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The Digital Humanities as a Big Data Conference

The Digital Humanities as a Big Data Conference | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

The IEEE International Conference on Big Data in July will feature a workshop on Big Data in digital humanities scholarship–which its organizers refer to as Big Humanities.

 

It’s hard to tell what big data means these days. Is 30,000 British people enough? How about 50,000 species in a biodiversity database? Or 2600 diaries from an archaeological dig? What about ORBIS? There are only 2000 or so official route segments, but given all the permutations, there are trillions of possible “routes”. The simple fact is that big data in the big data world is very big (Twitter is up to 400 million tweets a day at last count) and that means you need to deal with the sum total of human writing or all the anime ever produced to even hope to claim that kind of big data status.

 

But I’m starting to think “big data” is just another way of saying “distant reading” or “macroanalysis” or “global perspective”. If that’s the case, then the you-must-be-this-tall to get into big data isn’t really that much of a restriction at all, because these techniques and methods can be deployed for quite small data. The real identifying trait is that all of these represent a computational approach to newly available data that are infeasible to analyze individually and which require some processing methods to transform from relatively unstructured data to aggregated, categorized, and/or quantified data.

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| Full text | Social network analysis and agent-based modeling in social epidemiology

Abstract: The past five years have seen a growth in the interest in systems approaches in epidemiologic research. These approaches may be particularly appropriate for social epidemiology. Social network analysis and agent-based models (ABMs) are two approaches that have been used in the epidemiologic literature. Social network analysis involves the characterization of social networks to yield inference about how network structures may influence risk exposures among those in the network. ABMs can promote population-level inference from explicitly programmed, micro-level rules in simulated populations over time and space. In this paper, we discuss the implementation of these models in social epidemiologic research, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of each approach. Network analysis may be ideal for understanding social contagion, as well as the influences of social interaction on population health. However, network analysis requires network data, which may sacrifice generalizability, and causal inference from current network analytic methods is limited. ABMs are uniquely suited for the assessment of health determinants at multiple levels of influence that may couple with social interaction to produce population health. ABMs allow for the exploration of feedback and reciprocity between exposures and outcomes in the etiology of complex diseases. They may also provide the opportunity for counterfactual simulation. However, appropriate implementation of ABMs requires a balance between mechanistic rigor and model parsimony, and the precision of output from complex models is limited. Social network and agent-based approaches are promising in social epidemiology, but continued development of each approach is needed.

 

Source: http://archive.biomedcentral.com/1742-5573/content/9/1/1

luiy's insight:

The systems approaches discussed here, social network analysis and agent-based modeling, have the potential to reframe social epidemiology. Chiefly, these tools allow investigators to move social epidemiology beyond the "independent effects" paradigm that some describe as conceptually inappropriate [32,35] and reframe our pursuit of the complex social causes of health and disease in a holistic framework. In addition, these approaches allow investigators to understand the etiologic implications of heterogeneity within the population, social interaction, and environmental influence simultaneously, and to explore mechanistic interactions, feedback loops, and reciprocity between exposures and outcomes. Moreover, they can better articulate and provide a framework for analyzing the health effects of social interaction. Finally, the counterfactual approach made possible by agent-based modeling may promote causal thinking in social epidemiology and improve our mechanistic understanding and conceptual articulation of exposures when considering the social production of health.

However, several limitations need to be addressed as these approaches become more prevalent in social epidemiologic research. Considerable methodological development is needed in the area of longitudinal social network approaches to improve causal inference from social network analysis. Furthermore, social epidemiologists interested in agent-based approaches to etiologic inquiry need to develop "best practices" with regard ABM design, parameterization, interpretation, and validation in population health research.

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SIMILE Widgets - Open Source Widgets for Data Visualization

SIMILE Widgets - Open Source Widgets for Data Visualization | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, March 5, 2013 2:02 AM

This is an open-source “spin-off” from theSIMILE project at MIT. Here we offer free, open-source web widgets, mostly for data visualizations. They are maintained and improved over time by a community of open-source developers.

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Scanadu permet aux smartphones d’établir des diagnostics médicaux

Scanadu permet aux smartphones d’établir des diagnostics médicaux | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Scanadu construit des appareils qui permettent aux patients de mieux connaître leur santé et celle de leurs proches.


 
Rencontre à l’occasion de Learning Expédition eSanté organisée par l’Atelier dans la Silicon Valley.

