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antropologiaNet, dataviz, collective intelligence, algorithms, social learning, social change, digital humanities
Curated by luiy
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[Omnsh.org : l’Observatoire des Mondes Numériques en Sciences Humaines :.]

[Omnsh.org : l’Observatoire des Mondes Numériques en Sciences Humaines :.] | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

Quoi de neuf, Docteur ? ou, L’innovation comme volonté et représentation 

David Morin Ulmann 

Mots clefs : Innovation, Culture, Design thinking, Surdétermination, Omnisignification, Imaginaire, Internationale situationniste, Spectacle, Heidegger, Weltbild, Modernité, Spleen, Speed, Matérialisme romantique, Négativité cool, Capitalisme sympa. 

 

...les miracles de l’industrie rendent de plus en plus superflus les miracles des dieux...

Karl Marx, Manuscrits de 1844.

 

...la civilisation scientifique (...) c’est la possibilité d’un savoir qui n’est plus encombré de la question de la vérité : un savoir sans vérité.


Jean-Pierre Lebrun, Un monde sans limite, 2009.

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Ray Kurzweil Plans to Create a Mind at Google—and Have it Serve You | MIT Technology Review

Ray Kurzweil Plans to Create a Mind at Google—and Have it Serve You | MIT Technology Review | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
The technologist speaks about an ambitious plan to build a powerful artificial intelligence.

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Think Complexity

Think Complexity | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Expand your Python skills by working with data structures and algorithms in a refreshing context—through an eye-opening exploration of complexity science. You’ll work with graphs, algorithm analysis, scale-free networks, and cellular automata, using advanced features that make Python such a powerful language. Ideal as a text for courses on Python programming and algorithms, Think Complexity will also help self-learners gain valuable experience with topics and ideas they might not encounter otherwise.


Via Frédéric Amblard
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A visual exploration on mapping complex networks

A visual exploration on mapping complex networks | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
VisualComplexity.com is a unified resource space for anyone interested in the visualization of complex networks.

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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MULTI-AGENT SYSTEMS

//PROBOTICS PHASE 01 //AADRL 2008/2009 //Team: Jose Sanchez, Knut Brunier, Anica Taneja, Diego Rossel //Course Tutor: Alisa Andrasek...

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Workshop on Evolutionary Computation and Multi-Agent System and Simulation Workshop (ECoMASS-2013)

SEVENTH ANNUAL WORKSHOP ON
Evolutionary Computation and Multi-Agent Systems
and Simulation Workshop (ECoMASS-2013)

to be held as part of the

2013 Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference (GECCO-2013)
July 06-10, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Organized by ACM SIGEVO
http://www.sigevo.org/gecco-2013

PAPER SUBMISSION DEADLINE FOR WORKSHOP: March 28, 2013

Workshop URL: http://www.cscs.umich.edu/ecomass/


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Rescooped by luiy from Big Data Technology, Semantics and Analytics
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Predictive Analysis: 7 Reasons You Need It Today

Predictive Analysis: 7 Reasons You Need It Today | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
With today’s enterprise software you no longer have to take a shot in the dark at decision making. Regardless of your organization’s size, industry, or the

Via Tony Agresta
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Tony Agresta's curator insight, December 18, 2012 1:47 PM

I would expect predictive analytics technology to surge in growth, especially with the deluge of data arriving every day.   We are well beyond the early days when direct marketing pioneers applied predictive models to forecast response or performance (although that still happens more often than you think!).   Today, models can take advantage of more independent attributes than ever before – including structured and unstructured data    In turn, the predictive precision of the models increases.  There are more than a few ways to apply the results.   The obvious one is applying the scoring algorithms to new sets of data.   But don't lose sight of the fact that model scores can also be used as filters in queries to segment and report on your big data.   They can also be used as attributes in link analysis graphs designed to pinpoint fraud, cyber breaches, and networks of frequent buyers.  Imagine a network graph where links between people are scaled based on their predicted spend or the number of products they will buy during the holiday season.  It would easy to identify clusters of loyal customers which you could then study in more detail.  When coupled with other characteristics and contact info, targeting becomes precise and the meaning behind your big data becomes obvious.

