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antropologiaNet, dataviz, collective intelligence, algorithms, social learning, social change, digital humanities
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Cells as living calculators -MIT engineers design cells that can compute logarithms, divide and take square roots. #logarithms

Cells as living calculators -MIT engineers design cells that can compute logarithms, divide and take square roots. #logarithms | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Using analog computation circuits, MIT engineers design cells that can compute logarithms, divide and take square roots.

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MIT engineers have transformed bacterial cells into living calculators that can compute logarithms, divide, and take square roots, using three or fewer genetic parts.

Inspired by how analog electronic circuits function, the researchers created synthetic computation circuits by combining existing genetic “parts,” or engineered genes, in novel ways.

The circuits perform those calculations in an analog fashion by exploiting natural biochemical functions that are already present in the cell rather than by reinventing them with digital logic, thus making them more efficient than the digital circuits pursued by most synthetic biologists, according to Rahul Sarpeshkar and Timothy Lu, the two senior authors on the paper, describing the circuits in the May 15 online edition of Nature.


Via Wildcat2030
luiy's insight:

Analog advantages 

Sarpeshkar has previously identified thermodynamic similarities between analog transistor circuits and the chemical circuits that take place inside cells. In 2011, he took advantage of those similarities to model biological interactions between DNA and proteins in an electronic circuit, using only eight transistors. 

In the new Nature paper, Sarpeshkar, Lu and colleagues have done the reverse — mapping analog electronic circuits onto cells. Sarpeshkar has long advocated analog computing as a more efficient alternative to digital computation at the moderate precision of computation seen in biology. These analog circuits are efficient because they can take in a continuous range of inputs, and they exploit the natural continuous computing functions that are already present in cells. In the case of cells, that continuous input might be the amount of glucose present. In transistors, it’s a range of continuous input currents or voltages.

Digital circuits, meanwhile, represent every value as zero or one, ignoring the range of possibilities in between. This can be useful for creating circuits that perform logic functions such as AND, NOT and OR inside cells, which many synthetic biologists have done. These circuits can reveal whether or not a threshold level of a certain molecule is present, but not the exact amount of it.

Digital circuits also require many more parts, which can drain the energy of the cell hosting them. “If you build too many parts to make some function, the cell is not going to have the energy to keep making those proteins,” Sarpeshkar says.

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aniamaclain's comment, May 16, 2013 5:21 AM
good invention
Rescooped by luiy from Social Network Analysis #sna
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A Social Network Analysis of Occupational Segregation #sna

Abstract: This paper proposes a simple social network model of occupational segregation


Via ukituki
luiy's insight:

We develop a social network model of occupational segregation between different social groups, generated by the existence of positive inbreeding bias among individuals from the same group. If network referrals are important in getting a job, then expected inbreeding bias in the
contact network structure induces different career choices for individuals
from different social groups. This further translates into stable occupational segregation equilibria in the labour market. We derive the conditions for persistent wage and unemployment inequality in the segregation
equilibria. Our framework is proposed as complementary to existing theories used to explain labour market inequalities between groups divided by race, ethnicity or gender.

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ukituki's curator insight, May 16, 2013 12:14 AM
This paper proposes a simple social network model of occupational segregation, generated by the existence of inbreeding bias among individuals of the same social group. If network referrals are important in getting a job, then expected inbreeding bias in the social structure results in different career choices for individuals from different social groups, which further translates into stable occupational segregation equilibria within the labour market. Our framework can be regarded as complementary to existing discrimination or rational bias theories used to explain persistent observed occupational disparities between various social groups.
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Graph Analysis Powers the Social and Semantic Spheres of Big Data - IBM - #SNA #dataviz

Graph Analysis Powers the Social and Semantic Spheres of Big Data - IBM - #SNA #dataviz | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Why predictive modeling of human behavior demands an end-to-end, low-latency database architecture

Via Tony Agresta
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Tony Agresta's curator insight, May 16, 2013 10:49 AM



Here are some key points from the article in addition to some insights about graph analysis and big data:

 

