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antropologiaNet, dataviz, collective intelligence, algorithms, social learning, social change, digital humanities
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A Thousand Milieus : recommendations systems | #MAS

A Thousand Milieus : recommendations systems | #MAS | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Berlin based designer and programmer Christopher Warnow had a closer look at the interest graph between people reading the same books.

Via Alessio Erioli
luiy's insight:

Christopher Warnow developed an application that loads recommendations for a given book on Amzon.com and converts visualizes the information as a network. Soon, milieus of interest emerge showing related topics and additional literature.

 

The application is written in Processing leveraging the power of the open source graph visualization library Gephi Toolkit. You can download the tool and read more information on Christopher’s website.

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Understanding the structures, antecedents and outcomes of organisational learning and knowledge transfer: a multi-theoretical and multilevel network analysis | #KM

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Abstract:Thegoalofthisstudywastodevelopamulti-theoreticalandmultilevel
model to study organisational learning and knowledge transfer. We employed a social network approach to theorise and empirically test the structures, antecedents and outcomes of intra-organisational information retrieval and allocation. Data were collected from 110 individuals across nine work teams, and analysed using Exponential Random Graph Modelling (ERGM) technique. The results found a multiplexity and reciprocity of team members’ information retrieval and allocation, as well as a predominant centralised structure of information retrieval. Furthermore, there was a tendency for members to retrieve and allocate information across job positions. Finally, members were more satisfied with their team work when proactively retrieving information from others than when receiving unsolicited information allocated from others. This study has important theoretical and practical implications for understanding and managing organisational knowledge and learning networks.

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Who dares to dodge Google's information tax? | McKenzie Wark

Who dares to dodge Google's information tax? | McKenzie Wark | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

There used to be all sorts of criticisms of the old "culture industries" like Hollywood and the top 40, which entertained us with stories or songs that always ended on an upbeat note, no matter how false. But at least the culture industries went to the bother of entertaining us. Their replacements don't even bother. They expect us to entertain each other, and pay a tax for it. Facebook or Google's YouTube are not the culture industries so much as the vulture industries, taking an information surcharge from us while we amuse each other, and selling us to advertisers. Like do-it-yourself commercial TV.

 

These are all elements of what I call the "spectacle of disintegration". The old spectacle of television and radio papered the world with images of what the lovely soul of the commodity was supposed to look like. We were at least still free to daydream while we sat idly watching.

 

But in the spectacle of disintegration, all that breaks apart. The big screen decays into so many little screens. Our leisure time is now to be spent producing information for the vulture industries of Google and co, in an unequal exchange of information. In exchange for the poll tax of personal data, we get to watch each other's cat videos, while Google becomes some new version of the state, presiding over all our bitty lives, master of all our data, in aggregate.

 

Like any state, Google has its patriots. But there are also those who think this latest version of the spectacle offers some quirky avenues for having fun at its expense. Its time for a certain opacity, a certain glamour of obscurity. Not all the information we offer up has to be even remotely true.

It's 45 years since the failure of May '68, that last attempt to rock the old kind of state. Afterwards the Situationists, who gave us the concept of the spectacle, disbanded. But they did not go silent. They pioneered ways of discreetly carving out spaces where other codes apply, protected by cryptic passwords. Perhaps some of their subtle arts might work within the belly of this new digital beast, so that we might live within it, but not give it our undivided attention.

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The Experimental Man at #Big Data in #Biomedicine. #health

The Experimental Man at #Big Data in #Biomedicine. #health | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

At this week’s Big Data in Biomedicine conference, David Ewing Duncan, author of Experimental Man, delivered a keynote speech titled “You as Data: Can Big Data Predict Your Future Health?”

 

Using himself as a guinea pig to explore the new age of personalized health, Duncan has collected close to 30,000 genetic traits about himself through numerous medical tests and scans and noted, “If everyone on the planet had this much data collected, you’d be in something called yottabytes”

 

In his talk, Duncan revealed what he’s learned from this tremendous reservoir of personal health data and discussed promising biomedical technologies and research that may boost longevity and lead to radical life extension. He urged attendees to contemplate how long they wanted to live - giving them the choice of 80 years, 120 years, 150 years or forever -and the implications of living that long.