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Bums, bridges, and primates: some elements for a Sociology of Online Interactions » OWNI.eu, News, Augmented

Bums, bridges, and primates: some elements for a Sociology of Online Interactions » OWNI.eu, News, Augmented | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Science understanding of Web-based sociabilities has progressed enormously in the last decade: this should inform public policies touching on the Web, its regulation and governance.

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"This is where we start seeing the outline of the society that is taking shape since the advent of online communication: neither a fuzzy nebula of isolated monads, nor meganetwork of weakly tied individuals – but a linkage of dense strongly-tied subcomponents (boxes) interweaved by long weakly-tied bridges. As online communication enables bridging on a higher level, it creates a “glocal” network, that can be described as an assemblage of small, loosely independent components – our little boxes."


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Using Gephi to visualize keywords and landing pages from Google Analytics

Geek of all trades, master of none...

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Welcome to the VOSON Project! | Virtual Observatory for the Study of Online Networks (VOSON)

Welcome to the VOSON Project! | Virtual Observatory for the Study of Online Networks (VOSON) | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via J-Christophe Plantin
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Rescooped by luiy from Papers
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Modeling complex systems with adaptive networks

Modeling complex systems with adaptive networks | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Adaptive networks are a novel class of dynamical networks whose topologies and states coevolve. Many real-world complex systems can be modeled as adaptive networks, including social networks, transportation networks, neural networks and biological networks. In this paper, we introduce fundamental concepts and unique properties of adaptive networks through a brief, non-comprehensive review of recent literature on mathematical/computational modeling and analysis of such networks. We also report our recent work on several applications of computational adaptive network modeling and analysis to real-world problems, including temporal development of search and rescue operational networks, automated rule discovery from empirical network evolution data, and cultural integration in corporate merger.

 

Modeling complex systems with adaptive networks
Hiroki Sayama, , , Irene Pestov, Jeffrey Schmidt, Benjamin James Bush, Chun Wong, Junichi Yamanoi, Thilo Gross

Computers & Mathematics with Applications

In Press, Corrected Proof

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.camwa.2012.12.005


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Collaboration is the New Competition

Five ways to drive large-scale social change by working cooperatively.

Via ddrrnt, Complexity Digest
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ddrrnt's curator insight, January 12, 2013 7:19 AM

Leaders and organizations are acknowledging that even their best individual efforts can't stack up against today's complex and interconnected problems. They are putting aside self-interests and collaborating to build a new civic infrastructure to advance their shared objectives. It's called collective impact and it's a growing trend across the country. (...)

While collaboration is certainly not a foreign concept, what we're seeing around the country is the coming together of non-traditional partners, and a willingness to embrace new ways of working together. And, this movement is yielding promising results.

... five lessons for driving large-scale social change through collaboration:


  1. Clearly define what you can do together: As Dana O'Donovan of the Monitor Institute has noted, many organizations find collaboration to be messy and time consuming. From the very beginning, you must develop clarity of purpose and articulate, "What can we do together that we could not do alone?" (...)
  2. Transcend parochialism: Even the most well intended collaboration is often crippled by parochialism. Individual organizations earmark their participation and resources for activities that perfectly align with their own work or they use the collaboration platform as a way to get other participants to fund their own priorities. (...)
  3. Adapt to data: The complex, multidisciplinary problems that many collaborative projects tackle do not have easy fixes. These challenges require continuous learning and innovation and the use of real-time data to help participants understand what is and isn't working. Adjustments must be made on the fly. (...)
  4. Feed the field: You have an obligation to share what you learn — both the results and the methods for achieving them. Living Cities has long understood the value that our member institutions get by learning and working together. (...)
  5. Support the backbone: In our experience, progress is best achieved when a "backbone organization," keeps the group's work moving forward. Staff at these organizations ensure that work is completed between meetings, track data, enable adaptation, disseminate knowledge, and build buy-in and ownership from all participants.(...)

Ben Hecht

Ben Hecht is President & CEO of Living Cities, an organization that harnesses the collective knowledge of its 22 member foundations and financial institutions to benefit low income people and the cities where they live.