Via Emmanuel Capitaine
luiy's insight:

Rencontre à l’occasion de Learning Expédition eSanté organisée par l’Atelier dans la Silicon Valley.

 

Selon un rapport publié par l’institut de recherche ON World, 18,2 millions de senseurs utilisés pour la santé et le bien être seront expédié en 2017, générant 16,3 milliards de dollars en terme de revenu annuel. En 2012, on en a dénombré 1,7 millions, représentant déjà 4,9 milliards de dollars. Cette croissance considérable représente un marché absolument gigantesque. En effet, de plus en plus de start-ups de e-santé s’intéressent à ces capteurs placés sur des appareils mobiles ou positionnables sur le corps. Une pratique qui permet d’opérer tout type de mesure afin de s’informer sur sa santé et ses habitudes de vie, et aussi de mieux prévenir tout type de maladie. Pas de bien-être ou de fitness pour Scanadu, qui fabrique des appareils dont la qualité est équivalente à ceux du corps médical, et qui permettent à chaque patient de surveiller et comprendre sa santé et celle de ses proches. La start-up a pour cela développé trois produits différents qui ne sont pas encore commercialisés : Scanadu SCOUT, Project ScanaFlu et Project ScanaFlo.

 

 

Des examens médicaux à faire depuis depuis son salon

 

Scanadu a développé une technologie qui analyse différents types d’informations comme l’image, le son, ou encore les molécules ; des données traitées permettent par la suite à l’utilisateur d’avoir une fenêtre compréhensible sur sa santé. Le premier appareil, Scanadu SCOUT, est un petit thermomètre frontal qui permet à son utilisateur de calculer son pouls, son rythme et son activité cardiaque, sa température, ou encore l’oxygénation de son sang. Les données récoltées par cet appareil sont transmises à l’application mobile qui y est reliée, offrant au patient une vue complète sur ses information de santé. ScanaFlo est un petit outil qui permet d’analyser l’urine dans le cas de diabète ou encore d’infections urinaires. ScanaFlu est un test qui permet à son utilisateur de détecter l’apparition de la grippe. A terme, les trois appareils doivent pouvoir communiquer via la même application mobile qui centralise alors toutes les données du patient et de ses proches.

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Pascal GIGOT's curator insight, May 1, 2013 6:24 AM

Le concept du Home Care à l'américaine est-il implantable en France?

Thibaud Guymard's comment, September 5, 2013 6:19 PM
Merci Luiy pour ces précisions. C'est un projet et des produits que je suis de très près. Le Quantified Self santé/médical se développe rapidement et il reste aux acteurs à prouver l'amélioration ou le service rendu par ces devices aux patients. Un challenge passionnant.
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The Science of What We Do (and Don't) Know About Data Visualization

The Science of What We Do (and Don't) Know About Data Visualization | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Visualization is easy, right? After all, it's just some colorful shapes and a few text labels. But things are more complex than they seem, largely due to the the ways we see and digest charts, graphs, and other data-driven images. While scientifically-backed studies do exist, there are actually many things we don't know about how and why visualization works. To help you make better decisions when visualizing your data, here's a brief tour of the research.

luiy's insight:

We only scratched the surface on this, there are many other metaphors that are used in visualization, whether obvious or not. Barbara Tversky and Jeff Zacks found in the early 2000s that lines imply transitions whereas bars imply individual values. The seemingly simple choice between a bar and a line chart has implications on how we perceive the data.

 

Bizarrely, so does gravity. In our work on metaphors, Ziemkiewicz and I found that people interpreted round shapes as unstable because, they said, they might roll away. But to roll, there must be a force that causes the movement. After studying this effect some more, we found that the points in a scatterplot attract each other, and that they are seemingly pulled down by gravity. We remember points not where they are in the plot, but shift them towards clusters in our memory, and let them drift slightly downwards.

 

Findings and distinctions in visualization can be subtle, but they can have a profound impact on how well we can read the information and how we interpret it. There is much more to be learned about how visualization works and how best we can represent, analyze, and communicate data.

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Torbjörn Ungvall's curator insight, April 29, 2013 6:41 AM

Findings and distinctions in visualization can be subtle, but they can have a profound impact on how well we can read the information and how we interpret it...

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Serendipia - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre

Una serendipia es un descubrimiento o un hallazgo afortunado e inesperado que se produce cuando se está buscando otra cosa distinta. También puede referirse a la habilidad de un sujeto para reconocer que ha hecho un descubrimiento importante aunque no tenga relación con lo que busca. En términos más generales se puede denominar así también a la casualidad, coincidencia o accidente.