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Big data at work: 12 stories about reinvention #bigdata #Insurance #Healthcare

Big data at work: 12 stories about reinvention #bigdata #Insurance #Healthcare | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Big data is cool and all, but is it really changing the way companies function? Yes. Here are 10 stories that show that transformation.
luiy's insight:

Big data has become something of a buzzword. Everybody talks about it, but its impact can be elusive. How is big data really changing the way companies and other organizations function? These 12 stories highlight that transformation: from helping health insurers keep better tabs on patients, to changing how cars are made, to easing traffic congestion on busy freeways. These case studies show big data at work.


1. Healthcare

2. Cars

3. Presidential campaigns

4. Highway traffic

5. Pro basketball

6. Music

7. Social networking

8. Insurance

9. Television

10. Social change

11. Prescription drugs

12. Email

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Global Outlook::Digital Humanities: Global Digital Humanities Essay Prize

Global Outlook::Digital Humanities: Global Digital Humanities Essay Prize | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Global Outlook :: Digital Humanities (GO::DH) is pleased to announce the first Global Digital Humanities Essay competition. Topic: This competition is for research papers looking at some aspect of ...
luiy's insight:
Topic:

This competition is for research papers looking at some aspect of the national, regional, or international practice of the Digital Humanities. Within this broad subject, participants may choose their own approach: focussing in individual problems or projects (e.g. some specific scholarly, preservation, or cultural heritage issue), or broader philosophical, geographical, sociological, political, or other discussion of the practice of Digital Humanities in a global context.

Prizes:

Up to four awards of $500 (CAN) each plus an opportunity for fast-track publication inDigital Studies/Le champ numérique. Additional awards, including fast-track publication, may be available for runners up and honorary mentions.

Eligibility:

The competition is open to any interested party including students, graduate students, junior faculty, and researchers unaffiliated with a university or research institution. Only one submission is permitted per person.

Language:

Submissions may be in any language. The adjudication committee will attempt to find readers for languages that lie outside its own experience (A list of members of the adjudication committee and the languages they read is found below). Digital Studies/Le champ numérique publishes in English or French. Winning contributions in languages other than French or English will be published in their original language with a translation into either English or French.

Adjudication criteria:

The committee will adjudicate essays based on their interest and topicality, the quality and breadth of their research, and the quality of analysis and data. In each case these criteria will be considered in relation to the chosen topic. The committee is also committed to ensuring a diversity of voices and experiences in represented in the competition and among the finalists.

Submission process:

June 30, 2013: Deadline for initial submission. Submissions may take the form of extended abstracts (500-1000 words) or complete drafts (recommended length: 6,000-15,000 words). Winning entries in this round will receive an interim award of $200.

October 30, 2013: Deadline for final submission. Winners from the initial round will be invited to submit their completed papers by October 30, 2013 for review, copy-editing, and submission to Digital Studies/Le champ numérique. Upon successful completion of the review process, the winning contestants will receive a completion bonus of $300.

Send your submissions to prizes@globaloutlookdh.org. Preferred formats are PDF, HTML, Plain Text, Word, Open Office, or LaTeX.

 
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App anti-monsanto : Una nueva aplicación 'boicotea' a Monsanto y comprueba el origen de productos. #antimonsanto

App anti-monsanto : Una nueva aplicación 'boicotea' a Monsanto y comprueba el origen de productos. #antimonsanto | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Una nueva aplicación desarrollada por un joven estadounidense permite a los consumidores comprar productos de empresas cuyos principios comparten, así como tomar parte en campañas a favor o en contra de ciertas ideas.
luiy's insight:

Una nueva aplicación desarrollada por un joven estadounidense permite a los consumidores comprar productos de empresas cuyos principios comparten, así como tomar parte en campañas a favor o en contra de ciertas ideas.

Ivan Pardo, un estadounidense de 26 años de edad de Los Angeles, tardó unos 16 meses en crear una aplicación que lleva el nombre de Buycott. Su funcionamiento consta de dos partes. Una vez descargada la aplicación, los usuarios pueden buscar los grupos disponibles que abogan por apoyar o boicotear varias iniciativas y unirse a ellos.   

Una de las campañas más populares es la que se denomina 'Diga 'no' a Monsanto', que incluye a unos 10.000 usuarios que se oponen a la empresa biotecnológica que produce alimentos genéticamente modificados. Unas 29.000 personas también se unieron al grupo 'Exija la etiquetación de los OGM'. 

