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antropologo.net, dataviz, collective intelligence, algorithms, social learning, social change, digital humanities
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Rescooped by luiy from Neuroanthropology
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Ethnography of Trolling: Workarounds, Discipline-Jumping and Ethical Pitfalls (1 of 3)

Ethnography of Trolling: Workarounds, Discipline-Jumping and Ethical Pitfalls (1 of 3) | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Editor’s Note: Reddit. Facebook. YouTube. Twitter. These days it’s difficult to go anywhere online without encountering an anonymous troll (or ten). Debates about trolling, which is best desc...

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Greg Downey's curator insight, January 8, 2013 2:56 PM

My name is Whitney Phillips, and I study trolls. Well, not just trolls. I’ve also written about meme culture, so-bad-it’s-good fan engagement (my essay on the kuso aesthetic in Troll 2 is forthcoming in Transformative Works and Cultures), and online shaming. But for the better part of five-ish years, my life has revolved around trolls and the trolls who troll them.

Rescooped by luiy from Neuroanthropology
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Folkstreams free archive of folk/roots culture documentaries

Folkstreams free archive of folk/roots culture documentaries | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Folkstreams is an incredible online archive of documentary films about American folk and roots music and culture including "Born From Hard Luck," excerpted above.

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Rescooped by luiy from Social network data analysis
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Bio4jExplorer: familiarize yourself with Bio4j nodes and relationships | bio4j blog

Bio4jExplorer: familiarize yourself with Bio4j nodes and relationships | bio4j blog | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
RT @bio4j: Bio4jExplorer: familiarize yourself with #Bio4j nodes and relationships http://t.co/1IKl0WOP #bioinformatics #neo4j #bigdata #nosql #viz...

Via Armando Reis, eRelations
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Rescooped by luiy from CentOS, RHEL, Mac OSX, Hackintosh
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Hadoop 3 nodes installation on CentOS 6.3 with Hortonworks HDP | dbinterest.com

Hadoop 3 nodes installation on CentOS 6.3 with Hortonworks HDP | dbinterest.com | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

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Rescooped by luiy from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
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Communications & Society: The Nodes and Edges of Connectivism | Keith Hamon

"I've just finished reading Scott Weingart's Demystifying Networks, Parts I & II, in which Mr. Weingart tries to correct the misuse of networks by humanities scholars. ... Both the Universe and our knowledge of it are network phenomena. Actually, I already object to that statement as it seems to suggest that our knowledge is something apart from the Universe. It isn't. Our knowledge is somehow an active node in the universal network, connected along multiple edges .... "


Via Peter B. Sloep
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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 7, 2013 4:30 PM

This post is a brave attempt to make sense of connectivism, in particular of Downes statement that "At its heart, connectivism is the thesis that knowledge is distributed across a network of connections, and therefore that learning consists of the ability to construct and traverse those networks". The problem I have with Downes definition is its metaphorical character, but at least it is imaginable what one does when learning in a connectivist way. The statement that our knowledge is somehow an active node in the universal network eludes me completely. Understanding arrives by analysis, not by making it part of something larger, particularly if the larger is even less clear. This post, it seems, perpetrates exactly the sin Weingart seeks to correct: misuse of networks by humanities scholars. In short, a useful post, which should help to clarify what networked learning is (of which connectivist learning is a subspecies) by making clear what it is NOT. (@pbsloep)

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Doing Crazy-Cool Node.js Things with Nodestack | Architects Zone

Doing Crazy-Cool Node.js Things with Nodestack | Architects Zone | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
 
There are myriad open source
options for building great apps, but one stack is emerging in the
Enterprise because it offers superior...

Via NodeJS-News.com
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Rescooped by luiy from Papers
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Synthetic Population Dynamics

Synthetic Population Dynamics | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Computer-simulated synthetic populations are used by researchers and policy makers to help understand and predict the aggregate behaviour of large numbers of individuals. Research aims include explaining the structural and dynamic characteristics of populations, and the implications of these characteristics for dynamic processes such as the spread of disease, opinions and social norms. Policy makers planning for the future economic, healthcare or infrastructure needs of a population want to be able to evaluate the possible effects of their policies. In both cases, it is desirable that the structure and dynamic behaviour of synthetic populations be statistically congruent to that of real populations. Here, we present a parsimonious individual-based model for generating synthetic population dynamics that focuses on the effects that demographic change have on the structure and composition of households.