En la historia de la ciencia son frecuentes las serendipias. Por ejemplo, Albert Einstein reconoce esta cualidad en algunos de sus hallazgos. También existen casos de serendipias en obras literarias, cuando un autor escribe sobre algo que ha imaginado y que no se conoce en su época, y se demuestra posteriormente que eso existe tal como lo definió el escritor, con los mismos detalles. No se debe confundir con la anticipación o la ciencia-ficción, donde se adelantan inventos mucho más genéricos que casi todo el mundo cree que probablemente existirán algún día.

El término serendipia deriva del inglés serendipity, neologismo acuñado por Horace Walpole en 1754 a partir de un cuento tradicional persa llamado «Los tres príncipes de Serendip», en el que los protagonistas, unos príncipes de la isla Serendip —que era el nombre árabe de la isla de Ceilán, la actual Sri Lanka—, solucionaban sus problemas a través de increíbles casualidades. Las versiones inglesas del relato provienen del libro Peregrinaggio di tre giovani figluoli del re di Serendippo publicado en Venecia en 1557 por Michele Tramezzino, según traducción de Christoforo Armeno.[1][2] El cuento se recoge en el libro de poemas de 1302 Hasht Bihist ("Ocho paraísos") de Amir Kushrau.[2]

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Penalités algorithmiques ou manuelles (Google) ? > Blog AxeNet

Penalités algorithmiques ou manuelles (Google) ? > Blog AxeNet | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Comment mieux distinguer les pénalités de Google réalisées par l'algo ou un humain.

Via Dominique Cardon
luiy's insight:
Les pénalités manuelles.

C’est la charmante équipe de Matt Cutts qui vous les inflige. Un véritable humain de chair et d’os est passé par là et a jugé que votre site avait des pratiques contraires aux guidelines de Google.

Dans les cas de pénalité manuelle, vous êtes alerté par un message sur votre compte Google webmaster Tools (au passage, Olivier Duffez à fait un bon récap de tous les messages possibles que l’on pouvait recevoir sur GWT). Il est donc indispensable d’avoir un compte Google pour être prévenu.

Pour ma part, les seules pénalités que j’ai pu voir étaient afférentes à une suspicion de liens artificiels ou « non naturels ».

 

Les pénalités algorithmiques.

Les pénalités d’algo les plus connues sont les filtres Panda et Pingouin.
La spécificité de ces filtres est qu’ils s’appliquent globalement à tous les sites concernés par les modifications d’algo ( avec parfois quelques dommages collatéraux). Ils ne font jamais l’objet d’une alerte ou message personnel dans Webmaster Tools !


La confirmation de Matt Cutts:

Une fois le site corrigé (à condition d’avoir trouvé pourquoi il était pénalisé), il faudra attendre le prochain update du filtre pour voir si votre action a fonctionné.

On note qu’un porte-parole de Google a annoncé que pour Panda, le filtre serait à priori maintenant mis à jour en continu, ce qui devrait permettre de sortir du trou plus rapidement pour ceux qui ont été pénalisés. Notons aussi qu’il n’y a pas que Panda et Pingouin dans la vie, les pénalités existaient bien avant.

À retenirAucune information ne vous est transmise dans webmasters Tools dans le cas d’une pénalité algorithmique.
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Research Images | Nicholas Christakis, MD, PhD – HUMAN NATURE LAB at Harvard University


Via Lamia Ben
luiy's insight:

This graph shows the largest connected subcomponent involving 2,200 individuals in 2000 from the Framingham Heart Study Social Network. Each node represents one person. Nodes with blue borders are men and those with red borders are women. The size of each node is proportional to the person’s body-mass index. The interior color of the circles indicates the person’s obesity status: yellow denotes an obese person (body-mass index, ≥30) and green denotes a non-obese person. The colors of the ties between the nodes indicate the relationship between them: purple denotes a friendship or marital tie and orange denotes a familial tie (e.g., siblings).