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Antifragile

Radical philosopher Nassim Nicholas Taleb offers a blueprint for how to live - and thrive - in a world we don't understand, and which is too uncertain for us to even try to predict.

Discussant: Rohan Silva, senior policy adviser to the Prime Minister at No 10 Downing Street.

Chair: Fraser Nelson, editor, The Spectator

 


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Workshop on Evolutionary Computation and Multi-Agent System and Simulation Workshop (ECoMASS-2013)

Workshop on Evolutionary Computation and Multi-Agent System and Simulation Workshop (ECoMASS-2013) | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
SEVENTH ANNUAL WORKSHOP ON Evolutionary Computation and Multi-Agent Systems and Simulation Workshop (ECoMASS-2013) to be held as part of the 2013 Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference (GECCO-2013) July 06-10, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Organized...

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Rescooped by luiy from The Aesthetic Ground
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Unspeakableness

Unspeakableness | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

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luiy's insight:

Emotion Archive


This is the extension of the untranslatable words visualisation. In order to take the visualisation further, I started to work closely with a native Russian speaker and three native German to translate the whole list of emotions, to see if they can be translated properly, or are there unique words in Chinese, Russian, or German that depicts the emotions into more precision, to come up with this "grand detail" of human emotions. It then develops into an interactive emotion archive where you can compare different emotionscape in different langauges, as well as understanding the emotions directly from facial expression, tonality, and body movements.

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Xaos's curator insight, January 20, 2013 4:34 PM

This is the early stage research of the project. In late January, 2012, I emailed around Royal College of Art asking for words describing emotions in languages other than English that are untranslatable into English. Interesting enough, in order to understand the untranslatable words I had to have several correspondence with the person who contributed the word, and through this back-and-forth discussion can I actually get the glimpse of the emotion itself. These explanation of the untranslatable words are often in the format of "it is a kind of (emotion A), close to (emotion B), and somehow between (emotion C) and (emotion D)." This triggers me to map out the emotions based on the classification of emotions provided in Shaver et al. - "Emotion Knowledge - Futher Exploration of a Prototype Approach." in the book Emotions in Social Psychology by W. Parrott (2001). Which I intented to visualised the untranslatable words as chemical molecules that reacts with the emotion "nodes" to the fact that untranslatable words are often complicated emotions that are the mixture of other translatable emotions.

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Whether tweets live or die depends more on network, competition for attention than message or user influence

Whether tweets live or die depends more on network, competition for attention than message or user influence | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

On the global social media stage, it's not so much the message but rather network structure and competition for attention that determine whether a meme becomes popular and shows staying power or whether it falls by the wayside, research led by Indiana University has determined.


Via Frédéric Amblard
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Rescooped by luiy from comple-X-city
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Code/Space: a Book

Code/Space: a Book | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Code/Space research is examining the new spatialities and new modes of (spatial) governance and empowerment enabled by the development and adoption of software through an exploration of the dyadic relationship between software and space; how the production of space is increasingly reliant on code, and code is written to produce space. In so doing, we are developing a set of conceptual tools for identifying and understanding these relationships, illustrating our arguments through rich, contemporary empirical material relating to different spatial spheres and everyday activities (travel, home, work, consumption). The principal concepts we detail are transduction and automated management. Through the concept of transduction we theorise space and spatialities as ontogenetic in nature, as constantly in a state of becoming. Software, through its technicity – its ability to do work in the world - transduces space; enables space to unfold in multifarious ways. We formulate the concept of automated management to think through the various ways that new software systems survey, capture and process information about people and things in automatic ways and make judgements algorithmically without human scrutiny.


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On Cooperation in Multi-Agent Systems

On Cooperation in Multi-Agent Systems | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Cooperation is often presented as one of the key concepts which differentiates multi-agent systems from other related disciplines such as distributed computing, object-oriented systems, and expert systems. However it is a concept whose precise usage in agent-based systems is at best unclear and at worst highly inconsistent.

 

Given the centrality of the issue, and the different ideological viewpoints on the subject, this was a lively panel which dealt with the following main
issues: ..........