 

Synthetic Population Dynamics: A Model of Household Demography
by Nicholas Geard, James M. McCaw, Alan Dorin, Kevin B. Korb and Jodie McVernon
http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/16/1/8.html


Via Complexity Digest
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Rescooped by luiy from Transmedia Think & Do Tank (since 2010)
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REGARDS SUR LE NUMERIQUE | Les collectivités dans l'aventure de l'Open data

REGARDS SUR LE NUMERIQUE | Les collectivités dans l'aventure de l'Open data | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Le laboratoire d'étude et de veille Serdalab vient de publier son étude sur les collectivités et l'ouverture des données publiques.

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Rescooped by luiy from Cooperation Theory & Practice
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Do trees communicate? Networks, networks…

Do trees communicate? Networks, networks… | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
UBC Professor Suzanne Simard on Mother Trees. I was unfamiliar with how mycorrhizal networks connect the roots of trees, facilitating the sharing of resources. Dr. Suzanne Simard writes: Graduate s...

Via Howard Rheingold
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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, February 8, 2013 2:12 PM

I introduce mycorrhizal networks in my literacy of cooperation course, as part of the  module surveying cooperative arrangements in biology at all levels from the subcellular to the ecosystemic.

Rescooped by luiy from Anthropology, communication & technology
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Digital Ethnography: Computational & multimodal approaches to field...

Slides from a skype talk that I gave to a graduate seminar on digital scholarship at University of Oregon.

Via Andrea Naranjo
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Rescooped by luiy from A New Society, a new education!
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Arte, Mente y Cerebro - Gardner

Scribd is the world's largest social reading and publishing site.

Via cristina guadalupe, Ramon Aragon, juandoming
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Rescooped by luiy from Complex Networks Everywhere
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Networks thrive in complexity

Networks thrive in complexity | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle. One good example of complexity that we can try to fathom is nature itself. Networks thrive in nature. As Howard Bloom stated in a speech at Yale University


Via Ashish Umre, Tim Williamson, Ides De Vos, Alejandro J. Alvarez S.
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Tim Williamson's curator insight, December 30, 2012 1:39 PM

Excellent work.  I would add that to properly understand complex systems on the global scale requires a holistic approach.  You can somewhat understand the mechanics of the system only generally since these systems are emergent by definition, but to 'influence' the outcomes of an emergent system requires a holistic understanding.

Rescooped by luiy from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
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5 Unexpected Factors That Change How We Forecast The Future

5 Unexpected Factors That Change How We Forecast The Future | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Editor’s NoteThis post is part of Co.Exist’s Futurist Forum, a series of articles by some of the world’s leading futurists about what the world will look like in the near and distant future, and how you can improve how you navigate future scenarios...

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5: Art

This may be a surprise, but art--from movies to music to comic books--is a rapidly changing measure of how people react to the world around them. How would your forecast be represented in artworks? How would your forecast change people’s relationships with the art they consume?

These aren’t the only possible forecast dynamics, but they give you a sense of what futurists look for when thinking about the future: context, breadth, and a chance to make explicit our assumptions about how the world is changing. We all have implicit models of what the future (or futures) could look like, and any set of scenarios we create builds on these models. By making the assumptions explicit, we have the opportunity to challenge them, expand them, and ultimately to give greater nuance and meaning to the forecasts and scenarios we create for broader consumption. That’s the basic rule of practical futurism: Create your forecasts like the future matters.


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Rescooped by luiy from Neuroanthropology
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The Crisis in Higher Education | MIT Technology Review

The Crisis in Higher Education | MIT Technology Review | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Online versions of college courses are attracting hundreds of thousands of students, millions of dollars in funding, and accolades from university administrators. Is this a fad, or is higher education about to get the overhaul it needs?

Via Greg Downey
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Greg Downey's curator insight, December 29, 2012 10:17 PM

It's not the first time that educators have feared that technology will make them obsolete. The article is from September, but well worth the read.

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NMC Horizon Report > 2013 Higher Education Edition | The New Media Consortium

NMC Horizon Report > 2013 Higher Education Edition | The New Media Consortium | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

The NMC Horizon Report > 2013 Higher Education Edition is a collaborative effort between the NMC and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI), an EDUCAUSE Program.

 

The tenth edition describes annual findings from the NMC Horizon Project, a decade-long research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in higher education. Six emerging technologies are identified across three adoption horizons over the next one to five years, as well as key trends and challenges expected to continue over the same period, giving campus leaders and practitioners a valuable guide for strategic technology planning.

