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e-Xploration
antropologo.net, dataviz, collective intelligence, algorithms, social learning, social change, digital humanities
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Dataiku : #bigdata community | #dataInnovation #datascience #workforce

Dataiku : #bigdata community | #dataInnovation #datascience #workforce | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:
Build your data lab 

However, building such a data lab can prove to be difficult.
Even though many data science technologies are freely available in open-source, choosing the right one(s) remain complex and integrating them cumbersome.
Furthermore, data science skills are rare, and it might not be obvious how to train your people to these new techniques.

Last but not the least, integrating the data-driven innovation to your existing product teams can be a hell of conflicting mindsets.

 

Introducing Dataiku, the data lab accelerator


Dataiku was founded by Big Data veterans to help you build and grow your data lab. Dataiku founders believe that data-innovation can be achieved successfully by any organization with the right  combination of technology, people and methodology.

First, we are, at Dataiku, passionate about technology. We are putting several years of expertise into the Dataiku platform to collect, reshape, analyze and share  data. Our goal is to dramatically decrease the infrastructure, software and human costs for data science projects.

Second, we are, at Dataiku, enthusiast about data-driven innovation. We want to share this passion, infuse a data science mindset to your teams and help your data lab to develop. We are ready to help you find the hidden data treasures within your data history and kick-start your first data science initiatives.

Finally, we are, at Dataiku, fond of data scientists. We’re putting together a community of data science experts that can complement your team before your lab is fully operational.

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Datavisualisation: zoom sur 5 start-ups françaises #dataviz

Datavisualisation: zoom sur 5 start-ups françaises #dataviz | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Twitter vient de racheter Lucky Sort, une startup spécialisée dans l'analyse et la  data-visualisation. Zoom sur 5…

Via Audrey Bardon
luiy's insight:

Trends --- > sur dataviz à la France

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The Banality of ‘Don’t Be Evil’ by Julian Assange | #controverses #risk

The Banality of ‘Don’t Be Evil’ by Julian Assange | #controverses #risk | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Two Google leaders have written a manifesto for technocratic imperialism.
luiy's insight:

“THE New Digital Age” is a startlingly clear and provocative blueprint for technocratic imperialism, from two of its leading witch doctors, Eric Schmidt and Jared Cohen, who construct a new idiom for United States global power in the 21st century. This idiom reflects the ever closer union between the State Department and Silicon Valley, as personified by Mr. Schmidt, the executive chairman of Google, and Mr. Cohen, a former adviser to Condoleezza Rice and Hillary Clinton who is now director of Google Ideas.


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The authors offer an expertly banalized version of tomorrow’s world: the gadgetry of decades hence is predicted to be much like what we have right now — only cooler. “Progress” is driven by the inexorable spread of American consumer technology over the surface of the earth. Already, every day, another million or so Google-run mobile devices are activated. Google will interpose itself, and hence the United States government, between the communications of every human being not in China (naughty China). Commodities just become more marvelous; young, urban professionals sleep, work and shop with greater ease and comfort; democracy is insidiously subverted by technologies of surveillance, and control is enthusiastically rebranded as “participation”; and our present world order of systematized domination, intimidation and oppression continues, unmentioned, unafflicted or only faintly perturbed.


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The Department of Justice admitted in March that it was in its third year of a continuing criminal investigation of WikiLeaks. Court testimony states that its targets include “the founders, owners, or managers of WikiLeaks.” One alleged source, Bradley Manning, faces a 12-week trial beginning tomorrow, with 24 prosecution witnesses expected to testify in secret.

This book is a balefully seminal work in which neither author has the language to see, much less to express, the titanic centralizing evil they are constructing. “What Lockheed Martin was to the 20th century,” they tell us, “technology and cybersecurity companies will be to the 21st.” Without even understanding how, they have updated and seamlessly implemented George Orwell’s prophecy. If you want a vision of the future, imagine Washington-backed Google Glasses strapped onto vacant human faces — forever. Zealots of the cult of consumer technology will find little to inspire them here, not that they ever seem to need it. But this is essential reading for anyone caught up in the struggle for the future, in view of one simple imperative: Know your enemy.