  • Semantic graphs map relationships among words, concepts and other constructs in the human language allowing for unstructured data to be used in a graph showing important connections.
  • Graph analysis is not new.   It has been used as a form of data visualization to explore connections and identify patterns and relationship that would otherwise have gone undetected.
  • Some vendors have taken their graph capabilities to new levels. For example, Centrifuge Systems allows users to draw the graphs, search the graph space, interact with charts and display important measures about the graph network.   Analysts can easily pinpoint portions of the graph that require additional analysis.  Hotspots of interesting activity jump out from the graph based on the number of connections and important performance measures.
  • While social graphs may be the most popular, this approach is especially useful in detecting fraud networks, cyber data breaches, terrorist activity and more. 
  • One of the most important points is that graphs can incorporate diverse streams of big data including both structured and unstructured.  Imagine the ability to analyze banking wire transfer data in the same graph with unstructured data that includes names, locations, and employers - intelligence that has been discovered through the semantic processing of unstructured data.   That's a powerful combination of sources linking data from the open web with transactional information. When done in real-time, this can be used in anti-money laundering, fraud prevention and homeland defense.
  • "Data scientists explicitly build semantic graph models as ontologies, taxonomies, thesauri, and topic maps using tools that implement standards such as the W3C-developed Resource Description Framework (RDF)."

 

While this may be beyond the scope of many NoSQL and Hadoop databases, MarkLogic 7 is embracing triple stores as they continue to innovate on their Enterprise NoSQL approach. No one else has values, triple store data derived from semantic processing and documents with real time indexing and search - The bar for Enterprise  NoSQL is about to be raised again.

 

You can read more about this on Semantic Web:

 

http://semanticweb.com/marklogic-7-vision-world-class-triple-store-and-world-beating-information-store_b37123








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Connected Learning: A Learning Approach Designed for Our Times

Connected Learning: A Learning Approach Designed for Our Times | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
What does connected learning look like in action? It looks like Charles Raben, a 14-year-old aspiring photographer from a public school in New York City.

Via Pierre Levy
luiy's insight:

Aprendizaje para todas las edades,,, hacia la "brecha" generacional.

 

Connected Learning: Production-centered and Openly networked

In the summer of 2011, Charles vacationed with his father in Berlin. The young photographer was captivated by the city's art galleries and young innovative culture; so much so that he decided to enroll in a weekly German class at New York University the following summer.

 

En route to his first class, Charles caught sight of an "interesting fellow" operating the Astor Place newsstand. They struck up an unlikely conversation that deeply impacted Charles.

 

Jerry had been running his Astor Place newsstand for the past 25 years. The city of New York had recently stepped in, threatening to take away his license, based on a technicality.

 

Overcome by the man's plea for help, Charles rushed home and hopped on change.org. He'd signed petitions in the past in support of gay rights, wrongly charged criminals and the protection of wildlife. But he had never created one of his own.

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The Art of Data Visualization: How to Tell Complex Stories Through Smart Design

The Art of Data Visualization: How to Tell Complex Stories Through Smart Design | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
The volume of data in our age is so vast that whole new research fields have blossomed to develop better and more efficient ways of presenting and organizing information.
luiy's insight:

The volume of data in our age is so vast that whole new research fields have blossomed to develop better and more efficient ways of presenting and organizing information. One such field is data visualization, which can be translated in plain English as visual representations of information.


The PBS “Off Book” series turned its attention to data visualization in a short video featuring Edward Tufte, a statistician and professor emeritus at Yale, along with three young designers on the frontiers of data visualization. Titled “The Art of Data Visualization,” the video does a good job of demonstrating how good design—from scientific visualization to pop infographics—is more important than ever.

 

In much the same way that Marshall McLuhan spoke about principles of communication, Tufte talks in the video about what makes for elegant and effective design. One of his main points: Look after truth and goodness, and beauty will look after herself.

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#SNA : Google+ Ripples show influence and how posts are shared

#SNA : Google+ Ripples show influence and how posts are shared | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

Posts and links get shared over and over again, but we usually don't know how. We get counts, but who shares what and how far do does a link reach? Google+ Ripples gives you a peak into the process. A link or status is posted, and like when a pebble is dropped in a pond, a pattern forms outwards.

