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e-Xploration
antropologo.net, dataviz, collective intelligence, algorithms, social learning, social change, digital humanities
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I Scoop Hadoop Schnoops! (or How Google and the CIA are shaping Big Data) - Forbes

I Scoop Hadoop Schnoops! (or How Google and the CIA are shaping Big Data) - Forbes | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Just recently, Svetlana Sicular, a research director at Gartner declared that Big Data had entered its “Trough of Disillusionment”. What was supposed to ensue was all types of negative sentiment about the space.
luiy's insight:

Data: Work for Me!

People expect technology tools and, more specifically, the data they hold, to serve them better.  Take the example of Foursquare, an application people use to “check-in” to specific locations (bars, restaurants, stores, etc).  The gamification built into it, allowed it to gain significant popularity. But, Big Data caught up and people started to ask: “why does checking in have to be so complicated?…and why doesn’t my phone perform some kind of service after it has checked me in?”  Everyone likes to brag about where they hang out and with whom, but we can sense there is more to do with the data…

Square, a company Tim O’Reilly talked about recently at Stanford, allows you to do just that.  Square helps businesses set up a point-of-sale in a snap. 

 

They plug in the SquareUp credit card reader into their mobile devices and they can magically accept credit card payment.  Square Wallet, an application users carry on their phone, can talk to the store’s SquareUp system based on location, authenticate the payer, and proceed with payment.  Let’s break this up:  Square knows you.  Square has your banking information.  Square has the store’s banking information.  Now, Square knows where you are.  And Square can do the shopping for you.  How is that for making Data work for you?

 

I know this might sound scary but it’s only a natural evolution of our data-driven world.  If you are building an application, you better build data at the center.  Make data work for the user.  Not the opposite.  People want it.  Trust me.  It’s not laziness.

 

This era spells the end of what I call “dumb devices”.  If you push the analogy further, you could ask all types of questions such as “why shouldn’t my car drive for me?” (check Sebastian Thrun’s Ted talk on Google’s driverless car project – they are actually safer) or maybe “why doesn’t my phone tell me when to leave for my next meeting?  (Check! – get Google Now).

 

In his talk, CIA’s Hunt describes this phenomenon as “the inanimate becoming sentient”.  It’s just the beginning.  That’s why Big Data is exciting.  Kids, buckle up!

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A tutorial on methods for the modeling and analysis of social network data

A tutorial on methods for the modeling and analysis of social network data | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via Pablo Torres
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Abstract

This article provides a tutorial review of some fundamental ideas and important methods for the modeling of empirical social network data. It describes basic concepts from graph theory and central elements from social network theory. It presents models for the network degree distribution and for network roles and positions, as well as algebraic approaches, before reviewing recent work on statistical methods to analyze social networks, including boot-strap procedures for testing the prevalence of network structures, basic edge- and dyad-independent statistical models, and more recent statistical network models that assume dependence, exponential random graph models and dynamic stochastic actor oriented models. Network social influence models are reviewed. The article concludes with a summary of new developments relating to models for time-ordered transactions.

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Sensors, Sensors, Everywhere: Will They Keep Us From Seeing For Ourselves?

Sensors, Sensors, Everywhere: Will They Keep Us From Seeing For Ourselves? | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
The sensors embedded in increasing numbers of devices are undoubtedly useful, but do we really need machines to replace our basic powers of observation?
luiy's insight:

Spidey-Sense Superpowers!

An example (also from CES) of a product that does this is the Lapka: an elegantly designed “personal environment monitor” that senses humidity, pesticides (via a small block you "plug in" to a fruit or vegetable via a headphone jack), electromagnetic fields and radiation, through a tactile interface of wooden and plastic blocks that tether to your smartphone for data display. I like this product because it makes accessible data about our physical environment that we previously could not get to unaided. That data lets us make better-informed decisions.

 

Basically, I want superpowers: I want devices and applications to help us achieve more as humans than we could without them.