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The Dictatorship of Data | MIT Technology Review | #bigdata #controverses #privacy

The Dictatorship of Data | MIT Technology Review | #bigdata #controverses #privacy | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Robert McNamara epitomizes the hyper-rational executive led astray by numbers.
luiy's insight:

Big data is poised to transform society, from how we diagnose illness to how we educate children, even making it possible for a car to drive itself. Information is emerging as a new economic input, a vital resource. Companies, governments, and even individuals will be measuring and optimizing everything possible.

 

But there is a dark side. Big data erodes privacy. And when it is used to make predictions about what we are likely to do but haven’t yet done, it threatens freedom as well. Yet big data also exacerbates a very old problem: relying on the numbers when they are far more fallible than we think. Nothing underscores the consequences of data analysis gone awry more than the story of Robert McNamara.


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Google’s deference to data has been taken to extremes. To determine the best color of a toolbar on the website, Marissa Mayer, when she was one of Google’s top executives before going to Yahoo, once ordered staff to test 41 gradations of blue to see which ones people used more. In 2009, Google’s top designer, Douglas Bowman, quit in a huff because he couldn’t stand the constant quantification of everything. “I had a recent debate over whether a border should be 3, 4 or 5 pixels wide, and was asked to prove my case. I can’t operate in an environment like that,” he wrote on a blog announcing his resignation. “When a company is filled with engineers, it turns to engineering to solve problems. Reduce each decision to a simple logic problem. That data eventually becomes a crutch for every decision, paralyzing the company.”

 

This is the dictatorship of data. And it recalls the thinking that led the United States to escalate the Vietnam War partly on the basis of body counts, rather than basing decisions on more meaningful metrics. “It is true enough that not every conceivable complex human situation can be fully reduced to the lines on a graph, or to percentage points on a chart, or to figures on a balance sheet,” said McNamara in a speech in 1967, as domestic protests were growing. “But all reality can be reasoned about. And not to quantify what can be quantified is only to be content with something less than the full range of reason.” If only the right data were used in the right way, not respected for data’s sake.

 

Robert Strange McNamara went on to run the World Bank throughout the 1970s, then painted himself as a dove in the 1980s. He became an outspoken critic of nuclear weapons and a proponent of environmental protection. Later in life he produced a memoir, In Retrospect, that criticized the thinking behind the war and his own decisions as secretary of defense. “We were wrong, terribly wrong,” he famously wrote. But McNamara, who died in 2009 at age 93, was referring to the war’s broad strategy. On the question of data, and of body counts in particular, he remained unrepentant. He admitted that many of the statistics were “misleading or erroneous.” “But things you can count, you ought to count. Loss of life is one.”

 

Big data will be a foundation for improving the drugs we take, the way we learn, and the actions of individuals. However, the risk is that its extraordinary powers may lure us to commit the sin of McNamara: to become so fixated on the data, and so obsessed with the power and promise it offers, that we fail to appreciate its inherent ability to mislead.



Read more: http://www.technologyreview.com/news/514591/the-dictatorship-of-data/#ixzz2V5UfhVMo ;
From MIT Technology Review 
Follow us: @techreview on Twitter | technologyreview on Facebook



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Billions of Geotagged Tweets Visualized in Twitter's Amazing Maps

Billions of Geotagged Tweets Visualized in Twitter's Amazing Maps | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Ever wonder what it would look like to plot every single geotagged tweet since 2009 on a map? Twitter has done just that.
luiy's insight:

Ever wonder what it would look like to plot every single geotagged tweet since 2009 on a map? Twitter has done just that.