Clusters of obese and non-obese individuals are visible in the network, as confirmed by mathematical models discussed in the paper. These clusters are not only due to individuals of similar body size preferentially forming ties, but also due to influence, whereby one person’s body size affects that of another. For more details, see: N.A. Christakis and J.H. Fowler, “The Spread of Obesity in a Large Social Network Over 32 Years,” New England Journal of Medicine 2007; 35: 370-379. [download hi-res]

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Lamia Ben's curator insight, April 28, 2013 4:16 AM

A great collection of Social Network Analysis Studies from Human Nature Lab at Harvard

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Call for interest - an OER for training teacher trainers | eLearning

Call for interest - an OER for training teacher trainers | eLearning | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

The International Council for Open and Distance Education (ICDE) invites expressions of interest for producing courseware in the form of an open educational resource for training teacher trainers in high quality open, distance and online learning. The target group for this call is an institution or consortium of actors/ institutions and the initial focus of the project is Africa.

Open, distance and online learning is rapidly expanding in universities and colleges in Africa and Asia, but faculty training has not caught up with the speed of development. According to the African Union Commission, the number of new teachers required in Africa by the year 2015 is estimated to be 3.6 million.

 

Online training using OERs will facilitate mass training of teacher trainers, which again will facilitate trained teachers in filling the huge gap in demand for educators in Africa. By using OERs, courseware can be adapted to different cultures and languages.

 

The OER/ courseware to receive an ICDE grant should focus on the needs of teacher trainers to deliver high quality faculty training in open and distance/ online learning. The first regional area of priority should be Africa. A regional focus on Asia will be considered when the project has delivered. 

 

The expressions of interest must be submitted to the ICDE Secretariat, icde@icde.org byFriday 31 May 2013. ICDE will invite a smaller selection of applicants to deliver a bid in the form of a project proposal. One successful bidder will be invited to enter into a contract with ICDE.  The value of the grant is USD 8,500.

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GIS and Agent-Based Modelling: Social Media and the Emergence of Open-Source Geospatial Intelligence

GIS and Agent-Based Modelling: Social Media and the Emergence of Open-Source Geospatial Intelligence | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via Paulo Félix
luiy's insight:

We have just finished a paper entitled 'Social Media and the Emergence of Open-Source Geospatial Intelligence' for Socio-Cultural Dynamics and Global Security. For those interested below is the abstract: The emergence of social media has provided the public with an effective and irrepressible real-time mechanism to broadcast information. The great popularity of platforms such as twitter and YouTube, and the substantial amount of content that is communicated through them are making social media an essential component of open-source intelligence. The information communicated through such feeds conveys the interests and opinions of individuals, and reveals links and the complex structure of social networks. However, this information is only partially exploited if one does not consider its geographical aspect. Indeed, social media feeds more often than not have some sort of geographic content, as they may communicate the location from where a particular report is contributed, the geolocation of an image, or they may refer to a specific sociocultural hotspot. By harvesting this geographic content from social media feeds we can transfer the extracted knowledge from the amorphous cyberspace to the geographic space, and gain a unique understanding of the human lansdscape, its structure and organization, and its evolution over time. This new-found opportunity signals the emergence of open-source geospatial intelligence, whereby social media contributions can be analyzed and mined to gain unparalleled situational awareness. In this paper we showcase a number of sample applications that highlight the capabilities of harvesting geospatial intelligence from social media feeds, focusing particularly on twitter as a representative data source.

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Index-Based Subgraph Matching Algorithm (ISMA): Fast Subgraph Enumeration in Large Networks Using Optimized Search Trees

Index-Based Subgraph Matching Algorithm (ISMA): Fast Subgraph Enumeration in Large Networks Using Optimized Search Trees | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.

Via Pierre Levy
luiy's insight:

Subgraph matching algorithms are designed to find all instances of predefined subgraphs in a large graph or network and play an important role in the discovery and analysis of so-called network motifs, subgraph patterns which occur more often than expected by chance. We present the index-based subgraph matching algorithm (ISMA), a novel tree-based algorithm. ISMA realizes a speedup compared to existing algorithms by carefully selecting the order in which the nodes of a query subgraph are investigated. In order to achieve this, we developed a number of data structures and maximally exploited symmetry characteristics of the subgraph. We compared ISMA to a naive recursive tree-based algorithm and to a number of well-known subgraph matching algorithms. Our algorithm outperforms the other algorithms, especially on large networks and with large query subgraphs. An implementation of ISMA in Java is freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/isma/.

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Pierre Levy's curator insight, April 22, 2013 1:53 PM

Subgraph matching algorithms are designed to find all instances of predefined subgraphs in a large graph or network and play an important role in the discovery and analysis of so-called network motifs, subgraph patterns which occur more often than expected by chance

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La Sociedad de la Ignorancia y otros ensayos.


