e-Xploration
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e-Xploration
antropologiaNet, dataviz, collective intelligence, algorithms, social learning, social change, digital humanities
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Fighting #Censorship with #ProtonMail Encrypted Email Over Tor - ProtonMail Blog - #privacy 

Fighting #Censorship with #ProtonMail Encrypted Email Over Tor - ProtonMail Blog - #privacy  | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

In the past two years, ProtonMail has grown enormously, especially after the recent US election, and today we are the world’s largest encrypted email service with over 2 million users. We have come a long way since our user community initially crowdfunded the project. 


ProtonMail today is much larger in scope than what was originally envisioned when our founding team met at CERN in 2013. As ProtonMail has evolved, the world has also been changing around us. 


Civil liberties have been increasingly restricted in all corners of the globe. Even Western democracies such as the US have not been immune to this trend, which is most starkly illustrated by the forced enlistment of US tech companies into the US surveillance apparatus. 


In fact, we have reached the point where it simply not possible to run a privacy and security focused service in the US or in the UK. At the same time, the stakes are also higher than ever before. As ProtonMail has grown, we have become increasingly aware of our role as a tool for freedom of speech, and in particular for investigative journalism. 


Last fall, we were invited to the 2nd Asian Investigative Journalism Conference and were able to get a firsthand look at the importance of tools like ProtonMail in the field.

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Social Media and the ‘Spiral of Silence’ | #surveillance #privacy

Social Media and the ‘Spiral of Silence’ | #surveillance #privacy | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Facebook, Twitter, and other platforms did not provide new outlets for the discussion of the Snowden-NSA revelations. People who thought their social media friends disagreed with them were less likely to discuss the issues in person and online.
luiy's insight:

An informed citizenry depends on people’s exposure to information on important political issues and on their willingness to discuss these issues with those around them. The rise of social media, such as Facebook and Twitter, has introduced new spaces where political discussion and debate can take place. This report explores the degree to which social media affects a long-established human attribute—that those who think they hold minority opinions often self-censor, failing to speak out for fear of ostracism or ridicule. It is called the “spiral of silence.”

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Researchers Find and Decode the #SpyTools Governments Use to Hijack Phones | #privacy #surveillance

Researchers Find and Decode the #SpyTools Governments Use to Hijack Phones | #privacy #surveillance | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Newly uncovered components of a digital surveillance tool used by more than 60 governments worldwide provide a rare glimpse at the extensive ways law enforcement and intelligence agencies use the tool to surreptitiously record and steal data from mobile phones.

luiy's insight:

The modules, made by the Italian company Hacking Team, were uncovered by researchers working independently of each other at Kaspersky Lab in Russia and the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs in Canada, who say the findings provide great insight into the trade craft behind Hacking Team’s tools.

 

The new components target Android, iOS, Windows Mobile, and BlackBerry users and are part of Hacking Team’s larger suite of tools used for targeting desktop computers and laptops. But the iOS and Android modules provide cops and spooks with a robust menu of features to give them complete dominion over targeted phones.

 

They allow, for example, for covert collection of emails, text messages, call history and address books, and they can be used to log keystrokes and obtain search history data. They can take screenshots, record audio from the phones to monitor calls or ambient conversations, hijack the phone’s camera to snap pictures or piggyback on the phone’s GPS system to monitor the user’s location. The Android version can also enable the phone’s Wi-Fi function to siphon data from the phone wirelessly instead of using the cell network to transmit it. The latter would incur data charges and raise the phone owner’s suspicion.

 

“Secretly activating the microphone and taking regular camera shots provides constant surveillance of the target—which is much more powerful than traditional cloak and dagger operations,” notes Kaspersky researcher Sergey Golovanov in a blog post about the findings.