 

Sometimes this might be about automating tasks, like the app EasilyDodoes, that don’t add value to our lives, such as merging duplicate contacts in our address book.

 

Other times it might be about giving us access to information about our circadian rhythm, like the larklife does, so we can optimize our energy for the things we care about most, like being creative at work or being with our families.

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PLEs desde la etnografía virtual de la web social

PLEs desde la etnografía virtual de la web social | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Abstract

 

This article presents an exploratory research based on the virtual ethnography from an environment of research and learning including new technologies. The ethnography is a method of qualitative research of social sciences that is mainly used in the socio-cultural Anthropology, where it has its theoretical basis. The target was to explore the web 2.0 and its tools. The process of participant observation is by means of a blog, other tools and virtual communities. The result is a descriptive model of the web 2.0 based on a Personal Learning Environment which developed in the ethnographic experience.

 

http://greav.ub.edu/der/index.php/der/article/view/193/333


Via Paulo Simões, juandoming
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NOOSPHERE | The Veritas Magazine

NOOSPHERE | The Veritas Magazine | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
In 1996 Francis Heylighen founded the Global Brain Group[7], created to discuss the emergence of a global brain out of the computer network, which would function as a nervous system for the human superorganism.

Via Spaceweaver
luiy's insight:

Science and noophere


In 1996, Roger Nelson developed the idea of attempting to register some indication of a global consciousness. It was the birth of the Global Consciousness Project (GCP), an international collaboration of scientists, engineers, artists and others, funded by private donations. He created an Internet-based array of continuously recording random numbers around the world. It resembles the placement of electrodes on a human head for electroencephalogram recordings. They collect data continuously from a global network of physical random number generators located in 65 host sites around the world. The Global Consciousness Project is an effort to capture some indications of the presence and activity of a global consciousness. Their purpose is to examine subtle correlations that may reflect the presence and activity of consciousness in the world.

 

Their preliminary result shows that a large-scale group consciousness has effects in the physical world. Indeed, they observe structure in what should be random data, associated with major global events. When millions of us share intentions and emotions the network data show meaningful departures from expectation! Roger Nelson says that global consciousness “coalesces only when great events bring us together, make us focus and temporarily share understanding and emotion.”The network is affected when powerful events in the world cause large numbers of people to pay attention to the same thing. These effects can be observed during focus of a great deal of attention, for example an event of worldwide expression of compassion like at the memorial ceremonies for Mother Teresa. They explain the observed effects by the interconnections and interactions of human beings all over the world, just as the mind is formed by the interaction of neurons in the brain.

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An emotional response: Using computers to analyse sentiments

An emotional response: Using computers to analyse sentiments | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Alamy THE difference between saying what you mean and meaning what you say is obvious to most people. To computers, however, it is trickier. Yet getting them to...
luiy's insight:

By applying and analysing emotional labels, the software can construct sentiment scores for the concepts mentioned in the text, as a combination of positive, negative and neutral results. For example, in the sentence, “The region's largest economies were still mired in recession,” the parser finds four of the words in the sentiment lexicon: largest (positive, neutral or negative); economies (positive or neutral); mired (negative); and recession (negative). It then analyses the sentence structure, starting with “economies” and progressing to “largest economies”, “region's largest economies” and “the region's largest economies”. At each stage, it computes the changing sentiment of the sentence. It then does the same for the second half of the sentence.

 

Instead of simply adding up the number of positive and negative mentions for each concept, the software applies a weighting to each one. For example, short pieces of text such as “region” are given less weight than longer ones such as “the region's largest economies”. Once the parser has reassembled the original text (“the region's largest economies were still mired in recession”) it can correctly identify the sentence as having a mainly negative meaning with respect to the concept of “economies”.

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Become a Crime-Fighting Superhero in Your Spare Time | Wired Business | Wired.com

Become a Crime-Fighting Superhero in Your Spare Time | Wired Business | Wired.com | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
A new wave of social networks are helping police and residents fight crime more collaboratively. (RT @owashb: Specialized social networks engender govt-citizen collaboration & smarter cities, e.g.