Twitter posted these maps of Europe, New York City, Tokyo and Istanbul on its blog Friday. They use billions of geotagged tweets: Every dot represents a tweet, with the brighter colors showing a higher concentration of tweets. It's pretty amazing how the mapped-out tweets clearly match with population centers, highways and the like — though perhaps that's obvious.

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.. when "extremely violent and sadistic imagery is two clicks away-Sex education struggles with porn | #sexEducation

.. when "extremely violent and sadistic imagery is two clicks away-Sex education struggles with porn | #sexEducation | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
I

In an age when "extremely violent and sadistic imagery is two clicks away" school sex education is struggling to keep pace, a study suggests.

 

Pornography can distort children's attitudes to sex said Deputy Children's Commissioner Sue Berelowitz.

Urgent action is needed to develop children's resilience to extremely graphic types of porn argues the study.

The government said its curriculum changes would teach children from the age of five to stay safe online.

The report, led by the University of Middlesex and commissioned by the Office of The Children's Commissioner, suggests some children are exposed to pornography while still at primary school, and the proportion increases with age with "a significant proportion of children and young people" viewing pornography.

Lessons on relationships should start in primary school, it argues, while relationships and sex education should be compulsory in all schools and include time for pupils to discuss the impact of pornography.

Some types of online porn are "very different" to what today's parents may have seen as children, said Ms Berelowitz.

 

"Just a few clicks away on any mobile phone, on any tablet for example, children can find really graphic depictions of extreme and violent sexual acts."


Via Wildcat2030
luiy's insight:

Building resilience


The authors say the sex education curriculum needs to be more relevant to young people's lives and include pornography.

They also call for more emphasis on relationship education in secondary schools.

 

"We think it's really important that the curriculum includes pornography to help build children's resilience to what they are seeing on the internet - to help them differentiate between what they are seeing and good healthy relationships which are not about submission and not about being forced," said Ms Berelowitz.

 

She added that parents needed to recognise the effect of pornography on their children.

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Why we are all digital anthropologists

Why we are all digital anthropologists | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
A couple of years ago, I came across a film about London's East Street market which in the 80's was a regular Sunday outing for my family.

Via Andrea Naranjo
luiy's insight:

A couple of years ago, I came across a film about London's East Street market which in the 80's was a regular Sunday outing for my family.

The memories flooded back, I sent the link to my brother and we vowed to visit soon to buy cheap greetings cards and show our support. And then another film grabbed my attention. A young Afghan girl learning to drive allowed us a slice of her life. It made me sit up.

 

MyStreet is the website hosting these films and many others -- encouraging the use of digital tools to open up the experience of making and sharing your own 'story'. Both local and global audiences can tap in -- a connection to something familiar or a learning of something unknown.

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#neurocentrism : Distinguishing Brain From Mind

#neurocentrism : Distinguishing Brain From Mind | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
In coming years, neuroscience will answer questions we don't even yet know to ask. Sometimes, though, focus on the brain is misleading.

Via Spaceweaver
luiy's insight:

Understanding the brain is of course essential to developing treatments for devastating illnesses like schizophrenia and Parkinson's. More abstract but no less compelling, the functioning of the brain is intimately tied to our sense of self, our identity, our memories and aspirations. But the excitement to explore the brain has spawned a new fixation that my colleague Scott Lilienfeld and I call neurocentrism -- the view that human behavior can be best explained by looking solely or primarily at the brain.

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#Electroceuticals: swapping drugs for devices

#Electroceuticals: swapping drugs for devices | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Bioelectronics is the field of developing medicines that use electrical impulses to modulate the body's neural circuits as an alternative to drug-based interventions. How far away are we from having these very targeted "electroceuticals"?


Via Szabolcs Kósa
luiy's insight:

Twenty years ago, neurosurgeon and researcher Kevin Tracey was studying whether an experimental molecule called CNI-1493 could limit damage to the brain after a stroke. His team was injecting the molecule into the brains of rats during a stroke to see how successfully it prevented swelling -- an immune system response -- of the brain.