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Spy Toolkit: The Coolest Espionage Gadgets Throughout #History | #surveillance

Spy Toolkit: The Coolest Espionage Gadgets Throughout #History | #surveillance | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Spy gadgetry is constantly evolving, but history is chock-full of sweet espionage gizmos.
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The Internet is rising up in protest on February 11th | #actions #post #shared #awareness

The Internet is rising up in protest on February 11th | #actions #post #shared #awareness | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Thousands of websites are planning a massive online protest against surveillance on February 11th.
luiy's insight:

ACTIONS.

 

Post a comment with a link to every NSA-related story. Make and share a meme. Build a website. Organize an event.

Then tell us about it so we can spread the word.

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Timeline of #NSA Domestic Spying 1952-2014 | #surveillance #privacy

Timeline of #NSA Domestic Spying 1952-2014 | #surveillance #privacy | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
All of the evidence found in this timeline can also be found in the Summary of Evidence we submitted to the court in Jewel v. National Security Agency (NSA).
luiy's insight:

The timeline also includes documents leaked by the Guardian in June 2013 that confirmed the domestic spying by the NSA. The documents range from a Top Secret Court Order by the secret court overseeing the spying, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA Court), to a working draft of an NSA Inspector General report detailing the history of the program. The "NSA Inspectors General Reports" tab consists of one of three documents: a July 10, 2009 report written by Inspectors General of the Department of Justice (DOJ), NSA, Department of Defense (DOD), Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence; an internal working draft NSA Inspector General report leaked by the Guardian on June 27, 2013; and, an "End to End Review" of the Section 215 program conducted by the NSA for the FISA Court. For a short description of the people involved in the spying you can look at our Profiles page, which includes many of the key characters from the NSA Domestic Spying program.

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Big Brother EXISTE... et tout le monde se fout de la menace : les raisons de notre étrange anesthésie collective

Big Brother EXISTE... et tout le monde se fout de la menace : les raisons de notre étrange anesthésie collective | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Alors que la construction par la NSA d'un "super-ordinateur" capable de briser n'importe quel code vient d'être révélée, les opinions publiques semblent de moins en moins se préoccuper de la protection de leur vie privée. Une indifférence qui n'est pas sans rappeler celle des masses apathiques décrites dans "1984" par Georges Orwell. ...

 

 


Via Alcofribas, association concert urbain, Lockall
luiy's insight:

Thiébaut Devergranne : Le principal problème en la matière est que des systèmes comme PRISM ne portent pas directement et physiquement atteinte aux personnes qui en sont victimes. Lorsque les services de renseignements connectent de façon massive, quasi-totale, nos données personnelles (sites fréquentés, communications…) nous ne le voyons pas, ne le sentons pas, ni ne l'entendons. Une personne pourra éventuellement s'en apercevoir en bout de course, en se voyant notamment refuser sans raisons particulières un poste important (haute fonction publique, nucléaire, sécurité…). En dehors de ce type d'événement, le phénomène reste toutefois entièrement imperceptible.


Read more at http://www.atlantico.fr/decryptage/big-brother-existe%E2%80%A6-et-tout-monde-se-fout-menace-raisons-notre-etrange-anesthesie-collective-michel-nesterenko-thiebaut-devergra-943598.html#dEdRDeX4Oj6ClajJ.99

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Living in a #surveillance state: Mikko Hypponen I #privacy

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TED...
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Thanks, Snowden! Now All The Major Tech Companies Reveal How Often They Give Data To Government | #PRISM

Thanks, Snowden! Now All The Major Tech Companies Reveal How Often They Give Data To Government | #PRISM | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
An infographic to compare how often tech companies get government search queries and how many of their users are affected.
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#NSA director set to lose powers over US cyber warfare and defence | #privacy #surveillance

#NSA director set to lose powers over US cyber warfare and defence | #privacy #surveillance | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
The NSA director could soon lose power over Cyber Command, the US unit in charge of cyber warfare and defence, a source familiar with discussions has...