Via A Petapouca, Pierre Levy
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betogomez's curator insight, June 12, 2013 4:54 AM

La Sociedad de la Ignorancia y otros ensayos. #Ebook 

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Wildcat: The otherness of the other is none other than me or you

Wildcat: The otherness of the other is none other than me or you | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

The point is this: The otherness of an ‘other’ is none other than you. Allow me a moment to explain, for it is no simple matter, to realize that otherness is fundamentally a complex trait-building, pattern making characteristic of our minds.


Via Wildcat2030
luiy's insight:

And as emergent semantic networks our minds define and redefine continuously in a hyper complex dynamic process that which we consider as meaningful. In the case we are talking about here the ‘meaningfulness’ resides with the concept of the ‘other’. In the conceptual scaffolding I am proposing to you here, the very term ‘other’ transforms to become an extension of that which is ‘me’, but even that transformation is only the first step into a greater motion still. The motion I refer to is the one in which the ‘other’ is not only an extension but forms a nucleic reality within your own self-description. In this case the nucleic form or image that the ‘other’ has become is no longer disassociated from the powers at play within your own mind but constitutes ipso-facto a strength of activity, dynamically interacting with the overall process of your own self description.

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Wildcat2030's curator insight, April 26, 2013 7:59 AM

My latest entry in the Ultrashorts Project

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Tooling Up for Digital Humanities

Tooling Up for Digital Humanities | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

This web site is designed to be a starting place, an entryway for scholars interested in beginning to explore the possibilities for digital tools, programs, and methods to empower and enhance their scholarship in the humanities. These essays and links are only a brief glimpse into the vast field of potential in the digital humanities, but we hope that they point outward to the field’s many possibilities.

 

Please join us for our accompanying weekly workshop series being offered at Stanford during the spring of 2011.

 

In the coming weeks, we will be adding essays about spatial analysis, databases, visualization, and pedagogy. We hope you will help us in this endeavor by commenting on and making suggestions for improvements in these introductory essays. Each essay, indeed each section of each essay has a place to leave comments and discuss a particular set of methods, tools and ideas. There is also a standalone discussion section at the end of the entire site for general discussion and comments about “Humanities 3.0″ – a self-consciously playful title suggesting the potential for new scholars to take up and use these tools in their work.

 

This web site is produced by Tooling Up for Digital Histories, a collaboration between theSpatial History Project and the Computer Graphics Lab at Stanford University and many others to compile, create, and share new tools for digital research in the humanities at Stanford and beyond. The collaboration has been funded by the Presidential Fund for Innovation in the Humanities at Stanford.

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E-tattoo monitors brainwaves and baby bump

E-tattoo monitors brainwaves and baby bump | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Foldable, stretchable electrode arrays that can non-invasively measure neural (EEG) signals without the need for gel (credit: Coleman lab, UCSD) In
luiy's insight:

In February, KurzweilAI introduced “temporary electronic tattoos,” which are foldable, stretchable electrode arrays that can non-invasively measure neural (EEG) signals. Now. researchers led by Todd Coleman at the University of California, San Diego, have now optimized the placement of the electrodes to pick up more complex brainwaves, New Scientist reports.

 

The researchers demonstrated this by monitoring P300 signals in the forebrain. These appear when you pay attention to a stimulus.

The team is now modifying the tattoo to transmit data wirelessly to a smartphone, Coleman says. Eventually, he hopes the device could identify other complex patterns of brain activity, such as those that might be used to control a prosthetic limb.

 

People with depression could wear the tattoo for an extended period, allowing it to help gauge whether medication is working. .It might also lend itself to pregnancy monitoring in developing countries. With help from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Coleman’s group is working on an unobtrusive version of the tattoo that monitors signals such as maternal contractions and fetal heart rate.

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Noam Chomsky on Where Artificial Intelligence Went Wrong

Noam Chomsky on Where Artificial Intelligence Went Wrong | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
An extended conversation with the legendary linguist

Via Dominique Cardon
luiy's insight:

If one were to rank a list of civilization's greatest and most elusive intellectual challenges, the problem of "decoding" ourselves -- understanding the inner workings of our minds and our brains, and how the architecture of these elements is encoded in our genome -- would surely be at the top. Yet the diverse fields that took on this challenge, from philosophy and psychology to computer science and neuroscience, have been fraught with disagreement about the right approach.

