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antropologo.net, dataviz, collective intelligence, algorithms, social learning, social change, digital humanities
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What the Intelligence Community Is Doing With Big Data

What the Intelligence Community Is Doing With Big Data | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
The intelligence community turns to big data to predict social unrest, election results, and currency collapse

Via Howard Rheingold
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Víctor Farré's curator insight, February 19, 2013 3:34 AM

Todo está escrito, pesado y contado, sólo hay que encontrarlo y relacionarlo.  

Jens Hoffmann's curator insight, April 5, 2013 5:31 PM

The intelligence community sponsors big data research to predict the likeliness of a popular revolt toppling a government, a deadly disease outbreak, a sudden currency collapse, or war.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, July 9, 2013 2:30 PM

Tendremos que buscar...ese es el reto.

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Now You See It // The Blog of Author Cathy N. Davidson » The History of Distraction, 4000 BCE to the Present

Now You See It // The Blog of Author Cathy N. Davidson » The History of Distraction, 4000 BCE to the Present | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

:"So think about this history of past Information Ages the next time you hear a pundit blame the Internet for distraction, multitasking, diluted memory, asocial behavior, shallowness, loneliness, isolation, intellectual dilution and so forth.   It may be the World Wide Web, or something else.  Socrates would have urged us to blame our distraction on the alphabet. . ."


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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, February 28, 2013 2:55 PM

Cathy Davidson, like Ann Blair, points out the fear of distraction and information overload that accompanied the emergence of past information technologies -- writing, the alphabet, print, and now the Web. We coevolve infotentional tools -- encyclopedias, silent reading, to cite just two examples -- in response to perceived overload.

Anne Macdonell's curator insight, May 14, 2013 8:26 AM

Yes! I agree. Distraction is highly overrated. Go with it.

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Memories of Another Future: Andrew Pickering on Cybernetics | CSISP Online

Memories of Another Future: Andrew Pickering on Cybernetics | CSISP Online | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Memories of Another Future: Andrew Pickering on Cybernetics ... http://t.co/KeRGqJO2ic

Via Ben van Lier
luiy's insight:

Utopian thinking has long been out of fashion in academia but there was a palpable sense of nostalgia in Andrew Pickerings talk last week for a time when scientific practice still seemed to hold the key to another world. Drawing on his book The Cybernetic Brain, Pickering offered cybernetics as an unrealised alternative future: a non-modern ontology of unknowability and becoming. In his account, cyberneticists undertook daring experiments with adaptive systems and ecologies, and in doing so they offered an alternative to the modern understanding of science as mastery over nature and the imposition of categories and hierarchies on the world. However, as his rousing talk also made clear, there are many shades of cybernetics to chose from. Pickering favoured the playful and performative experiments of the early cyberneticists over what he called “second order” cybernetics: the preoccupation with command and control and the epistemological analysis of situated observers.


Early experiments like William Ross Ashby’s homeostats, simple arrays of machines which could achieve balance through feedback loops, performed what he called a kind of “ontological theatre”. They staged “unknowability” by exploring their environment – in this case each other. In the realm of actual staged theatre, Gordon Pask’s ‘musicolour’ machine produced light shows by reacting to on-stage musician’s sounds. If their activities were not varied enough, the machine would “get bored” and prompt the performers to change tack. This complex distribution of action illustrates perfectly, Pickering’s concept of a “dance of agency” (see on this point also Cussins (1996) on ontological choreography). Indeed many of these cybernetic experiments could be seen as partially illustrating concepts later articulated in Science and Technologies Studies, such as the symmetry of human non-human and the entanglements between observer and observed.

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The Tweeted Times, un periódico de tu Timeline

The Tweeted Times, un periódico de tu Timeline | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Gracias a The Tweeted Times, podemos obtener una curación especial de contenido personalizado a través de nuestra cuenta de Twitter, y hacer un periódico.

Via L. García Aretio, Rui Guimarães Lima
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Cute cat theory of digital activism

Cute cat theory of digital activism | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
The cute cat theory of digital activism is a theory concerning Internet activism, Web censorship, and "cute cats" (a term used for any low-value, but popular online activity) developed by Ethan Zuckerman in 2008.