Via Pierre Levy
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Smartdrones - All news #drones

Smartdrones - All news #drones | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Toute l'actualité des drones et du vol en immersion
luiy's insight:

- Surveillance

- Drones and regulations

- Control stations

- Drones and journalism

- Crafts

- Media Manufacturers

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Interactive timeline of #PRISM scandal with a dynamic network graph | #dataviz #SNA_indatcom

Interactive timeline of #PRISM scandal with a dynamic network graph | #dataviz #SNA_indatcom | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
This is an interactive timeline of events about the Prism scandal, chronicled by selected media in online news articles, giving a summarized view of events as they unfolded.
luiy's insight:

It’s intended as a parody of a NSA software to track people and analyze their metadata. It consists of these parts:


•the chronological order of articles, visualized as a timeline,
•a network of people, places and organizations that appear in the articles,
•geographic information that the articles refer to, and
•a bar graph showing wordcounts of interesting words, associated with the main theme.


Note: it won't work in IE.

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Predict Crime | Predictive Policing Software | PredPol

Predict Crime | Predictive Policing Software | PredPol | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

PredPol, "Predictive Policing Software", is an policing technology that helps law enforcement predict and prevent crime. 

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Which Countries Are Banning Phone Surveillance Statistics? | #privacy #surveillance

Which Countries Are Banning Phone Surveillance Statistics? | #privacy #surveillance | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Vodafone lifts the lid on mobile monitoring in 27 countries
luiy's insight:

Vodafone, one of the world's largest mobile phone groups, has revealed the existence of secret wires that allow government agencies to listen to all conversations on its networks, saying they are widely used in some of the 29 countries in which it operates in Europe and beyond.

 

The company has broken its silence on government surveillance in order to push back against the increasingly widespread use of phone and broadband networks to spy on citizens, and will publish its first Law Enforcement Disclosure Report on Friday. At 40,000 words, it is the most comprehensive survey yet of how governments monitor the conversations and whereabouts of their people.

 

The company said wires had been connected directly to its network and those of other telecoms groups, allowing agencies to listen to or record live conversations and, in certain cases, track the whereabouts of a customer. Privacy campaigners said the revelations were a "nightmare scenario" that confirmed their worst fears on the extent of snooping.

 

In Albania, Egypt, Hungary, India, Malta, Qatar, Romania, South Africa and Turkey, it is unlawful to disclose any information related to wiretapping or interception of the content of phone calls and messages including whether such capabilities exist.

 

http://www.theguardian.com/business/2014/jun/06/vodafone-reveals-secret-wires-allowing-state-surveillance

 

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/europe/2014/06/vodafone-reveals-network-spying-states-201466134726119937.html

 

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#NSA files decoded: Edward Snowden's #surveillance revelations explained | #ddj

#NSA files decoded: Edward Snowden's #surveillance revelations explained | #ddj | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
In the last five months, the NSA's surveillance practices have been revealed to be a massive international operation, staggering in scope. But how do all of the NSA's programmes fit together – and what does it mean for you?
luiy's insight:

Faced with growing public and political concern over the quantities of data it is collecting, the NSA has sought to reassure people, arguing that it collected only a tiny proportion of the world’s internet traffic, roughly equivalent to a “dime on a basketball court”. But in reality, that is still a huge amount of data. The Library of Congress, one of the biggest libraries in the world, gathers 5 terabytes a month. The NSA sucks up much, much more.

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Here's how we take back the Internet | #Snowden #privacy #surveillance

Here's how we take back the Internet | #Snowden #privacy #surveillance | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Appearing by telepresence robot, Edward Snowden speaks at TED2014 about surveillance and Internet freedom. The right to data privacy, he suggests, is not a partisan issue, but requires a fundamental rethink of the role of the internet in our lives — and the laws that protect it. "Your rights matter,” he says, "because you never know when you're going to need them." Chris Anderson interviews, with special guest Tim Berners-Lee.

luiy's insight:

Why you should listen

 

Edward Snowden was just about to turn 28 when his face was suddenly splashed across every major newspaper in the US. In the summer of 2013 The Guardianpublished a series of leaked documents about the American National Security Agency (NSA), starting with an article about a secret court order demanding American phone records from Verizon, followed by an article on the NSA's top-secret Prism program, said to be accessing user data from Google, Apple and Facebook.