 

The above, for example, is the view for Sergey Brin's update when Steve Jobs passed away. Each circle represents a share, and arrows indicate the direction of a share. Larger circles indicate heavier resharing.

 
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Social relevance, algorithms and choice.-Relevance engines are intended to maximise engagement

Social relevance, algorithms and choice.-Relevance engines are intended to maximise engagement | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Should social networks filter our streams for us? Are relevance algorithms the way forward or closed loops leading to insular networks?

Via Wildcat2030
luiy's insight:
Control

One of the most controversial and divisive aspects of Facebook is Edgerank – the algorithm used to decide what gets displayed in our news feeds based on the relationships and interactions with our friends. Essentially, our actions are analysed and we are shown more of what we “like”.

Social networks such as Facebook and Google+ are cultures of affirmation where we only have the option to Like or +1, while this is intended to create a positive atmosphere but it risks creating a closed loop where our feeds becoming more insular and focused.

When conditions exist such that we have multiple levels of relevance management do we need the social stream to be further filtered for us?

In response to user queries over strange stream behaviour, Google has confirmed that it is testing a relevance algorithm and “experimenting with ways of bringing the most relevant posts to the top.”

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Paper : CHARACTERIZING USER BEHAVIOR AND INFORMATION PROPAGATION ON A SOCIAL MULTIMEDIA NETWORK

An increasing portion of modern socializing takes place via online social networks. Members of these communities often play distinct roles that can be deduced from observations of users’ online activities. One such activity is the sharing of multimedia, the popularity of which can vary dramatically. Here we discuss our initial analysis of anonymized, scraped data from consenting Facebook users, together with associated demographic and psychological profiles. We present five clusters of users with common observed online behaviors, where these users also show correlated profile characteristics. Finally, we identify some common properties of the most popular multimedia content.

 

To read the rest, you can download a FREE pdf copy from http://goo.gl/1JPk8

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Visualizing How A Bitcoin Transaction Works | Zero Hedge

Visualizing How A Bitcoin Transaction Works | Zero Hedge | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Following our last primer on the digital currency, prices have somewhat stabilized (despite the ongoing efforts of TPTB to regulate it out of existence).

Via Ilona Buchem
luiy's insight:

Following our last primer on the digital currency, prices have somewhat stabilized (despite the ongoing efforts of TPTB to regulate it out of existence). The following infographic provides a step-by-step illustration of how a bitcoin transaction occurs.

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Web Curation And New Professions: The Content Curator

Web Curation And New Professions: The Content Curator | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Excerpted from article on Mashable:
"Today, however, curation encompasses a whole new catalog of professions, brands and tools — and most revolve around the web.

A curator ingests, analyzes and contextualizes web content and information of a particular nature onto a platform or into a format we can understand. In other words, a curator is like that person at the beach with the metal detector, surfacing items and relics of perceived value. Only, a web curator shares those gems of content with their online audiences.

Some believe "curator" to be a reappropriated, throwaway term, one that simply elevates marginally focused web users.

Some media sites choose to curate articles already published and reported by other sites. For instance, Boing Boing and The Awl feed links that reference news reported by other sites around the web, tailoring content that will resonate with their readership.

More and more people are taking the reins into their own hands. Consumer curators are flocking to sites like The Fancy to browse products and silo them into categories. Other curation tools aren't as consumer-driven but nonetheless help users organize and structure web content that matters to them.

As much as the term gets criticized, curation requires patience, resourcefulness and a keen editing eye. It means becoming fluent in one particular dialect of the web, versus trying to speak its entire language. It's the reason journalists have beats, and the reason you chose one major in college, instead of seven.
Perhaps the best part? Curation is a never-ending job, and it never gets boring..."

Read full original article:
http://mashable.com/2013/05/09/curator/

 


Via Giuseppe Mauriello, Gilles Jourquin
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Víctor V. Valera Jiménez's curator insight, May 10, 2013 10:51 PM

Excelente artículo en Mashable de Stephanie Buck que nos habla de este nuevo perfil profesional que está irrumpiendo con fuerza en el marketing de contenidos, el Content Curator.

Emily at Two Pens's curator insight, May 29, 2013 10:39 PM

Love this. Debunked and clarified.