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Ajan Reginald's curator insight, May 29, 2013 5:12 AM

fascinating approach goes beyond pain relief

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A Thousand Milieus : recommendations systems | #MAS

A Thousand Milieus : recommendations systems | #MAS | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Berlin based designer and programmer Christopher Warnow had a closer look at the interest graph between people reading the same books.

Via Alessio Erioli
luiy's insight:

Christopher Warnow developed an application that loads recommendations for a given book on Amzon.com and converts visualizes the information as a network. Soon, milieus of interest emerge showing related topics and additional literature.

 

The application is written in Processing leveraging the power of the open source graph visualization library Gephi Toolkit. You can download the tool and read more information on Christopher’s website.

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Understanding the structures, antecedents and outcomes of organisational learning and knowledge transfer: a multi-theoretical and multilevel network analysis | #KM

luiy's insight:

Abstract:Thegoalofthisstudywastodevelopamulti-theoreticalandmultilevel
model to study organisational learning and knowledge transfer. We employed a social network approach to theorise and empirically test the structures, antecedents and outcomes of intra-organisational information retrieval and allocation. Data were collected from 110 individuals across nine work teams, and analysed using Exponential Random Graph Modelling (ERGM) technique. The results found a multiplexity and reciprocity of team members’ information retrieval and allocation, as well as a predominant centralised structure of information retrieval. Furthermore, there was a tendency for members to retrieve and allocate information across job positions. Finally, members were more satisfied with their team work when proactively retrieving information from others than when receiving unsolicited information allocated from others. This study has important theoretical and practical implications for understanding and managing organisational knowledge and learning networks.

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Who dares to dodge Google's information tax? | McKenzie Wark

Who dares to dodge Google's information tax? | McKenzie Wark | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

There used to be all sorts of criticisms of the old "culture industries" like Hollywood and the top 40, which entertained us with stories or songs that always ended on an upbeat note, no matter how false. But at least the culture industries went to the bother of entertaining us. Their replacements don't even bother. They expect us to entertain each other, and pay a tax for it. Facebook or Google's YouTube are not the culture industries so much as the vulture industries, taking an information surcharge from us while we amuse each other, and selling us to advertisers. Like do-it-yourself commercial TV.

 

These are all elements of what I call the "spectacle of disintegration". The old spectacle of television and radio papered the world with images of what the lovely soul of the commodity was supposed to look like. We were at least still free to daydream while we sat idly watching.

 

But in the spectacle of disintegration, all that breaks apart. The big screen decays into so many little screens. Our leisure time is now to be spent producing information for the vulture industries of Google and co, in an unequal exchange of information. In exchange for the poll tax of personal data, we get to watch each other's cat videos, while Google becomes some new version of the state, presiding over all our bitty lives, master of all our data, in aggregate.

 

Like any state, Google has its patriots. But there are also those who think this latest version of the spectacle offers some quirky avenues for having fun at its expense. Its time for a certain opacity, a certain glamour of obscurity. Not all the information we offer up has to be even remotely true.

It's 45 years since the failure of May '68, that last attempt to rock the old kind of state. Afterwards the Situationists, who gave us the concept of the spectacle, disbanded. But they did not go silent. They pioneered ways of discreetly carving out spaces where other codes apply, protected by cryptic passwords. Perhaps some of their subtle arts might work within the belly of this new digital beast, so that we might live within it, but not give it our undivided attention.

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The Experimental Man at #Big Data in #Biomedicine. #health

The Experimental Man at #Big Data in #Biomedicine. #health | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

At this week’s Big Data in Biomedicine conference, David Ewing Duncan, author of Experimental Man, delivered a keynote speech titled “You as Data: Can Big Data Predict Your Future Health?”