 

It wasn't long before Snowden came forward as the source, revealing that he had carefully planned the leak, copying documents when he was working as a contractor for the NSA. "I understand that I will be made to suffer for my actions," he said at the time, but "I will be satisfied if the federation of secret law, unequal pardon and irresistible executive powers that rule the world that I love are revealed even for an instant." Snowden's actions have led to a global debate on the relationship between national security and online privacy. His leaks continue to have a lasting impact on the American public's view of the government, and has encouraged media scrutiny on the NSA.

 

Snowden had coordinated the leak with journalist Glenn Greenwald and filmmaker Laura Poitras from Hong Kong; after he revealed his identity, he fled and ended up in Moscow. Under charges of espionage by the American government, Snowden remains in Russia in temporary asylum.

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This Beautiful Map of the Internet Is Insanely Detailed | #NSA #surveillance #privacy

This Beautiful Map of the Internet Is Insanely Detailed | #NSA #surveillance #privacy | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Visualizing the internet is almost as difficult as ignoring trolls, but that didn't stop Jay Jason Simons from having a damn good try. The result is this beautiful and insanely detailed map.
luiy's insight:

This poster includes one full map of the internet, 4 mini maps showcasing NSA surveillance, most used social networks, most used internet browser, and worldwide internet penetration, list of Alexa Top 500 websites, a quick timeline of the Internet History, top software companies and much more!

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Lutte contre la #surveillance: les #hackers doivent passer de la technique au #politique

Lutte contre la #surveillance: les #hackers doivent passer de la technique au #politique | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
«On est dans cette violence émotionnelle du moment où la réalité est devant nos yeux.

Via Patrick W., Pascal Paul
luiy's insight:
L'ébauche d'un mouvement civil

Une «internationale hacker» en gestation? Voire. La centralisation n'est pas le trait culturel dominant du mouvement —bien au contraire. Et le discours «classe contre classe», ou «camp contre camp», n'est pas sans soulever des objections.

 

«La vision politique de cette communauté est forte, nécessaire, et utile, mais il n'y a pas de sens de la nuance, et ce n'est pas sain, déplore Nadim Kobeissi, le principal développeur du chat chiffré Cryptocat. On peut améliorer la vie privée des utilisateurs sans pour autant définir un ennemi, les “bons” contre les “méchants”, ou se poser en super-héros. Il y a quelque chose d'un peu tribal dans tout ça.»


Pragmatisme versus idéologie: la tension, en vérité, traverse depuis longtemps le mouvement hacker. Ce que l'affaire Snowden pourrait avoir changé en profondeur, c'est la manière dont il se perçoit —comme le noyau dur d'un mouvement plus vaste de défense de la vie privée et des libertés en ligne.

 

«En tant que techniciens, en tant que hackers, on doit travailler avec les législateurs, avec les groupes de pression, pour avoir plus d'impact politique», avance ainsi Jurre Van Bergen. Reste à en trouver les moyens. Car si le CCC joue depuis longtemps un rôle d'expert auprès des autorités allemandes [2], et si les associations de défense des libertés en ligne tirent régulièrement la sonnette d'alarme, tout le monde ne joue pas dans la même catégorie. Un vrai problème en Europe, selon Chris Soghoian:

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Has #BigData Made Anonymity Impossible? I #databrokers #privacy #awareness

Has #BigData Made Anonymity Impossible? I #databrokers #privacy #awareness | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
As digital data expands, anonymity may become a mathematical impossibility.
luiy's insight:

Yet these data brokers today are considered somewhat old-fashioned compared with Internet companies like Facebook, which have automated the collection of personal information so it can be done in real time. According to its financial filings at the time of its IPO, Facebook stores around 111 megabytes of photos and videos for each of its users, who now number more than a billion.

 

That’s 100 petabytes of personal information right there. In some European legal cases, plaintiffs have learned that Facebook’s records of their interactions with the site—including text messages, things they “liked,” and addresses of computers they used—run to 800 printed pages, adding up to another few megabytes per user.