Via ParadigmGallery
luiy's insight:

In the first wave of online social crime-fighting, police used networks like Facebook and Twitter to ask for help identifying images of suspects and to broadcast messages over a large area like an entire city. Now a new, more targeted set of networks like Nextdoor are allowing residents to better police themselves and police to reach residents more efficiently. “What we saw happening very early on with Nextdoor is people were coming to us saying, ‘We’d like to be able to include our local police officer in our neighborhood,’” says co-founder Sarah Leary, who estimates about 20 percent of Nextdoor content is related to crime and safety.

 

The scam run by the burglars in Goodroe’s neighborhood worked like this: Two men carrying magazines knock on a door. If a homeowner answers, he gets a pitch for magazine subscriptions from one guy while the other scopes his valuables. If no one answers, the burglars let themselves in.

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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, March 29, 2013 6:17 PM

excerpt..."Becoming more aware of neighborhood crime can indeed be scary. But if enough people make the transition enabled by tools like Nextdoor and Nixle, from vaguely concerned resident to active community safety participant, they may yet prove that online social networks can have an impact beyond spreading viral videos, enriching Wall Street investors, and trading baby photos.....

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Stigmergy in human practice: Coordination in construction work

Stigmergy in human practice: Coordination in construction work | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Some excerpts from Lars' paper. When the concept of stigmergy was first introduced in 1959 by the French entomologist Pierre-Paul Grassé (1959), an important step towards understanding the coordina...

Via Alessio Erioli
luiy's insight:

When the concept of stigmergy was first introduced in 1959 by the French entomologist Pierre-Paul Grassé (1959), an important step towards understanding the coordination of collective activities in social insects was made. Today, the concept of stigmergy is well established within the field of entomology (Theraulaz and Bonabeau, 1999). Turning from the study of insect behaviour to the study of human practice we find the concept of stigmergy to be less well established. However, criteria for applying the concept of stigmergy to the study of human practice are in fact readily emerging and a series of interesting and illuminating studies of stigmergy in a human context has been published (e.g. Christensen, 2008; Marsh & Onof, 2008; Ricci et al., 2007; Susi & Ziemke, 2001; Tummolini & Castelfrananchi, 2007; Parunak, 2006). This paper aims to contribute to this body of literature. Building on Grassé (1959), we will argue that that a coordinative effect can occur when human individuals act on the physical traces of work accomplished previously by others. That is, we will say that actors may coordinate and integrate their cooperative efforts by acting directly on the physical traces of work previously accomplished by others and that signs left or modifications made by individuals on artifacts may, given an appropriate context of practice, become meaningful to others and in turn inspire new actions on artifacts. This is how stigmergy may unfold in a human context. However, in connection to the study of stigmergy in a human context we need to ask a fundamental question before we “get ahead of ourselves.” The question is this:


Does the concept of stigmergy add anything to our ability to account for the coordination of cooperative work in a human context?

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Paris 1900-2013 en photos: pilotez notre fabuleuse machine à remonter le temps

Paris 1900-2013 en photos: pilotez notre fabuleuse machine à remonter le temps | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Dix autochromes, commandés par un riche banquier, de la capitale au siècle dernier... en face de dix photos, prises par nous cette année. Rue89 vous invite à sentir le temps passé.


Via Luca Baptista
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Le Guide du #Crowdfunding & analyse pistes de financement ! par Nicolas Dehorter

Le Guide du #Crowdfunding & analyse pistes de financement ! par Nicolas Dehorter | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

"Je suis Nicolas Dehorter, auteur du premier guide français sur le crowdfunding, j’analyse et publie régulièrement sur ce blog du contenu lié aux solutions innovantes de financement et de partage de la création qui émergent grâce au web. D’une curiosité maladive, j’aime me promener partout où il y a de l’art et du talent, à l’affût d’énergies créatives.