John Thomas's curator insight, February 12, 2014 2:28 PM
Web Curation And New Professions: The Content Curator
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Social Explorer : The easy-to-use web interface lets users create maps and reports

Social Explorer :  The easy-to-use web interface lets users create maps and reports | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Social Explorer provides easy access to demographic information about the United States. We provide thousands of interactive data maps going back to 1790.
luiy's insight:

Social Explorer is an online research tool designed to provide quick and easy access to current and historical census data and demographic information. The easy-to-use web interface lets users create maps and reports to better illustrate, analyze and understand demography and social change. In addition to being a comprehensive data resource, Social Explorer also offers features and tools to meet the needs of both demography experts and novices. From research libraries to classrooms to the front page of the New York Times, Social Explorer is helping people engage with society and science.

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'Geography of Hate' maps racism and homophobia on Twitter

'Geography of Hate' maps racism and homophobia on Twitter | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Twitter, even more than many other social media tools, can feel disconnected from the real world. But a group of students and professors at research site Floating Sheep have built a comprehensive...
luiy's insight:

Twitter, even more than many other social media tools, can feel disconnected from the real world. But a group of students and professors at research site Floating Sheep have built a comprehensive map of some of Twitter's most distasteful content: the racist, homophobic, or ableist slurs that can proliferate online. Called Geography of Hate, the interactive map charts ten relatively common slurs across the continental US, either by general category or individually. Looking at the whole country, you'll often see a mass of red or what the map's creators call a "blue smog of hate." Zooming in, however, patches appear over individual regions or cities; some may be predictable, while others are not.

 

The map builds on an earlier Floating Sheep project that showed where President Obama was referenced with racial slurs, but it's far more comprehensive and well-constructed. Unlike many other studies, for example, the tweets weren't collected and analyzed algorithmically — a method that could accidentally collect non-derogatory uses of these terms. Instead, the team first searched through a year's worth of geotagged tweets for words, then had a group of students at Humboldt State University look at each one. Only tweets they found explicitly negative went on the map: a derogatory use of the word "dyke" would be added, for example, but one reclaiming the term for a gay pride parade would not. In total, the map charts about 150,000 negative, slur-filled tweets.

 

Since the map looks at only geotagged tweets, it's not a pure representation of Twitter, but this is standard practice for such mapping. Hateful tweets are weighted by the total number of tweets in an area, so you'll see the proportional number of slurs, not just areas with the largest number of Twitter users. Floating Sheep has much more information about the methodology, as well as some interesting analysis of the results.

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Big Data : nouvelle étape de l’informatisation du monde « InternetActu.net #algorithmes #bigdata

Big Data : nouvelle étape de l’informatisation du monde « InternetActu.net #algorithmes #bigdata | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
InternetActu.net est un site d'actualité consacré aux enjeux de l'internet, aux usages innovants qu'il permet et aux recherches qui en découlent.

Via Dominique Cardon
luiy's insight:

Pour les auteurs, les Big Data créent une intelligence artificielle qu’aucun humain ne peut comprendre. Mais plus encore, à les lire, résonne les propos de Lawrence Lessig, sur le code fait loi, qui nous expliquait que c’était le code qui régulait le cyberespace. Et qui nous disait aussi qu’à mesure que le code change, la nature du cyberespace change. Et c’est bien ce qui est à l’oeuvre avec les Big Data. Si jusqu’à présent nous pouvions, la plupart du temps, accéder au code source et donc mesurer ce qui était pris en compte, c’est de moins en moins le cas, et cela risque de le devenir toujours moins avec les Big Data.

 

“Quand les ordinateurs ont été explicitement programmés pour suivre des ensembles d’instructions, comme avec les premiers programmes de traduction d’IBM permettant de passer du russe à l’anglais en 1954, un humain pouvait facilement comprendre pourquoi le logiciel substituait un mot par un autre. Mais Google Translate intègre lui des milliards de pages de traductions pour prendre ses décisions quant à savoir si le mot anglais light doit être traduit par lumière ou léger. Il est impossible pour un humain de trouver les raisons précises de choix du mot dans le programme, car ce choix est basé sur des quantités massives de données et de vastes calculs statistiques.”