 

In a step that’s worrisome to digital-privacy advocates, offline and online data sets are now being connected to help marketers target advertisements more precisely. In February, Facebook announced a deal with Acxiom and other data brokers to merge their data, linking real-world activities to those on the web. At a March investor meeting, Acxiom’s chief science officer claimed that its data could now be linked to 90% of U.S. social profiles.

 

Such data sets are often portrayed as having been “anonymized” in some way, but the more data they involve, the less like that is to be actually true. Mobile-phone companies, for instance, record users’ locations, strip out the phone numbers, and sell aggregate data sets to merchants or others interested in people’s movements.

MIT researchers Yves-Alexandre de Montjoye and César A. Hidalgo have shown that even when such location data is anonymous, just four different data points about a phone’s position can usually link the phone to a unique person.

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C.I.A. Collects Global Data on Transfers of Money I #surveillance #privacy

C.I.A. Collects Global Data on Transfers of Money I #surveillance #privacy | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
The agency is secretly collecting bulk records of international money transfers, under the same law that the National Security Agency uses for its phone record database, according to government officials.
luiy's insight:

The C.I.A. financial records program, which the officials said was authorized by provisions in the Patriot Act and overseen by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, offers evidence that the extent of government data collection programs is not fully known and that the national debate over privacy and security may be incomplete.

 

Some details of the C.I.A. program were not clear. But it was confirmed by several current and former officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the matter is classified.

The data does not include purely domestic transfers or bank-to-bank transactions, several officials said. Another, while not acknowledging the program, suggested that the surveillance court had imposed rules withholding the identities of any Americans from the data the C.I.A. sees, requiring a tie to a terrorist organization before a search may be run, and mandating that the data be discarded after a certain number of years. The court has imposed several similar rules on the N.S.A. call logs program.

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From the NSA to OKCupid, 5 Algorithms That Rule Your World | #algorithms

From the NSA to OKCupid, 5 Algorithms That Rule Your World | #algorithms | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
From the NSA to OKCupid.

Via Pierre Levy
luiy's insight:

1. The NSA’s Surveillance Algorithm

The NSA’s surveillance programs work, or so they claim, by collecting metadata: not the content of your phone calls and emails, but their length, who they connect you to, and when they happen.

 

2. Encryption Algorithms

Another way to combat surveillance is to confuse the algorithms—turning their own capabilities against them. Encryption algorithms encode your data, using a secret formula to turn it into an unreadable mass that entities like the NSA can’t process. That’s how post-PRISM services like Silent Circle and Least Authority protect their users’ phone calls and messages from snooping. But encryption algorithms have a very long history.

 

3. Google Search

If you’ve ever had Google fill in the rest of your search text like a mind-reader, you’ve also experienced an algorithm at work. Compounding what you’ve previously searched with what other users search for every day, Google’s algorithms can predict what you’re looking for with a frightening degree of accuracy.

 

4. High-Frequency Trading Algorithms

In the heyday of Wall Street, traders shouted across exchange floors to buy and sell stocks. These days, it’s a whole lot quieter—around 50 percent of trading is done by firms specializing in “high-frequency trading” (HFT), which refers to rapid-fire share buys and sells carried out by computer programs rather than humans. Hedge funds that specialize in HFT develop proprietary algorithms to determine what they buy and sell and when, then the programs carry out those instructions in milli- or microseconds. 

 

5. OKCupid

Algorithms influence even our intimate relationships. The now-iconic surveys of OKCupid, the question-and-answer sessions the dating site spews out to help match its users, provide the data for the site’s compatibility algorithms.