 

More:

http://bit.ly/wmxzJV

http://bit.ly/yjlxM4

 

Bonus:

http://bit.ly/zzFWNn


Via Mhd.Shadi Khudr
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Rescooped by luiy from Anthropology, communication & technology
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Call for anthropology bloggers - American Anthropological Association

Call for anthropology bloggers - American Anthropological Association | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Do you like to write? AAA is looking for a limited number of guest bloggers for this AAA blog and for the AAA Huffington Post blog. Blogging is open to all AAA members. For details, click here.

Via Andrea Naranjo
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Rescooped by luiy from Educación a Distancia y TIC
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RUSC. Revista #Universidad y Sociedad del Conocimiento. Vol. 10, N.º 1 Enero 2013

Nuevo número de RUSC , la Revista de Universidad y Sociedad del Conocimiento de la UOC Revista científica arbitrada sobre e-learning, universidad y sociedad del conocimiento.. con Albert Sangrá y Steve Wheeler coordinando ..


Via L. García Aretio
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Adilia Josefina's curator insight, January 23, 2013 1:46 PM

add your insight...

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The quantified self movement: some sociological perspectives

The quantified self movement: some sociological perspectives | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
The concepts of ‘self-tracking’ and the ‘quantified self’ have recently begun to emerge in discussions of how best to optimise one’s life. These concepts refer to the practice of gathering data abo...

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"Yet from a sociological perspective a number of interesting questions about the quest to achieve ‘self-knowledge through numbers’ arise, including the following: What types of people are attracted to self-tracking? How do they use the data they produce? How are concepts of the body, self, social relationships, health and happiness both configured and negotiated via these data? How do members of their social networks respond to the sharing of data produced through this self-surveillance? How do self-trackers’ doctors or therapists make use of the data they produce? What the implications of shared data derived from self-tracking for patient empowerment? How does the digital device construct reality for its user, how it is incorporated into the routines of everyday life, how does it shape social encounters, how does it present users to others and to themselves? There is much more here to investigate in relation to the attempt to achieve ‘self-knowledge through numbers’."


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Using Google Spreadsheets to extract Twitter data » brelson.com


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Facebook's Bold, Compelling and Scary Engine of Discovery: The Inside Story of Graph Search

Beast had a birthday last week. The First Dog of social networking — live-in companion to Mark Zuckerberg and his bride, Priscilla Chan — turned two. The proud owners baked a cake for the Hungarian sheepdog and decided to throw an impromptu party. Naturally, when it came time to compile the guest list, the couple turned to Facebook, the $67 billion company that Zuckerberg founded in his dorm room nine years ago.

 

To date, sorting through your Facebook friends could be a frustrating task. Although the site has a search bar, there has been no easy way to quickly cull contacts based on specific criteria. But Zuckerberg was testing a major new feature that Facebook would announce on Jan. 15 — one that promises to transform its user experience, threaten its competitors, and torment privacy activists. It’s called Graph Search, and it will eventually allow a billion people to dive into the vast trove of stored information about them and their network of friends. In Zuckerberg’s case, it allowed him to type “Friends of Priscilla and me who live around Palo Alto” and promptly receive a list of potential celebrants. “We invited five people over who were obvious dog lovers,” he says.


Via Ashish Umre
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Tipping points: From patterns to predictions

There has been much talk about tipping points over the past few years, and about the warning signals that may precede them. You could be forgiven for thinking that the forecasting of epidemics and stock-market crashes is just around the corner. But no one has yet managed to use the theory on early warning signals to predict a natural catastrophe.

The rewards of bridging the gap between the real world and mathematical conceptualizations of catastrophic shifts would be vast. Climate scientists might be able to foresee major shifts in the ocean currents with a rise in global temperatures; ecologists could potentially stave off pest outbreaks; and policies might be implemented to avert the collapse of fisheries1. (A report out this week from the World Economic Forum outlines other risks facing the world2). But for such applications to emerge, researchers should resist the lure of general rules. We must instead use all the available data to develop tools to study the specific properties of real systems.

 

Tipping points: From patterns to predictions

Carl Boettiger & Alan Hastings

Nature 493, 157–158 (10 January 2013) http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/493157a


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Complex dynamics in learning complicated games

Writing in PNAS, a University of Manchester physicist has discovered that some games are simply impossible to fully learn, or too complex for the human mind to understand.


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