 

A l’heure des algorithmes, des APIs et des Big Data (c’est-à-dire des traitements, des croisements et des vastes ensembles de données), le code, qui était le fondement d’internet, se complexifie. Il n’est plus la loi, comme nous l’avait appris Lawrence Lessig. Il ne se régule plus par la transparence. On ne peut plus regarder le code source de Google Translate pour en comprendre le fonctionnement. Et c’est d’autant plus vrai à mesure que les données, les croisements et les traitements se démultiplient, se complexifient et s’imbriquent. Et l’une des conséquences est bien le changement de l’internet tel que nous le connaissions.

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Dossier : La #télémédecine, un futur proche pour les sociétés d’assistance | #telepresence

Dossier : La #télémédecine, un futur proche pour les sociétés d’assistance | #telepresence | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Dossier : La télémédecine, un futur proche pour les sociétés d’assistance http://t.co/YMphgSUkxz #assurance

Via Emmanuel Capitaine
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designplaygrounds.com » Archive » Erosion Series by Tamsin Van Essen #design

designplaygrounds.com » Archive » Erosion Series by Tamsin Van Essen #design | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via Alessio Erioli
luiy's insight:

Erosion Series by Tamsin Van Essen explores erosion and the disruption of form. Focusing on biological erosion,Tamsin´s intention in this work is to convey the idea of a host being attacked and eaten away by a parasitic virus, highlighting the creeping spread of the infection as it corrupts the body. Erosion is a series of angular porcelain forms, sandblasted to wear the surface and reveal inner strata.

 

This aggressive process, contrarily, creates a delicate vulnerability in the shape. The translucency of the porcelain and the interruption of the surface make it possible to glimpse through to layers beneath, creating a tension between the seen and the obscured.

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How Google Is Fighting Sex Trafficking With Big Data. #cybercrime

How Google Is Fighting Sex Trafficking With Big Data. #cybercrime | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
For years human traffickers have used the latest technology to profit from the slave trade but now software engineers at big data companies like...
luiy's insight:

And this year the Global Impact Award went to anti-trafficking organizations Polaris Project, LaStrada International, and Liberty Asia due to their burgeoning work with using big data to build an interconnected grid of modern-day tools to fight human trafficking.

 

“Trafficking isn’t a very static or a very monolithic thing. There are uses of technology that traffickers are using that we haven’t even learned yet. It’s very fluid and the folks working on trafficking need to be as nimble as the traffickers are in our ability to innovate, in our ability to leverage new technologies to make our work more effective,” says Bradley Myles, CEO of Polaris Project, one of the recipients of the grant.

 

Myles tells me that traffickers use technology like everyone else does--to make their lives easier. They use social media to recruit victims, they use mobile devices with built-in GPS to track women under their control, so they always know where they are and if they are servicing clients, and they even use Internet groups as a marketplace to buy and sell women and forced laborers.

 

Traffickers also use technology to get online customers via porn sites--even if those customers don’t know that the women they’re watching are being held against their will. “There are webcam sites that exist where traffickers force women to be involved in live online shows. Traffickers are forcing women and girls to strip and do sex acts over webcams for sex buyers that are in another country but are interacting with the women nonetheless,” Myles says.

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RUN: Open innovation and social network analysis. #SNA #dataviz

RUN: Open innovation and social network analysis. #SNA #dataviz | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

In this work we propose the use of Social Network Analysis to understand the positioning of the concept of Open Innovation in the literature, offering thereby a complementary approach to existing literature review up to now. The main motivation of this network analysis is to contribute to the understanding of the concept of Open Innovation, with its spread to different areas of knowledge over the years and its relationship with other concepts in the literature. Some 403 articles published in the database of the Science Direct during the years 2003 to 2011 were analyzed. The data was collected separately by year, considering the following information: journals in which the articles were published; countries of origin of the articles’ authors, keywords of these articles and year of publication. The results reveal the intense growth of the use of the words "Open Innovation" in articles from different areas of knowledge, as well as its increasing interconnection with other concepts, allowing the understanding of its diffusion in the literature.

