EAP and ICT go together easily
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EAP and ICT go together easily
Learning a second language through the use of technology
Curated by Bob T Bright
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Rescooped by Bob T Bright from Language teaching and learning in higher education
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Talk the talk: maximise your prospects using languages

Talk the talk: maximise your prospects using languages | EAP and ICT go together easily | Scoop.it
Personal endorsements from leading figures in the arts, sport, media, business, and politics demonstrate how learning languages can open doors to an array of careers and life experiences

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Rescooped by Bob T Bright from Learning Bytes from The Consultants-E
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Bookry

Bookry | EAP and ICT go together easily | Scoop.it

Great additions for your iBooks Author project.
Download straight onto the page, in both landscape and portrait formats.


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Fantastic New Resource for Language Teachers: Language cloud ...

Fantastic New Resource for Language Teachers: Language cloud ... | EAP and ICT go together easily | Scoop.it
Language cloud is the first learning management system (LMS) designed for language education. The free online platform allows ALTs and JTEs to easily manage their classes, student progress and course materials, anytime ...
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Rescooped by Bob T Bright from Nik Peachey
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Lesson Plan: Born, bread and buttered in London

In this lesson students hear a man being interviewed about his life in London. He talks about the different parts of London he has lived in and how things have changed in these areas. The tasks focus students on learning more about London from Google Maps and images and the listening tasks focus them on reading between the lines of what the man says and understanding inferred meaning. Lastly, the lesson finishes with an optional grammar focus with a speaking activity based around ‘used to’ and ‘didn’t use to’.


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