 

In 1956, the computer scientist John McCarthy coined the term "Artificial Intelligence" (AI) to describe the study of intelligence by implementing its essential features on a computer. Instantiating an intelligent system using man-made hardware, rather than our own "biological hardware" of cells and tissues, would show ultimate understanding, and have obvious practical applications in the creation of intelligent devices or even robots.

Some of McCarthy's colleagues in neighboring departments, however, were more interested in how intelligence is implemented in humans (and other animals) first. Noam Chomsky and others worked on what became cognitive science, a field aimed at uncovering the mental representations and rules that underlie our perceptual and cognitive abilities. Chomsky and his colleagues had to overthrow the then-dominant paradigm of behaviorism, championed by Harvard psychologist B.F. Skinner, where animal behavior was reduced to a simple set of associations between an action and its subsequent reward or punishment. The undoing of Skinner's grip on psychology is commonly marked by Chomsky's 1967 critical review of Skinner's book Verbal Behavior, a book in which Skinner attempted to explain linguistic ability using behaviorist principles.

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An Introduction to Social Media for Scientists @veletsianos

An Introduction to Social Media for Scientists @veletsianos | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
PLOS Biology is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal that features works of exceptional significance in all areas of biological science, from molecules to ecosystems, including works at the interface with other disciplines.

Via juandoming
luiy's insight:
Long-term Needs and Outlook

Social media and internet-based resources are increasingly ubiquitous. Thus, there is a pressing need for scientific institutions to offer formalized training opportunities for graduate students and tenured faculty alike to learn how to effectively use this new technology. Such training should address common misconceptions about social media platforms and help researchers identify an online repertoire that works best for their specific needs and goals. Organizations such as COMPASS (http://www.compassonline.org) can be called in to offer social media training workshops for scientists, and books such as Escape from the Ivory Tower [13] are succinct reference texts offering advice and guidance for interacting with a variety of media sources.

One barrier impacting tool adoption and training opportunities is the fact that online tools are commonly viewed as “uncharted territory.” The novelty of these resources often clouds our understanding of their measurable impacts and long-term utility, particularly in regards to research productivity and science communication/education efforts. In order to understand and refine online tools, appropriate and quantitative metrics are needed. Without high-quality data, it will be impossible to understand the true reach of these tools and discover the most effective uses of different platforms. The altmetrics movement (http://bit.ly/W3gRAD) has sprung up in response to this scenario, aiming to provide a means to measure the true impact of scientific research (social media discussion, journalistic coverage, etc.), as opposed to the perceived value of the venue (e.g., a journal) where research findings may be published. New tools for tracking a researcher's output include Google Scholar profiles (http://scholar.google.com), ImpactStory (http://impactstory.org), and the Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID) initiative (http://orcid.org). In addition, publishers such as PLOS are increasingly offering article-level metrics that log the number of article views, PDF downloads, social media discussions, and associated blog/media coverage.

Social media continues to evolve, grow, and undergo metamorphosis. The use of online tools and cutting-edge technology is growing among scientists, but their adoption and acceptance remains limited across the wider research community. In a 2011 study, only 2.5% of UK and US academics had established a Twitter account [14]. As the benefits become more apparent and dedicated metrics are developed to supplement scientists' portfolios, social media may soon become an integral part of the researcher's toolkit.

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Yucatán: Identidad y Cultura Maya - Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán

Yucatán: Identidad y Cultura Maya - Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
V.2.0. Desde una perspectiva académica a través de esta página, la Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán te ofrece un panorama de la realidad social y cultural del pueblo maya peninsular de ayer y hoy.
luiy's insight:

Diccionario Castellano - Maya.

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Corée du Sud : Une nation connectée

Corée du Sud : Une nation connectée | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
    Quelques statistiques sur internet en Corée du Sud La Corée du Sud est une des nations les plus présentes sur internet avec 82% de sa population qui est en ligne. En moyenne les coréens ac...

Via eRelations
luiy's insight:
L’avenir digital de la Corée du Sud

Selon toute vraisemblance, l’avenir digital de la Corée se jouera sur les téléphones et autres appareils mobiles. L’Asie-Pacifique détient plus de 50% des utilisateurs mondiaux de la téléphonie mobile et la Corée du Sud est à l’avant-scène de ce changement vers l’accès à internet sur les appareils intelligents. Ces derniers temps on assiste en Corée à une augmentation phénoménale et très rapide du marché des téléphones mobiles avec des marques maison comme LG, Samsung, etc., et des services personnalisables qui permettent l’accès en tout temps, de partout et à peu de frais à l’internet.

