e-Xploration
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e-Xploration
antropologiaNet, dataviz, collective intelligence, algorithms, social learning, social change, digital humanities
Curated by luiy
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Rescooped by luiy from Era Digital - um olhar ciberantropológico
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Creeping #Connectivity: #Work and Life in a Hyper-Connected World | #socialchange

Creeping #Connectivity: #Work and Life in a Hyper-Connected World | #socialchange | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
It's 10:30 PM on a Sunday night. I've finished folding our laundry and just started the dishwasher. As on most Sundays, S and I just finished ...

Via Adelina Silva
luiy's insight:

The idea of a standard workday began to take root during the American Industrial Revolution, when more people moved away from agricultural jobs and looked to factories for employment. While we might complain of having had a “long” day today, early factory workers had workdays that ranged anywhere between 10 – 16 hours six days a week. This practice persisted into the early 20th-century; workdays varied across industries and were set by the employer until the eight-hour-day was won by different union groups for their trades. Their efforts were aided by the dire state of the country during the Great Depression: In 1933 in an effort to jump start the economy, FDR sought the means to regulate industry and passed the National Industrial Recovery Act. Believing that unchecked competition had helped create conditions that led to the Great Depression, Roosevelt sought limited regulation, support for trade groups, and worker’s rights (shorter working hours, better working conditions, minimum pay rates, etc.) He believed that these items would help pull the country out of the downward slide that threatened to persist indefinitely if left unchecked.

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Rescooped by luiy from E-Learning-Inclusivo (Mashup)
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The #changing nature of work | Harold Jarche | #sharing

The #changing nature of work | Harold Jarche | #sharing | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via juandoming
luiy's insight:

First of all, it is becoming obvious that the fundamental nature of work is changing as we transition into a post-job economy. The major driver of this change is the automation of procedural work, especially through software, but increasingly with robots. The drivers behind the post-job economy are also changing our work structures. Organizations will need to become more networked, not just with information technology, but how knowledge workers create, use, and share knowledge. This new workplace also will require different leadership that emerges from the network and temporarily assumes control, until new leadership is required. Giving up control will be a major challenge for anyone used to the old ways of work. An important part of leadership will be to ensure that knowledge is shared. But moving to a knowledge-sharing organizational structure will be difficult, because of the knowledge sharing paradox; which is that the more control is exerted, the less knowledge is shared. All of these challenges need to be addressed, and rather quickly, as software continues to eat jobs, and income disparities get wider.

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Rescooped by luiy from Work Futures
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Re-Imagining Work | #SocialChange

Re-Imagining Work | #SocialChange | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

How can we get people more engaged, more productive, and happier at work? Is technology part of the problem - and could it also be part of the solution?

Dave Coplin, Chief Envisioning Officer at Microsoft, imagines what might be possible if more organisations embraced the full, empowering potential of technology and encouraged a truly open, collaborative and flexible working culture.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Kenneth Brown's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:10 PM

As a learning professional, we know that work is learning.  So when we design learning content or design learning cohorts we have to remind  ourselves to create that cognitive space, allow people to think.  Then nudge them to share, connect and inspire.