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Networked Privacy by danah boyd | #Surveillance & Society | #Privacy @zephoria

Networked Privacy by danah boyd | #Surveillance & Society | #Privacy @zephoria | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Networked Privacy
luiy's insight:

Privacy rhetoric often focuses on the individual (Solove 2008). Computer systems are designed to give individuals control over their “personal” data while legal narratives often speak of individual harm and informed consent by individuals. Models that go beyond the individual often focus on groups (e.g., access- control lists that support bounded entities) or articulated lists of others (e.g., “joint rights” models that focus on multiple defined entities). But what are the implications of privacy in a networked world where boundaries aren’t so coherently defined and when entities aren’t so easily articulated?


Curious about what secrets might be hidden in my DNA, I decided to spit in a tube and turn my DNA over to the genetic testing service 23andMe. What came back was fascinating: hints that my ancestors might have origins that differ from the family narrative, and disease probabilities that suggest that family medical stories are either inaccurate or statistically curious. Through this test, I learned information about myself, but I also learned information about members of my family. Furthermore, by choosing to subject my DNA to this testing process, I didn’t just reveal data about myself; I gave away data that provides insights into my mother, brother, grandparents, and even children that I don’t yet have. I never asked my future grandchildren for permission to offer their data to a scientific database. I made a decision about the privacy of my data that affects numerous people who are implicated but who have no say. And, in doing so, I learned information about them that they may not wish to know, let alone have me know.


Our data—and with it, our privacy—is increasingly networked. What we share about ourselves tells heaps about other people. Sometimes, as with DNA data, we’re linked by immutable factors. In other situations, the connection is social or locational. I can’t even count the number of photos that were taken by strangers with me in the background at the Taj Mahal. And my friends often post photos of me with them without asking my permission. Yet, there’s also a third layer of connection. Our data also provides a probabilistic image of who we are based on comparisons to other people. 

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Data privacy. Data brokers and I.. | #privacy #dataAwareness

Data privacy. Data brokers and I.. | #privacy #dataAwareness | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Data privacy. Data brokers and I.., by Luiy: My data, my info, my privacy and the databrokers
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Surveillance and Digital Dualism: A Reflection on “Theorizing the Web” (#TtW13) | Technophilosophy

Surveillance and Digital Dualism: A Reflection on “Theorizing the Web” (#TtW13) | Technophilosophy | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

One example is collective intelligence according to philosopher Pierre Lévy (@plevy), whose ideas have, early on, orientated the French approach towards the logic of digital cooperation; the economy of contribution according to philosopher Bernard Stiegler, which is integrated into a global vision of the current hyper-industrial political economy and develops (in its way) this logic of cooperation; the psychological experience of new technologies according to psychoanalyst Serge Tisseron, who develops an empathic psychology of the relationship with machines but based on the extremely problematic concept of the ‘virtual’; the new opportunities of Internet democracy according to sociologist Dominique Cardon, in opposition to the demonization of the internet of which the media are so fond; or, in the younger generation, the new hybrid forms of sociability introduced by the digital liaisons according to the sociologist Antonio A. Casilli (@bodyspacesoc), the new ontology that emerges from the architecture of the Web according to Alexandre Monnin (@aamonnz) or the new structures of perception introduced by digital ontophany into the phenomeno-technological approach that I suggest (1).

I’m not saying that French thinkers are not interested in the issue of surveillance as it may be raised again or in a new way due to Internet technologies. What I’m saying is that it’s not what concerns them the most with regard to the internet, even if young philosophers such as Cléo Collomb (@CleoCollomb) are currently working on the ‘digital traces’ we leave behind us in the era of Big Data. Moreover, when discussing this with Lev Manovich (@manovich) during the After Party at Slattery’s Pub, I had the feeling that I was right to consider the theme of surveillance as excessive. Manovich was telling me that, according to him, this could be explained by the importance given to the individual and to ‘privacy’ in the culture of English speaking countries. For my part, I was thinking that a country that dominates the world like the United States does, and is so focused on performance, can only be extremely concerned about all forms of power that exist between individuals. But these reflections may be too simplistic in addressing this issue.

By the way, thanks to Theorizing the Web 2013, I am now more aware of surveillance issues in digital media and I even agree on the assholishness of Google Glass. 

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