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Reading in the future: interactive fiction and chatbots | cette femme-la.net

Reading in the future: interactive fiction and chatbots | cette femme-la.net | EAL in Computer Science | Scoop.it

I’ve recently been reading the work of interactive fiction writer Emily Short and discovered her story Galatea. I was happy to find that the story was powered by a chatbot engine and I wondered if this was a whole genre within interactive fiction. To my initial surprise, I discovered that there seem to be very few stories that rely on the use of chatbot technology. But once I thought about it, I decided that given the volatility of a lot of chatbot responses, it isn’t surprising that they haven’t been more widely used in interactive storytelling.

 

Before Siri, chatbots weren’t widely known. And Apple don’t call Siri a chatbot, so the term might still be unfamiliar. But Siri does what chatbots do. She understands questions and remarks put to her on a pre-defined range of topics and can respond with appropriate information. When she’s asked something outside what she’s been programmed to know about, she can give an intelligent response though it’s also generally going to be one that doesn’t answer the question.

 

Siri is a tightly controlled chatbot. Apple don’t want her to give unpredictable responses. But there are other chatbots that can speak to a much wider range of subjects. They do this by learning from what people say to them. While this improves their subject knowledge, it can also make them quite random in what they say and how they respond. An example of this type of bot is Cleverbot.

 

While I’ve been in Sydney, I’ve done a lot of work for a company that makes chatbots. And the types I’ve worked on are mostly the tightly controlled ones. It is possible to make these bots have a very large knowledge area but it requires copious amounts of time and effort. And then plenty of ongoing maintenance.

 

The company I’ve been working for has a proprietary platform and I’m not familiar with all the options available for people looking to create their own chatbots. I can understand that the looser types of bots would destroy anything that a creator might be trying to do within an interactive fiction.

 

So I’m unsure what the programming is behind Emily Short’s Galatea. But it’s sophisticated and given that she wrote this interactive fiction back in 2000, I think she was far ahead of her time.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Dawn Hewitson's insight:

How could this impact on EAL in Schools, Could a chatbot be used as an interactive tool for pupils

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Dear reader,

Dear reader, | EAL in Computer Science | Scoop.it

The Raspberry Pi project website is http://www.raspberrypi.org/

This is one of my news digests. If you like my editorial choices, there are more to be found by clicking on the "dear reader" link, and on my name above.
Enjoy !


Via F. Thunus
Dawn Hewitson's insight:

Looking forward to having a go at some of the projects on here

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Zeezee's comment, May 29, 2013 3:12 AM
Success always with your project
Ted Browne's curator insight, February 5, 8:58 PM

Possible new curriculum...

Donald Thomas's curator insight, August 30, 8:07 AM

this is 

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Communicating Your Website Content with Language Support ...

Communicating Your Website Content with Language Support ... | EAL in Computer Science | Scoop.it
Joe Boyd, Programmer at Bayshore Solutions, shares how language support can be key in communicating your website's content to your international audience.
Dawn Hewitson's insight:

Think of your classroom as an International audience. You can then use inclusive tools to support learning.

 

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Focus on Teachers: Mark Weese, Authentic Literacy Work in Science

Focus on Teachers: Mark Weese, Authentic Literacy Work in Science | EAL in Computer Science | Scoop.it
Teacher leader Mark Weese successfully teaches literacy standards in his science classes.
Dawn Hewitson's insight:

Science and literacy support

 

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Adult Literacy // Gauging Success Rates | Invisible Children Blog

Adult Literacy // Gauging Success Rates | Invisible Children Blog | EAL in Computer Science | Scoop.it
"I am ready to pass the exam I will receive today," Pyerina Okot confidently stated. Her classmates were gathered nearby, pens in hand, anxiously awaiting the papers that their facilitator was preparing to hand out.
Dawn Hewitson's insight:

Interesting insight

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Reading in the future: interactive fiction and chatbots | cette femme-la.net

Reading in the future: interactive fiction and chatbots | cette femme-la.net | EAL in Computer Science | Scoop.it

I’ve recently been reading the work of interactive fiction writer Emily Short and discovered her story Galatea. I was happy to find that the story was powered by a chatbot engine and I wondered if this was a whole genre within interactive fiction. To my initial surprise, I discovered that there seem to be very few stories that rely on the use of chatbot technology. But once I thought about it, I decided that given the volatility of a lot of chatbot responses, it isn’t surprising that they haven’t been more widely used in interactive storytelling.

 

Before Siri, chatbots weren’t widely known. And Apple don’t call Siri a chatbot, so the term might still be unfamiliar. But Siri does what chatbots do. She understands questions and remarks put to her on a pre-defined range of topics and can respond with appropriate information. When she’s asked something outside what she’s been programmed to know about, she can give an intelligent response though it’s also generally going to be one that doesn’t answer the question.

 

Siri is a tightly controlled chatbot. Apple don’t want her to give unpredictable responses. But there are other chatbots that can speak to a much wider range of subjects. They do this by learning from what people say to them. While this improves their subject knowledge, it can also make them quite random in what they say and how they respond. An example of this type of bot is Cleverbot.

 

While I’ve been in Sydney, I’ve done a lot of work for a company that makes chatbots. And the types I’ve worked on are mostly the tightly controlled ones. It is possible to make these bots have a very large knowledge area but it requires copious amounts of time and effort. And then plenty of ongoing maintenance.

 

The company I’ve been working for has a proprietary platform and I’m not familiar with all the options available for people looking to create their own chatbots. I can understand that the looser types of bots would destroy anything that a creator might be trying to do within an interactive fiction.

 

So I’m unsure what the programming is behind Emily Short’s Galatea. But it’s sophisticated and given that she wrote this interactive fiction back in 2000, I think she was far ahead of her time.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Dawn Hewitson's insight:

How could this impact on EAL in Schools, Could a chatbot be used as an interactive tool for pupils

more...
No comment yet.
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Add Multiple Language Support to Your Unity Projects

After writing a couple of Android applications I thought it would be nice if one could implement support for multiple languages in their Unity projects as easily as in an Android project. I had this idea a few months ago and finally got around to ...
Dawn Hewitson's insight:

An example of inclusivity when using Android platforms

 

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Top 10 nations in adult literacy: Japan and Finland lead, U.S. lags ...

Top 10 nations in adult literacy: Japan and Finland lead, U.S. lags ... | EAL in Computer Science | Scoop.it
Never mind STEM skills -- companies and nations need workers who are highly literate in basic skill areas, including literacy, reading components, math, and problem solving.
Dawn Hewitson's insight:

Information about world performance

 

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