 

Je me passionne, vous l’avez déjà pressenti, pour cette nouvelle génération de jeunes ou moins jeunes cinéastes qui n’hésitent pas à redéfinir le modèle classique de production et de diffusion pour réussir à s’exprimer. Ils n’ont pas peur de s’appuyer sur leur public pour s’affirmer créer librement. Il y a maintenant plus d’un an je suis parti à Madrid pour assister et étudier l’utilisation par les membres de Riot Cinema Collective, des nouvelles solutions de financement et de partage, que  sont le crowdfunding  et les licences Creative Commons. Je suis revenu toujours plus convaincu que l’avenir du cinéma et au-delà de la création indépendante passera par internet et les solutions qui se développent autour dans cette dimension participative." ...


Via Jacques Urbanska
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Graphic Advocacy Posters

Graphic Advocacy Posters | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Graphic Advocacy: International Posters for the Digital Age 2001-2012 showcases a selection of 122 posters to offer the public a chance to experience this magnificent body of empathetic and visually compelling messages for our time.
luiy's insight:
Graphic Posters for Social Change
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Home : MelNet

Home : MelNet | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Home page in the MelNet website
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PNetPNet is a program for the simulation and estimation of exponential random graph models (ERGMs) for social networks.
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#SNA: Untangling the webs of immigration lobbying

#SNA: Untangling the webs of immigration lobbying | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
(Visualizations by Alexander Furnas and Amy Cesal) As Congress inches toward major immigration legislation, a new Sunlight Foundation analysis (based on almost 8,000 lobbying reports) offers a comprehensive and interactive guide to the web of...
luiy's insight:

As Congress inches toward major immigration legislation, a new Sunlight Foundation analysis (based on almost 8,000 lobbying reports) offers a comprehensive and interactive guide to the web of interests with something at stake.

 

As legislation continues to take shape, a wide range of sectors will continue flooding Congress with their lobbyists, trying to make sure that their particular concerns are fully addressed. These visualizations can help to better understand who these interests are, what they care about, and how intensely they are likely to lobby to get what they want.

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Info Vis Lab - Indiana University publications

Info Vis Lab - Indiana University publications | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
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Murdock, Jaimie, Robert Light, Colin Allen, and Katy Börner. "Mapping the Intersection of Science & Philosophy". Joint Conference on Digital Libraries (JCDL).Reijnhoudt, Linda, Rodrigo Costas, Ed Noyons, Katy Börner, and Andrea Scharnhorst. "‘Seed+Expand’: A validated methodology for creating high quality publication oeuvres of individual researchers". ISSI 2013.Light, Robert, Chin Hua Kong, and Katy Börner. "An Automated System for Tracking the Growth of Expert Profiling Systems". Joint Conference on Digital Libraries (JCDL).Skupin, Andre, Joseph R. Biberstine, and Katy Börner. "Visualizing the Topical Structure of the Medical Sciences: A Self-Organizing Map Approach". PLoS ONE.Zoss, Angela, and Katy Börner. "Evolving Visualizations of Scholarly Activity: Comparison and Evaluation".Börner, Katy, Robin M. Wagner, Nianli Ma, Joseph R. Biberstine, Rediet Berhane, Hong Jiang, Susan E. Ivey, Katrina Pearson, and Carl McCabe. "Introducing the Science of Science (Sci2) Tool to the Reporting Branch, Office of Extramural Research/Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health".Workshop on the Science of Science Measurement, December 2-3, 2010, Washington D.C..
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Swarm intelligence - Wikipedia

Swarm intelligence (SI) is the collective behavior of decentralized, self-organized systems, natural or artificial. The concept is employed in work on artificial intelligence. The expression was introduced by Gerardo Beni and Jing Wang in 1989, in the context of cellular robotic systems.[1]

SI systems are typically made up of a population of simple agents or boids interacting locally with one another and with their environment. The inspiration often comes from nature, especially biological systems. The agents follow very simple rules, and although there is no centralized control structure dictating how individual agents should behave, local, and to a certain degree random, interactions between such agents lead to the emergence of "intelligent" global behavior, unknown to the individual agents. Natural examples of SI include ant colonies, bird flocking, animal herding, bacterial growth, and fish schooling.