Via Clive McGoun, John Postill
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Glass Sculptures Of Bacteria And Viruses Brings Microbiology World To Human Scale

Glass Sculptures Of Bacteria And Viruses Brings Microbiology World To Human Scale | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Phrases like
luiy's insight:

Phrases like “viral art” or “infectious sculpture” only begin to provide an impression of what British artist Luke Jerram has created: human-scale glass sculptures of viruses, bacteria, and other organisms from the microbiological world. The sculptures aren’t just creative interpretations at approximately a million times larger scale, but derive from scientific images, models, and insights from the people who study them for a living.

 

Rendered in glass, the sculptures emphasize the structural aspects of these microbiological wonders. The allure to these designs may be in their simplicity and regularity, especially in the viruses.

 

Since he began collaborating with scientists and glass blowers to create sculptures in 2004, his work has shown up on the cover of Nature and been profiled in The Lancet,The New York Times, and other major media outlets. Recently, the artist announced that the Metropolitan Museum Of Art in New York has acquired some of his work for its permanent collection as well, adding to the long list of other museums where his work has been presented.

“People are automatically attracted to things of beauty. But when they realize actually what they are, there’s that element of…repulsion.” Luke said that the general response from people is positive, though some “feel that they might get infected if they touch them.”

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Mon manifeste du médium algorithmique. By Pierre Levy

This WordPress.com site is the bee's knees

Via Pierre Levy
luiy's insight:

Dans les sciences, l’économie ou la politique, les activités humaines sont de plus en plus fondées sur la gestion et l’analyse d’énormes masses de données numériques (Je traduis par « masses de données » ou « données massives » l’anglais « big data »). Même si nous n’en n’avons pas clairement conscience, notre société devient progressivement datacentrique. Parallèlement à cette évolution, nos communications – émettrices et réceptrices de données – reposent sur une infrastructure de plus en plus complexe de manipulation automatique de symboles que j’appelle le médium algorithmique. Mais aussi bien la société datacentrique que le médium algorithmique sur lequel elle repose n’en sont encore qu’à leurs timides commencements. L’essentiel de leur croissance et de leur développement reste encore à venir. De plus, les esprits restent fascinés par la puissance de diffusion de messages offerte par l’Internet, une puissance qui n’est pas loin d’avoir atteint son terme, alors qu’un immense espace – encore inexploré – s’ouvre à la transformation et à l’analyse du déluge de données que nous produisons quotidiennement. A l’avant-garde de la révolution algorithmique, IEML (ou tout autre système ayant les mêmes propriétés) va démocratiser la catégorisation et l’analyse automatique de l’océan de données. Son utilisation dans les médias sociaux va créer un environnement encore plus propice qu’aujourd’hui à l’apprentissage collaboratif et à la production de connaissances massivement distribuée. Ce faisant, IEML (ou quelqu’autre code sémantique universel) va contribuer à faire émerger le médium algorithmique du futur et permettre une réflexion de l’intelligence collective sur l’édification de la société datacentrique à venir.

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Pierre Levy's curator insight, February 17, 2013 6:13 PM

Une seconde version bien meilleure que la première!

Pierre Levy's curator insight, February 22, 2013 1:28 PM

Un extrait du Tome 2

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Digital Humanities 2.0: A Report on Knowledge

Digital Humanities 2.0: A Report on Knowledge | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Thirty years ago, the French philosopher and literary theorist Jean-François Lyotard published a prescient “report on knowledge” called The Postmodern Condition.

Via Pierre Levy
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The future is connected, messy, loose and open | Harold Jarche

The future is connected, messy, loose and open | Harold Jarche | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via Jesús Salinas, Rui Guimarães Lima
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How 'big data' is changing lives

How 'big data' is changing lives | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
A lifetime of data in a day? How 21st Century data deluges are changing the way we live. (The crazy world of big data. Digital babies arrive before analogue ones!!!!!!
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Predicting the Future of Computing | The New York Times

Predicting the Future of Computing | The New York Times | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Readers are invited to make predictions and collaboratively edit this timeline on the future of computing.

Via Elise C.
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Bones Don't Lie and Don't Forget

Bones Don't Lie and Don't Forget | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
After two decades the Forensic Anthropology Foundation of Guatemala (FAFG) remains dedicated to the work of listening to bones that "don't lie and don't forget." FAFG's work demands that we revisit chapters of history that have been deemed closed...
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Andrew Montemayor's curator insight, June 12, 2013 9:00 AM

Great video that deals with Clyde Snow's forensic work in Guatemala. 

