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danah boyd: It's Complicated: Teen #Privacy in a Networked Age | @zephoria #cyberculture

danah boyd from Microsoft Research presents "It's Complicated: Teen Privacy in a Networked Age" at FOSI's 7th Annual Conference (#fosi2013) titled 'Connect.S...
luiy's insight:

But as Dr. Boyd sees it, adults are worrying about the wrong things.

Children today, she said, are reacting online largely to social changes that have taken place off line.

 

“Children’s ability to roam has basically been destroyed,” Dr. Boyd said in her office at Microsoft, where a view of the Boston skyline is echoed in the towers of books on her shelves, desk and floor. “Letting your child out to bike around the neighborhood is seen as terrifying now, even though by all measures, life is safer for kids today.”

Children naturally congregate on social media sites for the relatively unsupervised conversations, flirtations, immature humor and social exchanges that are the normal stuff of teenage hanging-out, she said.

 

“We need to give kids the freedom to explore and experience things online that might actually help them,” she added. “What scares me is that we don’t want to look at the things that make us uncomfortable. So rather than see what teenagers are showing us online about bullying and suicide and the problems they’re dealing with and using that information to help them, we’re making ourselves blind to it.”

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/22/fashion/danah-boyd-cracking-teenagers-online-codes.html?_r=0

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Networked Privacy by danah boyd | #Surveillance & Society | #Privacy @zephoria

Networked Privacy by danah boyd | #Surveillance & Society | #Privacy @zephoria | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Networked Privacy
luiy's insight:

Privacy rhetoric often focuses on the individual (Solove 2008). Computer systems are designed to give individuals control over their “personal” data while legal narratives often speak of individual harm and informed consent by individuals. Models that go beyond the individual often focus on groups (e.g., access- control lists that support bounded entities) or articulated lists of others (e.g., “joint rights” models that focus on multiple defined entities). But what are the implications of privacy in a networked world where boundaries aren’t so coherently defined and when entities aren’t so easily articulated?


Curious about what secrets might be hidden in my DNA, I decided to spit in a tube and turn my DNA over to the genetic testing service 23andMe. What came back was fascinating: hints that my ancestors might have origins that differ from the family narrative, and disease probabilities that suggest that family medical stories are either inaccurate or statistically curious. Through this test, I learned information about myself, but I also learned information about members of my family. Furthermore, by choosing to subject my DNA to this testing process, I didn’t just reveal data about myself; I gave away data that provides insights into my mother, brother, grandparents, and even children that I don’t yet have. I never asked my future grandchildren for permission to offer their data to a scientific database. I made a decision about the privacy of my data that affects numerous people who are implicated but who have no say. And, in doing so, I learned information about them that they may not wish to know, let alone have me know.


Our data—and with it, our privacy—is increasingly networked. What we share about ourselves tells heaps about other people. Sometimes, as with DNA data, we’re linked by immutable factors. In other situations, the connection is social or locational. I can’t even count the number of photos that were taken by strangers with me in the background at the Taj Mahal. And my friends often post photos of me with them without asking my permission. Yet, there’s also a third layer of connection. Our data also provides a probabilistic image of who we are based on comparisons to other people. 

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