Las campañas se dividen por temas: la educación, el medio ambiente, la justicia económica, la responsabilidad social o los derechos de los inmigrantes, entre otros. Por el momento, la aplicación cuenta con más de 100 campañas y la lista sigue aumentando. Pardo insta a la gente a crear campañas si existe alguna causa que ellos quieren ver en la aplicación. 

El segundo servicio que ofrece la aplicación es escanear y analizar el código de barras de productos e identificar su marca y la empresa productora. Después, la aplicación comprueba si estas actúan contra la filosofía de las campañas que el usuario seleccionó.



Texto completo en: http://actualidad.rt.com/actualidad/view/94880-aplicacion-boicotear-monsanto-gmo-eeuu

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The collective Intelligence Genome. #CI #collab

luiy's insight:

Questions for drive CI "genome" design:

 

What is being done? ----- Goal

Who is doing it? ---------- Staffing

Why are they doing it? --- Incentives

How is being done? ------ Structure/Process

 

Exemples about CI design : Linux (hierarchy) and wikipedia (crowd).

 

- Collaboration "gene", Crowd (multitud) "gene".

 

- Handbook of CI. 100 exemples about CI.

 

- Differences and similarities onto CI models : "Threadless" and "InnoCentive".

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Collective intelligence and the “genetic” structure of groups. MIT

Collective intelligence and the “genetic” structure of groups. MIT | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Do groups have genetic structures? If so, can they be modified?

Those are two central questions for Thomas Malone, a professor of management and an expert in organizational structure and group intelligence at MIT’sSloan School of Management. In a talk this week at IBM’s Center for Social Software, Malone explained the insights he’s gained through his research and as the director of the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence, which he launched in 2006 in part to determine how collective intelligence might be harnessed to tackle problems — climate change, poverty, crime — that are generally too complex to be solved by any one expert or group. In his talk, Malone discussed the “genetic” makeup of collective intelligence, teasing out the design differences between, as he put it, “individuals, collectively, and a collective of individuals.”

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We're All Connected | The Scientist Magazine®. #SNA

We're All Connected | The Scientist Magazine®. #SNA | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
A look at some of biology’s communication networks
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Those same electrons that kept New York Telephone customers connected also work to facilitate energy transfer between bacteria. In “Live Wires” Mohamed El-Naggar and Steven Finkel recount the birth and development of electromicrobiology, a fascinating new field of research that explores the transmission of electrical signals between microbes. The authors describe how electrons move not only along thin hairs called pili that project from the cell bodies of certain bacteria, but also in the shared periplasmic space of long chains of thousands of linked bacteria, and from the membranes of several bacterial species to extracellular mineral surfaces. “This vision of integrated microbial circuits was unimaginable 10 years ago,” the authors conclude. “But as we unravel the molecular and biophysical basis of long-distance electron transport, these bacteria may one day become essential components of everyday technologies.”

Yes, we are all connected—and always have been, long before we could phone a friend, eavesdrop on microbial and molecular crosstalk, or begin to know how to strengthen and secure our most precious natural bonds. 

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Visual Business Intelligence - From Giant Hairballs to Clear Patterns in Networks. #SNA

Visual Business Intelligence - From Giant Hairballs to Clear Patterns in Networks. #SNA | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via ukituki
luiy's insight:

The usefulness of understanding relationships within networks is becoming more apparent, so it is fortunate that our ability to explore and analyze networks by visualizing them is improving. Common examples of networks that analysts examine include connections between terrorists or connections between linked sites on the World Wide Web. While these networks in particular get a great deal of attention today, other more run-of-the-mill networks can be explored more insightfully as well, such as the connections between products that are often purchased together, which we’ve pursued as market-basket analysis for ages. The most common and typically most useful form of network visualization consists of nodes (things, such as people or products) and links (connections between things), displayed as a diagram in various arrangements. When networks are large, consisting of thousands or millions of nodes, node-link diagrams can become so overwhelmingly cluttered, they’re sometimes called “giant hairballs.” Consequently, those who study information visualization have been trying to develop ways to simplify and clarify these diagrams. A new approach described in a paper titled

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Measuring the Topical Specificity of Online Communities. #analytics #SNA

Presentation from the Extended Semantic Web Conference 2013
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The Seas of Plastic Interactive - by dumpark. #dataviz #infoviz

The Seas of Plastic Interactive - by dumpark. #dataviz #infoviz | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Interactive Infographic - Plastic pollution in the oceans represents a major global environmental challenge. At a global scale, man-made debris has been observed to accumulate in remote areas of the ocean in large circulating gyres.
luiy's insight:

Accumulation of marine floating debris originated from highly populated coastal regions

 

Plastic pollution in the oceans represents a major global environmental challenge. At a global scale, man-made debris has been observed to accumulate in remote areas of the ocean in large circulating gyres. The source of this plastic is assumed to be mostly land based, however little is known about the relative contribution of different land based sources to each gyre.