 

Le Canada devrait analyser l’évolution numérique incroyable qui a lieu en Corée et appliquer certains principes comme une implication concrète du gouvernement dans l’innovation digitale afin de mousser davantagel’innovation et la créativité technologique des entreprises d’ici. 

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Avatars and Theory

Avatars and Theory | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Guest post by Alan Sondheim. I started working with avatars in text-based applications such as newsgroups, email lists, MOOs, LPMUDs, and IRC.
luiy's insight:

I started working with avatars in text-based applications such as newsgroups, email lists, MOOs, LPMUDs, and IRC. Below is a list of what I perceived as their common characters – and the relationship of those characteristics to everyday, i.e. non-CMC, life. Current notes are in brackets.

JENNIFER, JULU, NIKUKO, ALAN

1 system resonances – what entrances and exits available – sendmail for example (from telnet 25 to configuration files), doctor for another [at this point text-based avatars were attached to applications that were not avatar-based. on the other hand the Eliza program in emacs allowed for the development of personality and dialog, and might be one of the first online avatar environments.]

 

2 explorations of self and fragmentations – discomforts, tremblings as totality is problematized [this tends towards issues of abjection, wounding, frisson, arousal, and death within the virtual - which might cynically be seen as nothing more than a rearrangement of digital bits.]

 

3 psychotic emanations – selves generating worlds, inability to return or manipulate one in relation to another [the worlds such as IRC were widely disparate and appeared autonomous; to carry Jennifer from one to another required reassertions. the same is true today, but mixed-reality work tends to blur all of this - in other wor(l)ds the environments exist in potential wells that allow tunneling.]

 

4 perturbations within systems – IRC or alt.jen-coolest for examples [it was, and still is, possible to perturb systems, to work at the edges of the game space, to hack and infiltrate - annihilating a performance platform at the end of a performance in Second Life, or having human performs work at the edges of a mocap space are two examples.]

 

5 theoretical turns – Jennifer’s ‘panties on the ground’ – desire in relation to metaphysical system building [sexual-theoretical turns, as both male and female avatars operated within fetishization and abjection, two trends that have become commonplace in virtual sexuality. what happens when an avatar is 'in tatters,' falling apart, collapsing?]

 

6 problematics of author and authoring – ‘deaths of authors’ [like the uncanny between real and virtual worlds, there is an uncanny between avatar creator/controller/human performer and avatar; through an analysis of projection and introjection, avatar and (presumably) human become inextricably entangled.]

 

7 multiculturalisms (Nikuko), sexualities (Julu), Alan and the rhetoric of innocence [multiculturalisms extend to virtual cultures and their ethnographies, but what occurs in the virtual doesn't stay in the virtual.]

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Facebook comme outil d’identification des tendances en matière d’obésité

Facebook comme outil d’identification des tendances en matière d’obésité | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Si Twitter permet d’identifier les formes de propagation de certaines pathologies, Facebook est quant à lui un espace et un outil qualifié pour identifier les tendances de développement de l’obésité.

Via Emmanuel Capitaine
luiy's insight:

Si Twitter permet d’identifier les formes de propagation de certaines pathologies, Facebook est quant à lui un espace et un outil qualifié pour identifier les tendances de développement de l’obésité. C’est le résultat auquel sont arrivés des chercheurs du Boston Children’s Hospital, en effectuant des analyses sur un volume conséquent de statuts et d’activités d’utilisateurs du réseau sociaul Facebook.

 

Les chercheurs ont en effet découvert l’existence d’une corrélation entre les publications des utilisateurs déclarant des activités sportives ou encore les Like de produits de sports, de bien-être, etc et le taux d’obésité dans une population définie. Ainsi, plus le taux de personnes publiant des statuts d’activités sportives est élevé, plus le taux d’obésité dans la région concernée est faible. Et plus le taux de personnes publiant des statuts liés à des shows TV ou des activités domestiques/sédentaires est élevé, plus le taux d’obésité dans cette région est important.

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Design & Social Context. Structural Visualisation

Design & Social Context. Structural Visualisation | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

This data visualisation was undertaken in order to better understand the structure and composition of the Higher Education (HE) segment of the College of Design and Social Context (DSC) at RMIT University.