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Social network analysis, predictive coding enlisted to fight fraud -- GCN

Social network analysis, predictive coding enlisted to fight fraud -- GCN | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
New analytic technologies will help agencies and investigators look deeper into behavioral patterns to combat some of the more sophisticated fraud schemes on the horizon.
luiy's insight:
NEW TOOLS FOR COMBATING FRAUD

Analytics/Predictive Modeling: Transactional fraud requires analytic technology to search other data repositories to identify validity of invoices and claims, services rendered and equipment delivery.

 

Data Fusion: Matching claims or billing data with information housed in other systems to identify suspicious activity.

 

Data Visualization: Visualization tools such as dashboards and modeling can help highlight instances and root causes of improper payments.

 

Social Network Analysis: Adds another avenue for detecting fraud rings and prior activities of suspected perpetrators.

 

Devices: Rising use of geo-spatial, mobile PCs, tablets, and smart devices with real-time data entry is being seen in programs and systems for tobacco tax, fleet management, and field inspection.

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Tracks by @ValdisKrebs : The tracks you leave behind on the Networks

Tracks by @ValdisKrebs : The tracks you leave behind on the Networks | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

The tracks you leave behind on the Networks

luiy's insight:

Valdis Krebs

 

...created a magazine on Flipboard. "Tracks" is available with thousands of other magazines and all the news you care about. Download Flipboard for free and search for "Valdis Krebs."

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Birds of a Feather Tweet Together: Integrating Network and Content Analyses to Examine Cross-Ideology Exposure on Twitter - Himelboim - 2013

Birds of a Feather Tweet Together: Integrating Network and Content Analyses to Examine Cross-Ideology Exposure on Twitter - Himelboim - 2013 | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:
Conclusions

Social networking sites and social media in general are becoming popular venues for political talk and interaction for individuals (Pew, 2009) and politicians (Williams & Gulati, 2007). Political talk on Twitter does not occur in a strictly political environment, and individuals create social ties based on a wide range of interests, not only based on political opinions. Political content, nonetheless, was overall confined to like-minded clusters of users. On Twitter, individuals may interact with others who do not share their political ideology. But, at least for the issues analyzed for this study, this potential does not lead to meaningful cross-ideological interaction.

Notes

Paper accepted for publication in Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

Itai Himelboim is assistant professor and Stephen McCreery is a graduate student, both in the Department of Telecommunications at the University of Georgia at Athens. Marc Smith is a research sociologist at Connected Action Consulting Group.

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The Geography of a Tweet A team of researchers...

The Geography of a Tweet A team of researchers... | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

A team of researchers lead by GDELT co-creator Kalev Leetaru gained access to the Twitter decahose last October and November and examined 1.5 billion tweets from 71 million users.

Among the many things they parsed from the two terabytes of data was the average physical distance between an original tweet its retweet: Some 749 miles (1205 km).

For @ mentions, the average distance between one user referencing another when exact geolocation is known is 744 miles (1197 km).

The paper, Mapping the Global Twitter Heartbeat: The Geography of Twitter, also includes the geographic difference between mainstream news media and news items from Twitter:

Mainstream media appears to have significantly less coverage of Latin America and vastly better greater of Africa. It also covers China and Iran much more strongly, given their bans on Twitter, as well as having enhanced coverage of India and the Western half of the United States. Overall, mainstream media appears to have more even coverage, with less clustering around major cities.

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Facebook Is About To Launch A Huge Play In 'Big Data' Analytics

Facebook Is About To Launch A Huge Play In 'Big Data' Analytics | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Here are Facebook's Big Data moves in Q1:

Launched new advertising products such as Lookalike Audiences, Managed Custom Audiences, and Partner Categories, which help marketers improve their targeting capabilities on Facebook.Partnered with Datalogix, Epsilon, Acxiom, and BlueKai to enable marketers to incorporate off Facebook purchasing data in order to deliver more relevant ads to users.Enhanced ability to measure advertiser ROI on digital media across the internet through our acquisition of the Atlas Advertising Suite.