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Cyber Anthropology: A Unified View of Communities ... - Lithosphere Community

Cyber Anthropology: A Unified View of Communities ... - Lithosphere Community | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Michael Wu, Ph.D. is Lithium's Principal Scientist of Analytics, digging into the complex dynamics of social interaction and group behavior in onl
luiy's insight:

Today I will give you a unified view of communities and social networks in an attempt to understand how these two social structures fit together. This post is a little more abstract and theoretical in nature – in comparison to previous posts – but I believe it will give you a novel perspective on the inner workings of social media.

 

The Social Networks inside Communities

As we’ve learned, most of the strong relationships in our personal social network (a.k.a.personal network) were developed in communities that were once part of our lives. Figure 1 illustrates the dynamics of a person (hypothetically Bob, the red dot in Figure 1) joining a community (yellow).

 

From personal experience, you probably recognize the fact that when someone joins a community, the rest of his personal network does not necessarily join with him. That is, your friends generally do not follow you everywhere, at least not immediately, and not all of them. Why is this? The main reason is because people have different interests and they have communities of their own. Upon joining the community and interacting with other community members, Bob would create weak ties (dotted lines). If the interactions were mutually desirable and have the proper environment to develop over time, then some of these emerging weak ties will grow into strong relationships, which will ultimately become part of Bob’s personal social network....

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New Documentary SILENCED Raising Money on Kickstarter to Tell the Story of Government Whistleblowers

New Documentary SILENCED Raising Money on Kickstarter to Tell the Story of Government Whistleblowers | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
When does telling the truth become a dangerous act?

Via John Postill
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The Biological Origin of Linguistic Diversity

In contrast with animal communication systems, diversity is characteristic of almost every aspect of human language. Languages variously employ tones, clicks, or manual signs to signal differences in meaning; some languages lack the noun-verb distinction (e.g., Straits Salish), whereas others have a proliferation of fine-grained syntactic categories (e.g., Tzeltal); and some languages do without morphology (e.g., Mandarin), while others pack a whole sentence into a single word (e.g., Cayuga). A challenge for evolutionary biology is to reconcile the diversity of languages with the high degree of biological uniformity of their speakers. Here, we model processes of language change and geographical dispersion and find a consistent pressure for flexible learning, irrespective of the language being spoken. This pressure arises because flexible learners can best cope with the observed high rates of linguistic change associated with divergent cultural evolution following human migration. Thus, rather than genetic adaptations for specific aspects of language, such as recursion, the coevolution of genes and fast-changing linguistic structure provides the biological basis for linguistic diversity. Only biological adaptations for flexible learning combined with cultural evolution can explain how each child has the potential to learn any human language.

 

The Biological Origin of Linguistic Diversity

Andrea Baronchelli, Nick Chater, Romualdo Pastor-Satorras, Morten H. Christiansen

http://arxiv.org/abs/1302.2937


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Sugata Mitra: Build a School in the Cloud

Onstage at TED2013, Sugata Mitra makes his bold TED Prize wish: Help me design the School in the Cloud, a learning lab in India, where children can explore and learn from each other -- using resources and mentoring from the cloud. Hear his inspiring vision for Self Organized Learning Environments (SOLE), and learn more at tedprize.org.


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NMC Horizon Report > 2013 Higher Education Edition | The New Media Consortium

NMC Horizon Report > 2013 Higher Education Edition | The New Media Consortium | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

The NMC Horizon Report > 2013 Higher Education Edition is a collaborative effort between the NMC and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI), an EDUCAUSE Program.

 

The tenth edition describes annual findings from the NMC Horizon Project, a decade-long research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in higher education. Six emerging technologies are identified across three adoption horizons over the next one to five years, as well as key trends and challenges expected to continue over the same period, giving campus leaders and practitioners a valuable guide for strategic technology planning.

The 2013 Horizon Project Higher Education Advisory Board initially voted on the top 12 emerging technologies — the result of which is documented in this a interim report: the NMC Horizon Project Short List > 2013 Higher Education Edition. This Short List then helped the advisory board narrow down the 12 technologies to six for the full publication. Those results are available in the official Preview. View the work that produced these findings at www.horizon.wiki.nmc.org.