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Stats about mobile usage in the world / kevin kelly: Who da thunk a decade ago? ...


Via Alessio Erioli
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[ Interesting -- > stats about mobile usage in the world ]

 

--------------------------------------------------

 

Mobile-broadband subscriptions have climbed
from 268 million in 2007 to 2.1 billion in 2013. This
reflects an average annual growth rate of 40%,
making mobile broadband the most dynamic ICT
market.
In developing countries, the number of mobilebroadband subscriptions more than doubled from
2011 to 2013 (from 472 million to 1.16 billion) and
surpassed those in developed countries in 2013.
Africa is the region with the highest growth rates
over the past three years and mobile-broadband
penetration has increased from 2% in 2010 to 11%
in 2013.

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Review of Social media as #surveillance: Rethinking visibility in a converging world | #privacy #dataawareness

Review of Social media as #surveillance: Rethinking visibility in a converging world | #privacy #dataawareness | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Review of Social media as surveillance: Rethinking visibility in a converging world
luiy's insight:

Social media platforms, like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube, have become “information warehouses”, processing, storing, and analyzing a wide range of personal, communication and usage behavior data. Daniel Trottier’s book Social media as surveillance is a great resource for readers to understand social media surveillance at the interpersonal or institutional levels, where “surveillance” has been conducted by individuals, companies, or the government agencies in the virtual world.

 

This book discusses risks posed by social media surveillance for information users far beyond privacy concerns, hence traditional “care and vigilance” is inefficient. Thus, attempts to manage individual or institutional online presence are significantly complicated by social media. For example, Facebook friends routinely expose each other, and such information transfers from one context to another, even though the “targets” say nothing about themselves.

 

Social media as surveillance presents empirical research with a range of personal and professional social media users (such as individuals, institutions, marketers, and police agencies). Using Facebook as a case study, Trottier describes rapidly growing multi–purpose social media monitoring practices. Such scrutiny activities augment one another and lead to a quick spread of online information (visibility), which is vital for new sociality and power relations.

 

Trottier’s research collects data through detailed interviews with interested parties, such as students, university employees, businesses owners, and police. These interviewees not only reveal how social media is used as surveillance tools, but also discover what is happening and what people think might be happening now. The book gives an insight into both the positive and the negative sides of the social media surveillance issue, as well as some early warnings to future developments.

 

Trottier examines four different aspects of surveillance: interpersonal surveillance (through which people monitor each other); institutional surveillance (through which institutions,i.e., universities or employers, watch over their students or employees); market surveillance (through which businesses track their customers, potential customers, or even random Web surfers) and policing surveillance (through which authorities might spy on technically anything).

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An introduction to Collective Intelligence. #COINs #MAS #agents

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This paper surveys the emerging science of how to design a “COllective INtelligence” (COIN). A COIN is a large multi-agent system where:


i) There is little to no centralized communication or control.
ii) There is a provided world utility function that rates the possible histories of thefull system.


In particular, we are interested in COINs in which each agent runs a reinforcement learning (RL) algorithm. The conventional approach to designing large distributed systems to optimize a world utility does not use agents running RL algorithms. Rather, that approach begins with explicit modeling of the dynamicsof the overall system, followed by detailed hand-tuning of the interactions betweenthe components to ensure that they “cooperate” as far as the world utility is concerned. This approach is labor-intensive, often results in highly nonrobust systems,and usually results in design techniques that have limited applicability.

In contrast, we wish to solve the COIN design problem implicitly, via the “adaptive”character of the RL algorithms of each of the agents. This approach introduces anentirely new, profound design problem:

 

Assuming the RL algorithms are able toachieve high rewards, what reward functions for the individual agents will, whenpursued by those agents, result in high world utility? In other words, what reward functions will best ensure that we do not have phenomena like the tragedy of thecommons, Braess’s paradox, or the liquidity trap?