The first two points underplay what Facebook is up to. Most people have no idea what Datalogix, Epsilon, Acxiom and Bluekai actually do. Insiders, however, know that Facebook alliances with these companies give it one of the most powerful consumer databases on the planet.

 

Epsilon has data on 300 million company loyalty card members worldwide, and a databank on 250 million consumers in the U.S.Acxiom has "a comprehensive national database covering more than 126 million households and 190 million individuals."Datalogix says, "Our database contains more than $1 trillion in offline purchase-based data and we’re able to covert this data, and any CRM data, into an online universe."Bluekai is a data management platform — marketers bring their own data to those companies, and Bluekai will crunch it and turn it into a strategy for making marketing more effective.

 


Via Rob Kitchin, Conor McGarrigle
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The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
E-readers and tablets are becoming more popular as such technologies improve, but research suggests that reading on paper still boasts unique advantages

Via RitaZ, NikolaosKourakos, Jim Lerman, Mary Reilley Clark, Andrea Naranjo
luiy's insight:

But why, one could ask, are we working so hard to make reading with new technologies like tablets and e-readers so similar to the experience of reading on the very ancient technology that is paper? Why not keep paper and evolve screen-based reading into something else entirely? Screens obviously offer readers experiences that paper cannot. Scrolling may not be the ideal way to navigate a text as long and dense as Moby Dick, but the New York Times, Washington Post, ESPN and other media outlets have created beautiful, highly visual articles that depend entirely on scrolling and could not appear in print in the same way. Some Web comics andinfographics turn scrolling into a strength rather than a weakness. Similarly, Robin Sloan has pioneered the tap essay for mobile devices. The immensely popular interactive Scale of the Universe tool could not have been made on paper in any practical way. New e-publishing companies like Atavist offer tablet readers long-form journalism with embedded interactive graphics, maps, timelines, animations and sound tracks. And some writers are pairing up with computer programmers to produce ever more sophisticated interactive fiction and nonfiction in which one's choices determine what one reads, hears and sees next.

When it comes to intensively reading long pieces of plain text, paper and ink may still have the advantage. But text is not the only way to read.

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RitaZ's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:00 AM
Teachers need to find a way to take advantage of the different modes of reading for different purposes in order to reap the benefits of each (and to teach our students to do so). Thanks, Adele! 
Ken Morrison's curator insight, May 12, 2013 3:12 PM

This article does a great job and helping us realize the real and perceived reasons why people feel that reading on paper is more benefitial for them. At this point in history, people do tend to remember more if they read from paper.  We can often remember which region of a page we learned something even if we read it several weeks ago.  We like the transition of one side of the book being heavier than the other as we progress through the pages.  Book designers take great efforts to design how books look, feel and smell.  Digital books are disrupting our experience and interaction with the written text.  Many people are in a mental state before reading a printed text that it is more serious and meaningful.  This mindset may be changing how we engage the brain and thus how much we remember.

 

 

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Digital Humanities but No Digital Sociology

Digital Humanities but No Digital Sociology | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
All these changes in scholarship have been taken up with a great deal more enthusiasm by some in the academy than others.  Our colleagues in the humanities have embraced digital technologies much m...
luiy's insight:

Sociology lags far behind in the adoption of digital tools for scholarly work.  As Paul DiMaggio and colleagues noted in 2001, “sociologists have been slow to take up the study of the Internet” (“The Social Implications of the Internet,” Annual Review of Sociology, 2001, p.1). While there are notable exceptions, such as Andrew Beveridge’s digitizing of Census maps (www.socialexplorer.com), when looking at the field as a whole these sorts of innovations are rare in sociology. In contrast to the decade-long conference in the digital humanities, there is no annual conference on “digital sociology.”  Sociology graduate students Nathan Jurgensen and PJ Rey recently organized a conference on “Theorizing the Web,” that drew luminaries in sociology Saskia Sassen and George Ritzer, but this is the first sociology conference (that we are aware of) to focus exclusively on understanding the digital era from a sociological perspective.  Analogously, there is no large institution, like the NEH seeking to fund digitally informed sociological research. The reasons for this sociological lag when it comes to the Internet are still not clear, but some point to the problems of getting digital publication projects recognized by tenure and promotion review committees.

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