The 2013 Horizon Project Higher Education Advisory Board initially voted on the top 12 emerging technologies — the result of which is documented in this a interim report: the NMC Horizon Project Short List > 2013 Higher Education Edition. This Short List then helped the advisory board narrow down the 12 technologies to six for the full publication

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Rescooped by luiy from Motion Graphics
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Nodes 1.2 plugin for Final Cut Pro, Motion and After Effects

Nodes 1.2 plugin for Final Cut Pro, Motion and After Effects | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

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Rescooped by luiy from Story and Narrative
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Modern Dance: Connecting People & Media Through Cultural Nodes #anthropology #remediation #transmedia #art #storytelling

Modern Dance: Connecting People & Media Through Cultural Nodes #anthropology #remediation #transmedia #art #storytelling | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

A couple of posts back I talked a little bit about how storytelling practices are evolving through things like remediation, which is essentially the idea that visual media achieve their cultural significance precisely by paying homage to, rivaling, and refashioning expressions of other media, such as performance art.


Via Gregg Morris
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Rescooped by luiy from Revolutionary - Agents
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William Gibson Talks Zero History, Paranoia and the Awesome Power of Twitter

William Gibson Talks Zero History, Paranoia and the Awesome Power of Twitter | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

And to my surprise, I found that Twitter started to bring in new friends and connections. I suspect the difference is that it is less formatted, or not formatted at all. It hasn’t been constructed to provide me an experience in any particular way, which is a function of its minimalist architecture.


Via proto-e-co-logics
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Rescooped by luiy from The Long Poiesis
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Everything That Will Go Extinct In The Next 40 Years [Infographic]

Everything That Will Go Extinct In The Next 40 Years [Infographic] | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Goodbye newspapers, retirement, wrinkles, euro...

Via Xaos
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Xaos's curator insight, February 7, 2013 1:36 AM

Futurist website nowandnext.com put together this awesome infographic predicting all of the technologies, behaviors, and ideas that will probably be distant memories by 2050. Among their predictions: no more retirement four years from now, no more secretaries six years from now, and no more free parking or sit-down breakfasts by 2019.

 

Laura Brown's comment, February 9, 2013 6:46 PM
I'm not going to worry about it because I will be extinct myself in roughly 40 years.
Rescooped by luiy from Social Foraging
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How women organize social networks different from men

How women organize social networks different from men | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Superpositions of social networks, such as communication, friendship, or trade networks, are called multiplex networks, forming the structural backbone of human societies. Novel datasets now allow quantification and exploration of multiplex networks. Here we study gender-specific differences of a multiplex network from a complete behavioral dataset of an online-game society of about 300,000 players. On the individual level females perform better economically and are less risk-taking than males. Males reciprocate friendship requests from females faster than vice versa and hesitate to reciprocate hostile actions of females. On the network level females have more communication partners, who are less connected than partners of males. We find a strong homophily effect for females and higher clustering coefficients of females in trade and attack networks. Cooperative links between males are under-represented, reflecting competition for resources among males. These results confirm quantitatively that females and males manage their social networks in substantially different ways.


Via Ashish Umre
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Rescooped by luiy from CxAnnouncements
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Global Multi-Level Analysis of the ‘Scientific Food Web'

Global Multi-Level Analysis of the ‘Scientific Food Web' | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
We introduce a network-based index analyzing excess scientific production and consumption to perform a comprehensive global analysis of scholarly knowledge production and diffusion on the level of continents, countries, and cities.

Via FuturICT, Complexity Digest
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Stop Hyping Big Data and Start Paying Attention to 'Long Data' | Wired Opinion | Wired.com

Stop Hyping Big Data and Start Paying Attention to 'Long Data' | Wired Opinion | Wired.com | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Our species can’t seem to escape big data. We have more data inputs, storage, and computing resources than ever, so Homo sapiens naturally does what it has always done when given new tools: it goes even bigger, higher, and bolder.

Via Pierre Levy
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DARPA Funds Python Big Data Effort -- InformationWeek

DARPA Funds Python Big Data Effort -- InformationWeek | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, which is spending $100 million over four years to advance big data technologies, recently awarded $3 million to develop data analytics and data processing libraries for popular computer programming language Python.

The funding, awarded to data visualization and analytics companyContinuum Analytics, will go toward the development of a scientific computing library for Python called Blaze and a visualization system called Bokeh, Continuum announced in a blog post.

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