Although still very young, research specifically concentrating on the COIN design problem has already resulted in successes in artificial domains, in particular in packet-routing, the leader-follower problem, and in variants of Arthur’s El Farol bar problem. It is expected that as it matures and draws upon other disciplines related to COINs, this research will greatly expand the range of tasks addressable by human engineers. Moreover, in addition to drawing on them, such a fully developed science of COIN design may provide much insight into other already established scientific fields, such as economics, game theory, and population biology.

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Quantified Society : Data Darwinism and the future of work. #datascience

Quantified Society :  Data Darwinism and the future of work. #datascience | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Uber, a San Francisco-based personal transportation oriented startup, is facing a backlash from a few of its drivers. But the confrontation is less about Uber and more about the challenges facing a society being rebuilt because of connectedness.
luiy's insight:

Are we ready for a Quantified Society

However, if you look at the story from the context of just Uber, then you will miss the real narrative. This isn’t the last time we will hear about it — there are more Uber-like companies with on-demand workforce. There have been incidents on AirBnB.

 

That last comment by Alazzeh resonated with me because it encapsulates what work will be in the future and what the next evolution of labor unrest could be. And it also highlights a problem we have not thought about just yet: data-darwinism.

 

In the industrial era, labor unrest came when the workers felt that the owners were profitting wrongfully from them. I wonder if in the connected age, we are going to see labor unrest when folks are unceremoniously dropped from the on-demand labor pool.

 

What are the labor laws in a world where workforce is on demand? And an even bigger question is how are we as a society going to create rules, when data, feedback and, most importantly, reputation are part an always-shifting equation? (Reputation, by the way, is going to be the key metric of the future, Quora founder and Facebook CTO Adam D’Angelo told me in an interview.)

 

At present we rank photos, rate restaurants, like or dislike brands, retweet things we love. But if this idea of collaborative consumption takes hold — and I have no reason to think it won’t — we will be building a quantified society. We will be ranking real humans. The freelance workers — like the Uber drivers and Postmates couriers — are getting quantified. The best ones will continue to do well, but what about the others, the victims of this data darwinism? Do they have any protection or any rights?

I admit I don’t have any answers. And while I am as much of a techno-optimist as the next blogger, I don’t even know where to start. I do think it is important for us to start talking about what the etiquette of a connected and a quantified society will be.

 

I will use myself as an example. I would say, on most days, that I live up to my idea of a normal online citizen — living online like I do offline. I try not to talk about my family. I am an active Uber user. And I take every opportunity to provide feedback.  But I don’t take the ratings system lightly, regardless of whether I’m giving someone one star or three stars or five stars.

 

Just as I am not shy about awarding five stars for timeliness and quality of service, I am happy to chastise, too. And I do the same for every service I typically use — Postmates or TaskRabbit or AirBnB or Exec. What if I give someone a wrong ranking? Given how often we are likely to rank and rate in the future, will wrong ratings even bring about any sense of guilt?

It is the 21st century. We are more narcissistic and more self-absorbed. Does human decency and sense of fair play shift to the online realm as well? It’s hard to know. I mean, we have seen some of the nicest people in real life turn into a baboon’s backside once they are online and are anonymous. Authenticity in a world where we are trying to play a role in a movie starring us takes on a entirely different hue.

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Dodgy data: the iceberg to science’s Titanic. #controverses

Dodgy data: the iceberg to science’s Titanic. #controverses | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
There’s an epidemic going on in science: experiments that no one can reproduce, studies that have to be retracted, and the emergence of a lurking data reliability iceberg.
luiy's insight:

There’s an epidemic going on in science, and it’s not of the H7N9 bird flu variety. The groundbreaking, novel results that scientists are incentivized to publish (and which journalists are then compelled to cover) seem peppered with gaps: experiments that no one can reproduce, studies that have to be retracted, and the emergence of an iceberg of an integrity crisis, both for scientists personally and for those who rely — medically, financially, professionally — on the data they produce.

 

As a recent PhD, I can attest to the fact that many researchers first experience the iceberg as no more than an ice cube-sized annoyance impeding their work towards a Nobel Prize. Maybe the experimental instructions from a rival lab don’t quite seem to work. Maybe the data you’re trying to replicate for your homeworkassignment don’t add up, as UMass graduate student Thomas Herndon found. If a spreadsheet error that underpins sweeping global economic policy doesn’t convince you, here is some more evidence that we are already scraping the iceberg of a research and data reliability crisis.