The application of swarm principles to robots is called swarm robotics, while 'swarm intelligence' refers to the more general set of algorithms. 'Swarm prediction' has been used in the context of forecasting problems.

Swarm intelligence (SI) is the collective behaviour of decentralized, self-organized systems, natural or artificial. The concept is employed in work on artificial intelligence. The expression was introduced by Gerardo Beni and Jing Wang in 1989, in the context of cellular robotic systems.[1]
SI systems are typically made up of a population of simple agents or boids interacting locally with one another and with their environment. The inspiration often comes from nature, especially biological systems. The agents follow very simple rules, and although there is no centralized control structure dictating how individual agents should behave, local, and to a certain degree random, interactions between such agents lead to the emergence of "intelligent" global behavior, unknown to the individual agents. Natural examples of SI include ant colonies, bird flocking, animal herding, bacterial growth, and fish schooling.
The application of swarm principles to robots is called swarm robotics, while 'swarm intelligence' refers to the more general set of algorithms. 'Swarm prediction' has been used in the context of forecasting problems.


Via Sigalon
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Co-presence as ethnographic approach

Much of the ethnographic work that goes on at the VKS has been shaped by the tradition of ethnographic lab studies from Science and Technology Studies. These past couple of years, as the VKS has ex...
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Why Your Next Phone Will Include Fingerprint, Facial, and Voice Recognition - Forbes

Why Your Next Phone Will Include Fingerprint, Facial, and Voice Recognition - Forbes | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
(Source: Vibe.com) What an iPhone with fingerprint scanning might look like In some ways, it’s a marvel that even half of consumers bother to lock their phones.

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In some ways, it’s a marvel that even half of consumers bother to lock their phones.

You would think the benefits would be obvious enough: by entering a few numbers, you can achieve a basic level of protection from prying eyes.  But according to a recent study, 44% of users said that even this was too much of a hassle – worse, 30% weren’t even worried about mobile security at all.  From 0000 to 9999 there are 10,000 possible combinations of digits, yet in a sample of 3.4 million passwords, over 10% were cases in which somebody decided that “1234″ was their best choice.

For years now, consumers have been demanding a better way, something more convenient and less time-consuming.  As it turns out, they may have had the answer all along without even knowing it – their body parts can serve as their next password.  Biometric identification, which works by using the unique characteristics of your body to prove who you are, may be the key to a much more effective system.

In fact, it is an almost certainty that within the next few years, three biometric options will become standard features in every new phone: a fingerprint scanner built into the screen, facial recognition powered by high-definition cameras, and voice recognition based off a large collection of your vocal samples.


Via Wildcat2030
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curiousjohn's comment, March 30, 2013 6:24 PM
Actually, fingerprints can be spoofed quite easily, but "finger-vein-prints" are far more secure technology already being produced, though the requisite hardware isn't as small making it a less viable alternative for mobile devises, for now anyways.
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LumiBots | Robots and Avatars

LumiBots | Robots and Avatars | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Mey Lean Kronemann Germany   robotics // swarm robot installation robot platform developed by Mey Lean Kronemann and Philipp Urbanz...
luiy's insight:

robotics // swarm robot installation


robot platform developed by Mey Lean Kronemann and Philipp Urbanz

The lumiBots are a swarm of small, autonomous robots that react to light. Equipped with a UV-LED at their tail, they can leave phosphorescent trails on a glow-in-the-dark mat.

 

The trails slowly fade away, so that older, darker lines are visible as well as newer, brighter ones. In this way, generative images are created that consistently change.


The lines do not only tell the story of the robots’ movements, but have a deeper meaning for the lumiBots: They can follow the other robots’ as well as their own trails, and amplify them, thus creating an ant-trail-like mechanism.