 

Using himself as a guinea pig to explore the new age of personalized health, Duncan has collected close to 30,000 genetic traits about himself through numerous medical tests and scans and noted, “If everyone on the planet had this much data collected, you’d be in something called yottabytes”

 

In his talk, Duncan revealed what he’s learned from this tremendous reservoir of personal health data and discussed promising biomedical technologies and research that may boost longevity and lead to radical life extension. He urged attendees to contemplate how long they wanted to live - giving them the choice of 80 years, 120 years, 150 years or forever -and the implications of living that long.

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Why Big Data Is Not Truth : “Big Data fundamentalism" | #bigdata #controverses

Why Big Data Is Not Truth : “Big Data fundamentalism" | #bigdata #controverses | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Don’t let the rhetoric fool you, a Microsoft researcher says: Big Data is a human tool, which means it is subject to all kinds of miscollection, misapplication and abuse.

Via Pierre Levy
luiy's insight:

Kate Crawford, a researcher at Microsoft Research, calls the problem :


“Big Data fundamentalism"


— the idea with larger data sets, we get closer to objective truth.” Speaking at a conference in Berkeley, Calif., on Thursday, she identified what she calls “six myths of Big Data.”

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Intriguing Networks's curator insight, June 2, 2013 4:56 AM

It still is all in the interpretation...

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The minorities in the high tech workforce | #minorities #hitech #workforce

The minorities in the high tech workforce | #minorities #hitech #workforce | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Citing a critical shortage Silicon Valley heavyweights have been lobbying for immigration reform that will allow high tech firms to hire more workers...
luiy's insight:

Code.org, the high-profile industry effort to push for more computer science and programming in K-12 education, correctly highlights the growing need for programmers and the dearth of educational opportunities to learn to code. But the reasons for the high tech talent gap run deeper than a simple lack of curricular offerings.

 

The statistics on the code.org site are silent as to issues of diversity and equity, and fail to point out that coders are overwhelmingly white, Asian, and male. If almost all non-Asian minorities and women feel that coding is not for them, we have reduced our potential pool of high tech talent to a fraction of the population.

 

Despite a deserved reputation for progressiveness, the tech sector is highly exclusionary to those who don't fit the geek stereotype--and this tendency is getting worse, especially in Silicon Valley. You might have heard, based on 2011 numbers, that only 25 percent of the U.S. high tech workforce is female, and the percentages have been in steady decline since the nineties. The numbers for minority women are even more dismal. Hispanic women represent 1 percent of the high tech workforce, and African-American women don't fare much better, at 3 percent. The better the jobs, the lower the proportions are of women and non-Asian minorities. Despite the diversity of the population of the region, Silicon Valley, which boasts the highest salaries among tech regions, fares much worse than the national numbers.

 

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We know that the more diverse the ecosystem of talent, the more innovative are the solutions that result. If we really care about the talent gap in high tech, innovation, and entrepreneurism, we need to do more than look overseas, or push classes and school requirements at kids. We need to build a sense of relevance and social connection into what it means to be a coder for a wide diversity of kids. Groups such as Black Girls Code, Mozilla’s Webmaker Mentors, Urban TxT, a growing network of makerspaces in diverse communities, and the vibrant community of youngScratch programmers point to ways in which girls, and Black and Latino kids can be recruited into coding culture and social networks. The talent is there to be developed if we can diversify our imagination of who belongs to the coding inner circle, and how we might invite them to join.

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What is #Quantum Computing? An interactive explainer

What is #Quantum Computing? An interactive explainer | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Scientists say quantum computers could be built to operate up to a million times faster than conventional computers. But how do they work? And how close are we to putting them in homes and offices around the world?


Via Szabolcs Kósa
luiy's insight:

Between D-Wave’s quasi-quantum device and various ion-trapping machines, there are plenty of exciting developments on the quantum computing front. Last week, a D-Wave machine consisting of 439 qubits processed an equation 3600 times faster than a conventional computer.

That said, the most complex prime factorization processed by Shor’s Algorithm is still only... 21 (the answer’s 3 and 7. Easy to come up with on paper, not so easy using atoms).