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Managing collective intelligence - Toward a New Corporate Governance

In a production economy, value creation depends on land, labor and capital. In a knowledge economy, value creation depends mainly on the ideas and innovations to be found in people’s heads. Those ideas cannot be forcibly extracted. All one can do is mobilize collective intelligence and knowledge. If knowing how to produce and sell has become a basic necessity, it no longer constitutes a sufficiently differentiating factor in international competition. In the past, enterprises were industrial and commercial; in the future, they will increasingly have to be intelligent.


Via Howard Rheingold
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Deborah Verran's comment, May 25, 2013 6:26 PM
Excellent summary on slideshare
María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, July 9, 2013 2:28 PM

Me gusta esta idea para las organizaciones del futuro. La inteligencia colectiva como motor de cambio en las sociedades.

John Poole's curator insight, July 30, 2013 8:21 AM

Knowledge management article

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The Future Of Technology Isn’t Mobile, It’s Contextual #contextawareness

The Future Of Technology Isn’t Mobile, It’s Contextual #contextawareness | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
You’re walking home alone on a quiet street. You hear footsteps approaching quickly from behind. It’s nighttime. Your senses scramble to help your brain figure out what to do. You listen for signs of threat or glance backward.
luiy's insight:
CONTEXTUAL COMPUTING: OUR SIXTH, SEVENTH, AND EIGHTH SENSES

In the coming years, there will be a shift toward what is now known as contextual computing, defined in large part by Georgia Tech researchersAnind Dey and Gregory Abowd about a decade ago. Always-present computers, able to sense the objective and subjective aspects of a given situation, will augment our ability to perceive and act in the moment based on where we are, who we’re with, and our past experiences. These are our sixth, seventh, and eighth senses.

Hints of this shift are already arriving. Mobile devices with GPS deliver location-based services, which sets a baseline for the many ways your phone can gather information it will use to make your life easier down the line. Amazon’s and Netflix’s recommendation engines, while not magnificently intuitive, feed you book and video recommendations based on your behavior and ratings. Facebook’s and Twitter’s valuations are premised on the notion that they can leverage knowledge of your acquaintances and interests to push out relevant content and market to you in more effective ways.

 

YOUR PERSONAL GRAPH CONTAINS (GULP) ALL YOUR BELIEFS

This is the set of data relating to a person’s deepest held beliefs, core values, and personality. It’s what makes a person unique in the world, just as the social graph helps to show what makes her similar to others. The data set is under-developed at the moment, and it’s quite difficult to design for, even conceptually.

Given that psychology still struggles to explain exactly how our personal identities function, it’s not surprising that documenting such information in a computable form is slow to emerge. There are early indicators that this will change, however. For example, Proust.com, a relatively new (and struggling) social-networking service, asks users to document intimate details of their lives and their beliefs based on the idea of the famed Proust Questionnaire. People have, quite reasonably so, been reluctant to share such information in a publicly viewable social network.

A more successful example is Evernote, which has built a large business based on making it incredibly easy and secure to document both recently consumed information and your innermost thoughts. Scraping such intimate files for data is currently the questionable realm of the NSA, however. Entirely new solutions will need to be created if the potential of the personal graph is to be reached.

 

YOUR BEHAVIOR CAN BE EASILY GRAPHED

It’s easy for data to depict what you actually do instead of what you claim to do. Sensors do the job. So do, if less elegantly, self-reporting mechanisms. This data can sit in pivotal contrast to the interest graph, allowing computers to know, perhaps better than you, how likely you are to go for a jog. It would be useful, too, for a travel site that notes how you tell friends you’d like to visit China but records that you only vacation in Europe. Rather than uselessly recommending vacation deals to Beijing, a smart travel app would instead feed you deals to Paris or Berlin. The behavior graph provides the foundation, to some extent, of Google Search, Netflix recommendations, Amazon recommendations, iTunes Genius, Nike+ run tracking, FourSquare, FitBit, and the entire "quantified self" movement. When mashed against the other three graphs, there’s a potential for real insight.