The behaviour of the lumiBots is not pre-programmed and not predictable. It emerges from the interaction between the robots, influences from their surroundings, and just two simple rules: ‘Go where it is brighter’ and ‘Change direction when the bump sensors are triggered’. Due to small hardware inaccuracies they are all individuals, even though built and programmed the same. The robots do not have a memory chip, but the glowing trails can be seen as a kind of external memory.


lumiBots – short documentation from
Mey Lean Kronemann on Vimeo. 

 

The lumiBots are both a science and an art project. They visualize how complexity emerges from simple rules and illustrate the principle that underlies complex systems such as flocks of birds, the weather, or global phenomena.

 

The system currently consists of nine hemispheric robots of 12 cm diameter in an arena of approx. 1m x 2m in a darkened room.

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Truth, Lies, and 'Doxxing': The Real Moral of the Gawker/Reddit Story. by Danah Boyd

Truth, Lies, and 'Doxxing': The Real Moral of the Gawker/Reddit Story. by Danah Boyd | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Photo: dave lewis 88 / Flickr Sitting U.S. President Ford was visiting San Francisco in 1975 when a woman attempted to shoot him. A former marine named

Via Pierre Levy
luiy's insight:
The ‘Koan’: Technology as Tool and Technology as Weapon

By enabling the rapid flow of information, technology offers us a unique tool to publicly out people or collectively tar and feather them. Well-meaning people may hope to spread their messages far and wide using Twitter or Facebook, but the fast-spreading messages tend to be sexual, horrific, or humiliating.

 

Gossip is social currency. And in a networked world, trafficking in gossip is far easier than ever before.

 

When someone’s been wronged – or the opportunity arises to use someone to make a statement – it is relatively easy to leverage social media to incite the hive mind to draw attention to an individual. The same tactic that trolls use to target people is the same tactic that people use to out trolls.

More often than not, those who use these tools do so when they feel they’re on the right side of justice. They’re either shining a spotlight to make a point or to shame someone into what they perceive to be socially acceptable behavior. But each act of outing has consequences for the people being outed, even if we do not like them or what they’ve done.

 

This raises serious moral and ethical concerns: In a networked society, who among us gets to decide where the moral boundaries lie? This isn’t an easy question and it’s at the root of how we, as a society, conceptualize justice.

Governance and the construction of a society is not a fact of life; it’s a public project that we must continuously make and remake. Networked technologies are going to increasingly put pressure on our regulatory structures as conflicting social values crash into one another. In order to benefit from innovation, we must also suffer the destabilizing aspects of new technology.

Yet … that destabilization and suffering allow us, as a society, to interrogate our collective commitments. The hard moral conundrums are just beginning.

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Pierre Levy's curator insight, March 29, 2013 4:04 PM

As the Gawker/Reddit story was unfolding, another seemingly disconnected case was playing out. In a town outside of Vancouver, a young woman named Amanda Todd committed suicide a few weeks after posting a harrowing YouTube video describing an anonymous stalker she felt ruined her life. The amorphous hacktivist collective known as “Anonymous” decided to make a spectacle of the situation by publishing personally identifiable information on – “doxxing” – Todd’s stalker. They identified a 32-year-old man, enabling outraged people to harass him. Yet it appears they got the wrong person. Earlier this week, Canadian police reported that Todd’s stalker was someone else: reportedly a 19-year-old.

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Cyber warfare: where are the limits?

Cyber warfare: where are the limits? | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

After months of the US national security establishment sounding the alarm on the need to defend against potential cyber threats, questions are again being raised about how far the US itself is pioneering offensive cyber policy.


Via Luca Baptista
luiy's insight:

"NATO itself is not saying that it was an act of force, it was just a group of scholars and scientist who investigated it, but if it was reversed, and say the US was the victim of this, then I think it could be more a political outcome and could give more of a reason for the US to perhaps want to try to shut down Iran's uranium enrichment plants."

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Doctors Use Big Data to Improve Cancer Treatments

Doctors Use Big Data to Improve Cancer Treatments | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
The American Society of Clinical Oncology is looking to personalize and improve cancer care by tapping into data from millions of patients.
luiy's insight:

The organization completed the prototype for CancerLinQ, a "learning health system" that collects and analyzes anonymous patient information to provide immediate feedback and guidance for physicians.