 

But quantum computing is about more than cracking codes. The D-Wave device Google announced last week will be used to improve machine learning. That means better robots and maybe dystopia, if you believe our editor Adam Penenberg. But it also means producing better models for understanding the world around us (and, since this is Google we’re talking about, better models for organizing and searching through all that data).

“Machine learning is all about building better models of the world to make more accurate predictions,” writes Google’s Director of Engineering Hartmut Neven in a blog post. “If we want to cure diseases, we need better models of how they develop. If we want to create effective environmental policies, we need better models of what’s happening to our climate. And if we want to build a more useful search engine, we need to better understand spoken questions and what’s on the web so you get the best answer.”

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#datavis apps : Twitter Mapping Tools

#datavis apps : Twitter Mapping Tools | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Twitter is undeniably useful as a standalone service, but it becomes so much more fun when you start factoring in all the cool tools and awesome apps available. We've previously...
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Can Patents Keep Up with Technology?: How do we recognize an invention when we see one? | #patentTrolls

Can Patents Keep Up with Technology?: How do we recognize an invention when we see one? | #patentTrolls | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
How do we recognize an invention when we see one?

-

The U.S. patent system is a popular target. Recently we have heard that big portfolios of large companies pose a threat to small inventors, “patent trolls” who exist solely to sue real companies have hijacked the marketplace for new ideas and colossal lawsuits prove that America's patent system is broken.

The patent system is indeed in the midst of a challenge. Software technology gives us the GPS in our mobile devices, CT scans that provide early health diagnostics, and other wonders, but circumscribing such technologies in a patent is difficult. Advances in genetics and biotech are critically important to treating many diseases and require huge investments that rely on patent protection, but it is often hard to know where the rights of the inventors end and the public's begin. Should 3-D print files be eligible for patent prosecution? What breadth of protection should be available for the algorithms that extract knowledge from enormous aggregations of data? Each fundamental advance calls for reexamination and adaptation, which is why the patent system is, and must be, the subject of continuous improvement.


Via Wildcat2030
luiy's insight:

Beyond first-to-file, the AIA also responds to concerns about the quality of issued patents by providing cost-effective, fast ways to comment on pending patents and to challenge issued ones. These new opportunities apply to all patent applications and patents but are especially helpful in software, where historical references are difficult to find, and in biotech, where fine lines must be drawn between discoveries eligible for protection and ones free for all to use. Still, the AIA has only recently gone into effect, and the ramifications of its new processes and procedures are just beginning to be felt. As Scientific American's March 9, 1878, issue stated, “our Patent Office [is] a great National University, whose diplomas of merit for successful endeavor [are] infinitely more valuable than those of any college.” This statement is still true.

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Steven Bonacorsi's curator insight, May 23, 2013 10:32 AM

We invite you to join the Lean Six Sigma Group or any of our Subgroups http://www.linkedin.com/groups?subgroups=&gid=37987 where Lean Six Sigma Jobs are Free

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#wirearchy : What If Everything Ran Like the Internet? | #self #adapting #complex

#wirearchy : What If Everything Ran Like the Internet? | #self #adapting #complex | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

When the Internet was first starting to catch on in the 1980s, I was invited, as a representative of a large business consulting organization, to a day-long seminar explaining what this new phenomenon was and how businesses should be responding to it. It was led by a man who now makes millions as a social media guru (I won’t embarrass him by identifying him), but at the time he warned that the Internet had no future. The reason, he said, was that it was “anarchic” — there was no management, no control, no way of fixing things quickly if they got “out of hand”. The solution, he said, was for business and government leaders to get together and create an orderly alternative — “Internet 2″ he called it — that would replace the existing Internet when it inevitably imploded. Of course, he couldn’t have been more wrong.