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The Bridges and Brokers of Global Campaigns in the Context of Social Media. #indignados #occupy

The Bridges and Brokers of Global Campaigns in the Context of Social Media. #indignados #occupy | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
We investigate how online networks mediate contentious politics by analyzing communication around a global campaign launched in May 2012. We analyze about 450,0
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We investigate how online networks mediate contentious politics by analyzing communication around a global campaign launched in May 2012. We analyze about 450,000 Twitter messages related to the Occupy and ‘indignados’ movements. We test how well integrated the two movements are; we characterize users posting content relevant to both movements; and we examine the robustness of the network to node removal. We find that global connectivity depends on a small percentage of users and that the two movements are mostly concerned with their local struggles: the bridges connecting the two flows of information channel just a small percentage of all information exchanged. We use these findings to assess theoretical claims about political protests in the digital age.


Keywords: contentious politics, digital protests, online social networks, structural constraint, modularity structure, network robustness



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The Illusion of Privacy: You are Not in Control - Fake It!. #privacy #dataawareness

The Illusion of Privacy: You are Not in Control - Fake It!. #privacy #dataawareness | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

Are you an avid user of Snapchat, that kind of person who likes bits that go poof? If you or your kids are under 25, chances are you do. The wildly popular photo-sharing app—which promises that pictures self-destruct after 10 seconds—is a clear sign that many people long for privacy. Snapchat claims to have finally delivered to us a medium that does not forever save and store our data. We want that! Of course we do.

Unfortunately, Snapchat doesn’t quite transport us to the land of data privacy. It sounds too good to be true, and it is. In much the same way that Facebook deludes people into the belief that they can actually be private, it gives us a false sense of security. Twitter makes no bones about privacy; it is, and claims to be, an open public network where you are public by default. With the likes Snapchat and Facebook—and most of social media, in fact—many mistakenly believe in the illusion of being private.

 

The specific problem with Snapchat, of course, is that while the photo message on Snapchat disappears from the phone of the recipient after a few seconds, it does not prevent the nimble-fingered receiver from taking a screenshot. If that happens you get an alert, but what good does that really do? It certainly doesn’t prevent the screenshot from being shared with others, as happened at this New Jersey high school. There’s another hack to work around that alert. And last but far from least, a US-based company Decipher Forensics told the Guardian that they figured out how to recover photos from the Android version of Snapchat in a matter of days. The company is now trying to recover photos from the iOS version of Snapchat. The photo-app has been downloaded more than five million times in the Android marketplace and has been at the top of the Apple app store for quite a while.

 

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Modelling and Analysis of User Behaviour in Online Communities. #roles #analytics

Modelling and Analysis of User Behaviour in Online Communities Sofia Angeletou, Matthew Rowe and Harith Alani Knowledge Media Institute, The Open U
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Carbon Visuals: New York's carbon emissions - in real time. #dataviz #CO2 #Environment

Carbon Visuals: New York's carbon emissions - in real time. #dataviz #CO2 #Environment | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

In 2010 New York City added 54 million metric tons of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere (75% from buildings, the bulk of the rest from transport) but that number means little to most people because few of us have a sense of scale for atmospheric pollution.

 

Carbon Visuals, supported by Environmental Defense Fund, have created a film that makes those emissions feel more real - the total emissions and the rate of emission. Designed to engage the ‘person on the street’, this version is exploratory and still work in progress.

 

Emissions in 2010 were 12% less than 2005 emissions. The City of New York is on track to reduce emissions by 30% by 2017 - an ambitious target. Mayor Bloomberg’s office has not been involved in the creation or dissemination of this video.

See how we can help cities engage their citizens in carbon issues.

See video on YouTube

 

Street-level view of 10 metre (33 ft) spheres of carbon dioxide gas emerging at a rate of one every 0.58 seconds

 

For the technically minded:

In 2010 (the latest year for which data is available) New York City added 54,349,650 metric tons of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere = 148,903 tons a day = 6,204 tons an hour = 1.72 tons a second.

 

City of New York, Inventory of New York City Greenhouse Gas Emissions, September 2011, by Jonathan Dickinson and Andrea Tenorio. Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability, New York, 2011

At standard pressure and 59 °F a metric ton of carbon dioxide gas would fill a sphere 33 feet across (density of CO₂ = 1.87 kg/m⊃3;).

 

If this is how carbon dioxide gas was actually emitted in New York we would see one of these spheres appear every 0.58 seconds.

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