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The #CollectiveIntelligence Blog - Exploring new models of #collaboration and network organization

The #CollectiveIntelligence Blog - Exploring new models of #collaboration and network organization | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Exploring new models of collaboration and network organization

Via Spaceweaver
luiy's insight:

Nature can inspire us to explore emerging models of interaction that will help to better understand patterns of collective intelligence in human groups. Steven Johnson, in his book “Emerging Systems” (2001), masterfully demonstrates how that connection (called Biomimicry or biomimetics) is full of metaphors. The Web Ask Nature, the Biomimicry Institute, brings together hundreds of examples of such associations.

 

In a previous post I mentioned that one of the things I liked about the Collective Intelligence Conference held at MIT in April 2012 was to listen to Deborah Gordon (Stanford) and Ian Couzin (Princeton), two behavioral biologists, who focused on the study of the patterns of behavior of animals in their natural habitats. They are not “biologists” in its classical sense but work as multidisciplinary groups that are making increasing use of mathematics and computer science as well as tracking and geolocation devices to investigate the collective behavior of swarms or “Swarm Intelligence“, a branch of artificial intelligence based on the collective behavior of decentralized and self-organized systems. 

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Spaceweaver's curator insight, May 21, 1:10 PM

Looks an interesting blog

Rescooped by luiy from Homo Agilis (Collective Intelligence, Agility and Sustainability : The Future is already here)
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Building like termites: robots show #collectiveintelligence | #stigmergy

Building like termites: robots show #collectiveintelligence | #stigmergy | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via Claude Emond
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The project sought to borrow the concept of "stigmergy" from the natural world, in which behaviour is co-ordinated from information left in the environment. Termites take material to a location, at which they attempt to deposit it. If the location is already filled, they are trained to add their cargo to the next available space. The researchers developed an algorithm which generates a series of low-level rules for the robots to follow. 

"We're not going to Mars anytime soon, but a more medium-term application might be to use similar robots in flood zones to build levees out of sandbags," said lead author Dr Justin Werfel, who was summarising the team's research at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

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#Stigmergic dimensions of Online Creative Interaction | #algorithms #memes

#Stigmergic dimensions of Online Creative Interaction | #algorithms #memes | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
This paper examines the stigmergic dimensions of online interactive creativity through the lens of Picbreeder. Picbreeder is a web-based system for collaborative interactive evolution of images. Th...
luiy's insight:

Creativity as stigmergy

 

If stigmergy happens when an agent’s effect on the environment “stimulates and guides” the work of others, then certainly creative communities must be subject to some kind of stigmergy. No creative endeavor exists in a vac- uum, and being inspired and stimulated by the work of another is so fundamental to creative communities of artists, academics, engineers, etc., that it is difficult to imagine these communities functioning any other way.

 

Closely related to the concept of stigmergy is the concept of self-organization. The reason that it is remarkable that one user’s work stimulates another’s is the emergence of patterns that appear as if that they could be centrally controlled. Often, a mix of direct communication and con- trol as well as emergent properties of the social structure give rise to collaborative creative activities. Fig. 4 suggests an informal ordering of the amount direct communication and coordination involved in several different types of creative processes, with emergent creative processes on the left end, and highly coordinated processes on the right

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