Via Complexity Digest, Spaceweaver, Wildcat2030
luiy's insight:

Organization models --- > Internet --> “wirearchy” --> nature’s model of self-organizing, self-adapting, evolving complex systems

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Olivier Auber's comment, May 29, 2013 5:19 AM
In fact, the Internet as we know it, is also hierarchical, due to its silos and protocols.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8c0sX6j5D_c
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What facebook knows about you | #dataawareness

A couple of months ago the Austrian law student Max Schrems asked facebook to send him all their data stored about him. All Europeans have a right to do this...
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Digital literacy practices and their layered multiplicity

Digital literacy practices and their layered multiplicity | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
(2012). Digital literacy practices and their layered multiplicity. Educational Media International: Vol. 49, No. 4, pp. 289-301. doi: 10.1080/09523987.2012.741199

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
luiy's insight:
AbstractSuccess in educational programmes often depends on learners being able to negotiate and manage a variety of digital literacy practices commensurate with the literacy demands of their course. This paper reports on preliminary findings of a multi-method PhD study which examines the digital literacy practices arising when an adult learner in a UK college completes writing assignments for her course. It explores whether she uses digital tools agentively and decisively in her personal life, in order to transform her classroom practice. Data show that mobilising personal digital literacy practices into classroom-based literacy events allows learners to successfully make the link between their own everyday digital literacy practices and the requirements of their course. It is argued that a “social practice” approach to digital literacies, along with actor-network theory sensibilities, allows researchers to observe the sensitivity of classroom-based digital literacy events to the layered multiplicity of their contexts.Keywordsdigital literacies, new literacy studies, multimodality, actor-network theory
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Juan Carlos Mojica's curator insight, May 30, 2013 7:21 PM

Un interesante artículo sobre la alfabetización digital.

 

Carmenne K. Thapliyal's curator insight, June 11, 2013 5:11 AM

The article is free, written by Ibrar Bhatt from the University of Leeds

Ness Crouch's curator insight, July 3, 2013 4:48 PM

Insightful read. 

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Knowledge, Networks and Nations: Global scientific collaboration in the 21st century | #CI #SNA #openscience

luiy's insight:

Knowledge, Networks and Nations surveys the global scientific landscape in 2011, noting the shift to an increasingly multipolar world underpinned by the rise of new scientific powers such as China, India and Brazil; as well as the emergence of scientific nations in the Middle East, South-East Asia and North Africa. The scientific world is also becoming more interconnected, with international collaboration on the rise. Over a third of all articles published in international journals are internationally collaborative, up from a quarter 15 years ago.

 

Collaboration is increasing for a variety of reasons. Enabling factors such as advances in communication technology and cheaper travel have played a part, but the primary driver of most collaboration is individual scientists. In seeking to work with the best of their peers and to gain access to complementary resources, equipment and knowledge, researchers fundamentally enhance the quality and improve the efficiency of their work.

Today collaboration has never been more important. With human society facing a number of wide-ranging and interlinked ‘global challenges’ such as climate change, food security, energy security and infectious disease, international scientific collaboration is essential if we are to have any chance of addressing the causes, or dealing with the impacts, of these problems. Through a few selected case studies, we examine the achievements of some of the current efforts to tackle these challenges, discuss problems they have faced, and highlight important lessons their experience has to offer similar initiatives.

The report makes 5 major recommendations:

Support for international science should be maintained and strengthenedInternationally collaborative science should be encouraged, supported and facilitatedNational and international strategies for science are required to address global challengesInternational capacity building is crucial to ensure that the impacts of scientific research are shared globallyBetter indicators are required in order to properly evaluate global science
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Stats about mobile usage in the world / kevin kelly: Who da thunk a decade ago? ...