Very little is known about most people's experiences with cancer because information is locked in unconnected servers and paper files, says Sandra M. Swain, president of ASCO. Only 3% of cancer patients participate in clinical trials, but that small percentage isn't reflective of patients doctors see every day.

Privacy issues are a major concern with medical information but the organization says the prototype has undergone extensive technological and legal analysis.

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Reanimating Networks with Agent Modeling

Reanimating Networks with Agent Modeling | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
I'm presenting next week at the Society for American Archaeology Annual Meeting. I'm giving two papers. One argues for parsimonious models when we do agent based modeling.  The other reverses the f...
luiy's insight:
Graham weingart connected past reanimating networks with agent modeling from DoctorG

Roman epigraphy easily lends itself to network analysis. Stamped brick for instance lets one string together, like pearls, individual landowners, estate names, individual brick makers, signa, brick fabrics, and locations. This leads to very complicated, multi-dimensional networks.

 

When I first started working with this material, I reduced this complexity by looking only at the humans, whom I tied together based on appearing in the same stamp type together. I called these ‘producer’ networks. I then looked at the ties implied by the shared use of fabrics, or the co-location of brick stamp types at various findspots, and called these ‘manufacturing’ networks.

I then sliced these networks up by reigning dynasty, and developed a story to account for their changing shapes over time.

 

This was in the late 1990s, and in terms of network theorists I had largely only Granovetter, Hanneman & Riddle, and Strogatz & Watts to go on. The story I told was little more than a just-so story, like how the Camel got its Hump.

I had the shape, I had points where I could hang the story, but I couldn’t account for how I got from the shape of the network in the Julio-Claudian period, to that of the Flavian, to that of the Antonines.

 

In this talk today, I want to reverse the direction of my inquiry. We are all agreed that we can find networks in our archaeological materials. The problem, I think, for us, is to explain the network processes that produce these patterns, and then to use our understanding of those processes to narrow down the possible entangled human & thing interactions that could give rise to these possible processes.

 

We need to be able to understand the possible behaviour-spaces that could produce the networks we see, to tease out the inevitable from the contingent. We need to be able to rigorously explore the emergent or unintended consequences of the stories we tell. The only way I know how to do that systematically, is to encode those stories as computer code, to turn them from normal, archaeological storytelling rhetoric, to computational procedural rhetoric.

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How Programmers Relate based on Google Searches | Exploring Data

How Programmers Relate based on Google Searches | Exploring Data | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
The programmers search relations visualization shows a network graph of programmers related by Google searches with results containing knowledge graph information.

Via ukituki
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Rescooped by luiy from Complexity Science
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Sociology and Complexity Science blog: Tomas Saraceno Complexity Art and Networks

Sociology and Complexity Science blog: Tomas Saraceno Complexity Art and Networks | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via Jacques CLOS, Ankur Dnyanmote
luiy's insight:

In 2010 my family and i were on tour (our term for vacationing) in Scandinavia, en route to Gothenburg, Sweden for the International Sociological Association Meetings.  During our stay in Copenhagen I came across the work of Tomás Saraceno--internationally recognized architect and artist.


Saraceno's work melted my mind.  He presented a possible future, grounded in a global complexity and ecology, exploring the usage of networks in three-dimensional form; along with other various organic-geometrical forms.

Recently, again, I saw his work, now in New York City at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where my brother Warren lives.  WOW!  I will definitely have to blog more on Saraceno's work and how it connects with the complexity art movement I have been blogging about.  But, for now, I just wanted to get a post published on this guy.

Here are a few links to some of his work:

http://www.coolhunting.com/culture/14-billion.php ;

http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2009/06/09/saraceno/

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#SNA: An incredible map of which countries e-mail each other, and why

#SNA: An incredible map of which countries e-mail each other, and why | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
The U.S. falls closest Israel, Switzerland and Italy
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