One of RMIT's three colleges, DSC has a total HE EFTSL of around 11000, and a headcount over 14000 students. DSC's largest school by HE EFTSL is Media and Communications. Across all schools, undergraduate enrolments account for the greatest share of student load, and RTS/CGS (government subsidised) places the greatest proportion of fund sources. 210 programs are offered across the eight schools of DSC. Over 2000 courses sit across these programs (not illustrated). The centre captures articulation pathways between programs.

 

Coloured lines illustrate pathways within schools. Line width indicates the enrolment volume of the source program in each articulation pair. Grey lines capture existing and potential articulations across schools. Here, transparency indicates the EFTSL size of the source program. The chart captures a total of approximately 4700 articulation pathways. Note that individual program codes have been scrambled for the purposes of this public release.

 

Visualisation created using Processing 1.5.1, XlsReader 0.1.1.

Processing source: core, functions. Download rmit_dsc.zip for core.pde, functions.pde and the DSC_Radial.xls file required to run the visualisation from within Processing (note that program codes within the xls file have been altered prior to this public release).


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Reams of raw data are the tools of transparency

Reams of raw data are the tools of transparency | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

“Data” has become a buzzword in journalism in recent years, as technological advances have allowed for increased analysis, interpretation and presentation of the swathes of information now at our fingertips.

Data has always been part of the journalistic tool kit. But the volume and accessibility of data, combined with technological advances that help collect, analyse and clean data – as well as visualisation software, such as interactive maps – mean journalists, bloggers, web designers, statisticians and programmers are now able to analyse, contextualise and present data in new ways.


Via Irina Radchenko
luiy's insight:

Data journalism is increasingly part of the tool kit of ‘The Irish Times’. The Crime Statistics Ireland series last year saw us analyse recorded crime statistics for every Garda station in the country, using traditional journalism skills to give depth to the trends shown by the figures. What might otherwise have been just figures on a spreadsheet was brought to life by interactive tables that allowed irishtimes.com users to look at crime statistics from their local station.

 

Similarly, when the Government shut Garda stations earlier this year we were able to map the closures online, to help people visualise where the closures were taking place.

 

Data journalism also goes on behind the scenes; increasingly, stories that end up as words on a newspaper page begin their journey through the newsroom as numbers on a spreadsheet. It’s the job of our relatively new but growing team of data journalists to find the stories in the figures.

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Así es LiFi, la tecnología que ofrece 500 Mb por segundo y que jubilará al WiFi

Así es LiFi, la tecnología que ofrece 500 Mb por segundo y que jubilará al WiFi | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Quédense con este nombre: LiFi, acrónimo de Light Fidelity. El heredero natural de la tecnología WiFi promete dar mucho que hablar en los próximos años.


Via mezcal, Abel Revoredo
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Juanjo Pina's curator insight, April 26, 2013 3:13 AM

No sé yo... funciona... ¿cuando la luz está encendida? ¿?

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Neo4j Blog: Gmail Email analysis with Neo4j - and spreadsheets

Neo4j Blog: Gmail Email analysis with Neo4j - and spreadsheets | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

"In this blog post, we’ll take a look at how we can actually use Romain’s [Gmail Meter] output, and generate a neo4j database that will allow us to visually and graph-ically explore the email traffic in our gmail inboxes - without doing doing any coding of course"


Via Martin Hawksey
luiy's insight:

A bunch of different graphistas have pointed out to me in recent months that there is something funny about Graphs and email. Specifically, about graphs and email analysis. From my work in previous years at security companies, I know that Email Forensics is actually big business. Figuring out who emails whom, about what topics, with what frequency, at what times - is important. Especially when the proverbial sh*t hits the fan and fraud comes to light - like in the Enron case. How do I get insight into email traffic? How do I know what was communicated to who? And how do I get that insight, without spending a true fortune?

So a couple of days ago I came across an article or two that features Gmail Meter. This is of course not one of these powerful enterprise-ready forensics tools, but it is interesting. Written by Romain Vialard, it provides you with a really straightforward way to get all kinds of stats and data about your use of Gmail. It does so using a Google Apps Script, that is available to anyone using Google Docs’ spreadsheet functionality. In this blog post, we’ll take a look at how we can actually use Romain’s output, and generate a neo4j database that will allow us to visually and graph-ically explore the email traffic in our gmail inboxes - without doing doing any coding of course. Because I don’t know how to do that - but I do do spreadsheets, as you know by now.
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