Via Alessio Erioli
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[ Interesting -- > stats about mobile usage in the world ]

 

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Mobile-broadband subscriptions have climbed
from 268 million in 2007 to 2.1 billion in 2013. This
reflects an average annual growth rate of 40%,
making mobile broadband the most dynamic ICT
market.
In developing countries, the number of mobilebroadband subscriptions more than doubled from
2011 to 2013 (from 472 million to 1.16 billion) and
surpassed those in developed countries in 2013.
Africa is the region with the highest growth rates
over the past three years and mobile-broadband
penetration has increased from 2% in 2010 to 11%
in 2013.

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Review of Social media as #surveillance: Rethinking visibility in a converging world | #privacy #dataawareness

Review of Social media as #surveillance: Rethinking visibility in a converging world | #privacy #dataawareness | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Review of Social media as surveillance: Rethinking visibility in a converging world
luiy's insight:

Social media platforms, like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube, have become “information warehouses”, processing, storing, and analyzing a wide range of personal, communication and usage behavior data. Daniel Trottier’s book Social media as surveillance is a great resource for readers to understand social media surveillance at the interpersonal or institutional levels, where “surveillance” has been conducted by individuals, companies, or the government agencies in the virtual world.

 

This book discusses risks posed by social media surveillance for information users far beyond privacy concerns, hence traditional “care and vigilance” is inefficient. Thus, attempts to manage individual or institutional online presence are significantly complicated by social media. For example, Facebook friends routinely expose each other, and such information transfers from one context to another, even though the “targets” say nothing about themselves.

 

Social media as surveillance presents empirical research with a range of personal and professional social media users (such as individuals, institutions, marketers, and police agencies). Using Facebook as a case study, Trottier describes rapidly growing multi–purpose social media monitoring practices. Such scrutiny activities augment one another and lead to a quick spread of online information (visibility), which is vital for new sociality and power relations.

 

Trottier’s research collects data through detailed interviews with interested parties, such as students, university employees, businesses owners, and police. These interviewees not only reveal how social media is used as surveillance tools, but also discover what is happening and what people think might be happening now. The book gives an insight into both the positive and the negative sides of the social media surveillance issue, as well as some early warnings to future developments.

 

Trottier examines four different aspects of surveillance: interpersonal surveillance (through which people monitor each other); institutional surveillance (through which institutions,i.e., universities or employers, watch over their students or employees); market surveillance (through which businesses track their customers, potential customers, or even random Web surfers) and policing surveillance (through which authorities might spy on technically anything).

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An introduction to Collective Intelligence. #COINs #MAS #agents

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This paper surveys the emerging science of how to design a “COllective INtelligence” (COIN). A COIN is a large multi-agent system where:


i) There is little to no centralized communication or control.
ii) There is a provided world utility function that rates the possible histories of thefull system.


In particular, we are interested in COINs in which each agent runs a reinforcement learning (RL) algorithm. The conventional approach to designing large distributed systems to optimize a world utility does not use agents running RL algorithms. Rather, that approach begins with explicit modeling of the dynamicsof the overall system, followed by detailed hand-tuning of the interactions betweenthe components to ensure that they “cooperate” as far as the world utility is concerned. This approach is labor-intensive, often results in highly nonrobust systems,and usually results in design techniques that have limited applicability.

In contrast, we wish to solve the COIN design problem implicitly, via the “adaptive”character of the RL algorithms of each of the agents. This approach introduces anentirely new, profound design problem:

 

Assuming the RL algorithms are able toachieve high rewards, what reward functions for the individual agents will, whenpursued by those agents, result in high world utility? In other words, what reward functions will best ensure that we do not have phenomena like the tragedy of thecommons, Braess’s paradox, or the liquidity trap?


Although still very young, research specifically concentrating on the COIN design problem has already resulted in successes in artificial domains, in particular in packet-routing, the leader-follower problem, and in variants of Arthur’s El Farol bar problem. It is expected that as it matures and draws upon other disciplines related to COINs, this research will greatly expand the range of tasks addressable by human engineers. Moreover, in addition to drawing on them, such a fully developed science of COIN design may provide much insight into other already established scientific fields, such as economics, game theory, and population biology.

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