Better, Deeper-Learning Outcomes

6 Rules to Break for Better, Deeper-Learning Outcomes | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Fortunately, research is catching up with our intuition and validating the practices that we know work in the classroom. One vision in particular, about what students should be able to do and know, is picking up steam. It's called deeper learning.
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Why Kids Need to Move, Touch and Experience to Learn - Mind/Shift

Why Kids Need to Move, Touch and Experience to Learn - Mind/Shift | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
When students use their bodies in the learning process, it can have a big effect, even if it seems silly or unconnected to the learning goal at hand. Researchers have found that when students use their bodies while doing mathematical storytelling (like with word problems, for example), it changes the way they think about math. “We understand language in a richer, fuller way if we can connect it to the actions we perform,” said Sian Beilock, professor of psychology at the University of Chicago.

Via John Evans
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 8, 9:45 PM

Students and teachers need to use all their senses and experience life fully.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Juanita Jackson's curator insight, May 15, 11:46 AM

keep our students actively participating...

Dr. Deborah Brennan's curator insight, May 19, 2:27 PM

There are several topics cover d in this article. The first is the use of movement to augment learning. This is not a new idea as many foreign language teachers have been using and recommending TPR - Total Physical Response as a p highly effective teaching strategy.  

 

The second point is about the distracting nature of highly decorated rooms. In my experience, the walls need to teach.  I do agree that decorations unrelated to content are irrelevant and distracting to learning.  We do not need photos of skateboarders or beaches that encourage daydreaming.  However, decorations that review content already taught or link concents within the content are highly effective learning strategies.  Visual cues can help spiral learning.  I had teachers who created a visual content organizer and added visuals as they progressed through the year.

 

the third point is about writing as a means to reduce test anxiety.  

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What Children Need Most is Adults That Understand Development

What Children Need Most is Adults That Understand Development | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
The brain doesn’t fully develop until about the age of 25. This fact is sometimes quite surprising and eye opening to new parents and early years professionals who are interacting with children every day. It can also be somewhat overwhelming to contemplate. It is essential to realize however, that the greatest time of development occurs in the year...
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Terry Doherty's curator insight, March 24, 3:17 PM

Couldn't agree more: "Children also must have appropriate and safe opportunities to experience things for themselves and feel the sense of accomplishment that goes along with completing tasks independently. "

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Children & Loss | Scholastic.com

Children & Loss | Scholastic.com | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it

Humans, by nature, are designed to grow, learn, work, and play in groups. By the time a child is 10, he or she has created and maintained dozens of key relationships — parents, siblings, friends, teachers, and more. Throughout life, these relationships satisfy our primary needs. It is the brain that allows these social connections. Unique neural systems change in response to the waxing and waning of relationships in our lives — forming a landscape created by the history of our emotional experiences. Relationships can bring us comfort, safety, and joy. Yet relationships can change or even end. And then we experience painful emotions.

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Keep Impulses in Check By Looking at Nature

Keep Impulses in Check By Looking at Nature | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Researchers at Utah State University asked three groups of participants to complete a task that tests whether they could resist instant gratification for a better reward later on. Before and during the task, the nature group viewed images of mountains, whereas the other groups looked at pictures of buildings or triangles. Participants who viewed natural scenes made less impulsive decisions than the other groups.
Deborah McNelis, M.Ed's insight:

Numerous studies demonstrate the benefits of nature on our brain and behavior as this article points out... "Gazing at images of the great outdoors has been linked with a range of benefits, including pain relief, stress recovery and mood improvement"

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Terry Doherty's curator insight, January 1, 9:31 AM

It seems so simple ... why can't all kids' desks face the windows?

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Instead of medicating in the early years for ADHD should we be looking at early childhood trauma and attachment?

Instead of medicating in the early years for ADHD should we be looking at early childhood trauma and attachment? | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
'Early years is where the magic happens' is something I am regularly heard saying when I speak at conferences and deliver training; this is because the evidence of the benefits of the right...
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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, December 27, 2014 4:54 PM

Convenience of the caretaker should not be a prime directive in working with very young children. -Lon

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Why Does Sitting Still Equal Learning?

Why Does Sitting Still Equal Learning? | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Whether we're talking about preschool, elementary through secondary school, college, or even adult learners, I have serious objections to the idea that learning supposedly only comes via the eyes, the ears, and the seat of the pants. Schools -- and policymakers -- have for too long accepted the belief that learning best occurs while students are seated (and quiet, of course). The theory may have been understandable back when they didn't have the research to prove otherwise. But today we do.
Deborah McNelis, M.Ed's insight:

It is critical that this information is  realized and clearly understood for the benefit of all!

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Terry Doherty's curator insight, November 7, 2014 5:27 PM

There is on one way to make a classroom work best for students. We know they're individuals, and the "moving around part" would seem to offer great opportunities for engaging them with learning, not just sitting their passively.

 

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Secret Teacher: jargon is ruining our children's education

Secret Teacher: jargon is ruining our children's education | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
the constant jargon that teachers are forced to use is rubbing off on our students. Not only is this meaningless for them but it's increasingly making their academic performance their responsibility too. Do primary school children really need that kind of pressure when they're so young?
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To prevent childhood trauma, pediatricians screen children and their parents…and sometimes, just parents...for childhood trauma

To prevent childhood trauma, pediatricians screen children and their parents…and sometimes, just parents...for childhood trauma | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
When parents bring their four-month-olds to a well-baby checkup at the Children’s Clinic in Portland, OR, Drs. Teri Petersen, R.J. Gillespie and their 15 other partners ask the parents about their ...
Deborah McNelis, M.Ed's insight:

"The ACE Study found that childhood trauma was very common — two-thirds of the 17,000 mostly white, middle-class, college-educated participants (all had jobs and great health care because they were members of Kaiser Permanene) experienced at least one type of severe childhood trauma. Most had suffered two or more."

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» 8 Surefire Ways To Emotionally Screw Up Your Kid - World of Psychology

» 8 Surefire Ways To Emotionally Screw Up Your Kid - World of Psychology | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it

"Do you worry about your child's emotional health? Worry no longer. Here are eight suggestions that will nearly guarantee your child will suffer from poor mental health, strained family relationships, poor peer relationships, low self-esteem and chronic emotional problems throughout his or her life."

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Dawn Matheson's curator insight, June 17, 2014 7:33 PM

Doesn't this picture say it all?

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Where do the children play?

Where do the children play? | Early Brain Development | Scoop.it
Actually, we're playing AND learning! In my senior year in college I took a course called "Observation of Young Children." For several hours a week I sat in
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