 

Download the NMC Horizon Report > 2013 Higher Ed Edition PDF 
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Using the Internet and Social Media to Enhance Social-Emotional Learning

Using the Internet and Social Media to Enhance Social-Emotional Learning | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Engaging in various forms of social media is a routine activity that research has shown to benefit children and adolescents by enhancing communication, social connection, and even technical skills. Social media sites such as Facebook offer multiple daily opportunities for connecting with friends, classmates, and people with shared interests.

 


Via Nik Peachey, Mariano Fernandez S.
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, February 27, 2013 1:28 PM

Interesting article with some good links to research.

Angie Mc's curator insight, February 27, 2013 2:10 PM

Thorough, positive approach to social media for students.

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Big data and development organizations: What happens when you move from theory to practice?

Big data and development organizations: What happens when you move from theory to practice? | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

It all sounds very good in principle, but what happens when you explore big data for development in practice? It is this “learning by doing” philosophy that inspired our big data for development challenge with the World Bank and the UN Global Pulse.

 

Last week’s Masters of Networks provided the perfect opportunity for us to get hands-on and start delving into datasets.

 

First challenge: access to data. As Chris Kreutz noted, the world of big data is still, by and large, a world of closed data.

 

Luckily, the World Bank’s excellent open financial data site (including the details of World Bank contract awards) came to the rescue. It was great to see the eyes of data geeks shining when they realized the wealth of data sets available (development organizations, please take note: follow the Bank’s example!).......

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Las humanidades digitales y la fusión entre arte y ciencia

Las humanidades digitales y la fusión entre arte y ciencia | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via Pierre Levy
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Charlley Luz's comment, February 25, 2013 6:40 AM
Existe um "movimiento de las humanidades digitales que reconceptualiza a la era de la imprenta como un artefacto cultural que ya llegó a su ápice y está en reflujo." Será??
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The Geography of Happiness: Connecting Twitter sentiment and expression, demographics, and objective characteristics of place

We conduct a detailed investigation of correlations between real-time expressions of individuals made across the United States and a wide range of emotional, geographic, demographic, and health characteristics. We do so by combining (1) a massive, geo-tagged data set comprising over 80 million words generated over the course of several recent years on the social network service Twitter and (2) annually-surveyed characteristics of all 50 states and close to 400 urban populations. Among many results, we generate taxonomies of states and cities based on their similarities in word use; estimate the happiness levels of states and cities; correlate highly-resolved demographic characteristics with happiness levels; and connect word choice and message length with urban characteristics such as education levels and obesity rates. Our results show how social media may potentially be used to estimate real-time levels and changes in population-level measures such as obesity rates.

 

The Geography of Happiness: Connecting Twitter sentiment and expression, demographics, and objective characteristics of place

Lewis Mitchell, Kameron Decker Harris, Morgan R. Frank, Peter Sheridan Dodds, Christopher M. Danforth

http://arxiv.org/abs/1302.3299v2


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A Campaign Map, Morphed By Money : NPR

A Campaign Map, Morphed By Money : NPR | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

We've reshaped the United States based on where superPACs and other outside groups spent their money to air political ads aimed at influencing the presidential election.  The result?  One weirdly telling map.


Via Jack Loring
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Exploring the Significance of Digital Humanities for Philosophy

Exploring the Significance of Digital Humanities for Philosophy | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
On February 23, I was honored to speak at an Invited Symposium on Digital Humanities at the American Philosophical Association's Central Division Meeting in New Orleans. Organized by Cameron Buckne...
luiy's insight:

On February 23, I was honored to speak at an Invited Symposium on Digital Humanities at the American Philosophical Association’s Central Division Meeting in New Orleans. Organized by Cameron Buckner, who is a Founding Project Member of InPhO and one of the leaders of the University of Houston’s Digital Humanities Initiative, the session also featured great talks by Tony Beavers on computational philosophy and David Bourget on PhilPapers.

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Boston-Area Digital Humanities Consortium

Boston-Area Digital Humanities Consortium | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via Pierre Levy
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Pierre Levy's curator insight, February 22, 2013 10:35 PM

The Boston Digital Humanities Consortium is an informal association of educational and cultural institutions in New England committed to the collaborative development of teaching, learning, and scholarship in the digital humanities and computational social sciences.

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How Nature Inspires Technology - Forbes | artificial intelligence for students

How Nature Inspires Technology - Forbes | artificial intelligence for students | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
How Nature Inspires Technology Forbes Neural networks show how to manage big data from the Internet of Things. Situational awareness borrows ideas from human sensory systems to enhance public safety.
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