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#BIGDATA SOCIETY: Age of Reputation or Age of Discrimination? | #controverses #privacy

#BIGDATA SOCIETY: Age of Reputation or Age of Discrimination? | #controverses #privacy | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

Like every technology, Big Data has some side effects. Even if you are not concerned about losing your privacy, you should be worried about one thing: discrimination. A typical application of Big Data is to distinguish different kinds of people: terrorists from normal people, good from bad insurance risks, honest tax payers from those who don't declare all income ... You may ask, isn't that a good thing? Maybe on average it is, but what if you are wrongly classified? Have you checked the information collected by the Internet about your name or gone through the list of pictures google stores about you? Even more scary than how much is known about you is the fact that there is quite some information in between which does not fit. So, what if you are stopped by border control, just because you have a similar name as a criminal suspect? If so, you might have been traumatized for quite some time.

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Mapping Internet #Governance | #cyberdemocracy #SNA

Mapping Internet #Governance | #cyberdemocracy #SNA | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
A collaborative map of processes that shape the evolution of the Internet
luiy's insight:

Already a pressing global issue, internet governance debates are taking place across a range of different fora often referred to as an ecosystem. With the revelations of mass government surveillance, the frequency, intensity, and stakes of internet governance debates have heightened in the last year and this trend promises to continue. At the core of such debates is the future of fundamental rights, such as freedom of expression, privacy, access to knowledge, and access to affordable internet, but also how to decision-making process can become more open, transparent, participatory, accountable, and democratic.

 

Mapping Internet Governance, a collective data compiling and mapping project, traces the relations between the internet governance events, processes, and organizing institutions. The map covers the past 2 years with an effort to better focus civil society advocacy by understanding where main discussions about global internet governance are taking place.

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#Privacy, Anonymity, and #BigData in the Social Sciences | #dh #MOOC

#Privacy, Anonymity, and #BigData in the Social Sciences | #dh #MOOC | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
A recent article suggests that open science may be irreconcilable with anonymous data, requiring a reconsideration of how we protect privacy in educational data.
luiy's insight:

The short version: many people have called for making science more open and transparent by sharing data and posting data openly. This allows researchers to check each other's work and to aggregate smaller datasets into larger ones. One saying that I'm fond of is: "the best use of your dataset is something that someone else will come up with." The problem is that increasingly, all of this data is about us. In education, it's about our demographics, our learning behavior, and our performance. Across the social sciences, it's about our health, our beliefs, and our social connections. Sharing and merging data adds to the risk of disclosing those data. 

 

The article shares a case study of our efforts to strike a balance between anonymity and open science by de-identifying a dataset of learner data from HarvardX and releasing it to the public. In order to de-identify the data to a standard that we thought was reasonably resistant to reidentification efforts, we had to delete some records and blur some variables. If a learner's combination of identifying variables was too unique, we either deleted the record or scrubbed the data to make it look less unique. The result was suitable for release (in our view), but as we looked more closely at the released dataset, it wasn't suitable for science. We scrubbed the data to the point where it was problematically dissimilar from the original dataset. If you do research using our data, you can't be sure if your findings are legitimate or an artifact of de-identification. 

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Which Countries Are Banning Phone Surveillance Statistics? | #privacy #surveillance

Which Countries Are Banning Phone Surveillance Statistics? | #privacy #surveillance | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Vodafone lifts the lid on mobile monitoring in 27 countries
luiy's insight:

Vodafone, one of the world's largest mobile phone groups, has revealed the existence of secret wires that allow government agencies to listen to all conversations on its networks, saying they are widely used in some of the 29 countries in which it operates in Europe and beyond.

 

The company has broken its silence on government surveillance in order to push back against the increasingly widespread use of phone and broadband networks to spy on citizens, and will publish its first Law Enforcement Disclosure Report on Friday. At 40,000 words, it is the most comprehensive survey yet of how governments monitor the conversations and whereabouts of their people.

 

The company said wires had been connected directly to its network and those of other telecoms groups, allowing agencies to listen to or record live conversations and, in certain cases, track the whereabouts of a customer. Privacy campaigners said the revelations were a "nightmare scenario" that confirmed their worst fears on the extent of snooping.

 

In Albania, Egypt, Hungary, India, Malta, Qatar, Romania, South Africa and Turkey, it is unlawful to disclose any information related to wiretapping or interception of the content of phone calls and messages including whether such capabilities exist.

 

http://www.theguardian.com/business/2014/jun/06/vodafone-reveals-secret-wires-allowing-state-surveillance

 

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/europe/2014/06/vodafone-reveals-network-spying-states-201466134726119937.html

 

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Researchers Find and Decode the #SpyTools Governments Use to Hijack Phones | #privacy #surveillance

Researchers Find and Decode the #SpyTools Governments Use to Hijack Phones | #privacy #surveillance | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Newly uncovered components of a digital surveillance tool used by more than 60 governments worldwide provide a rare glimpse at the extensive ways law enforcement and intelligence agencies use the tool to surreptitiously record and steal data from mobile phones.

luiy's insight:

The modules, made by the Italian company Hacking Team, were uncovered by researchers working independently of each other at Kaspersky Lab in Russia and the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs in Canada, who say the findings provide great insight into the trade craft behind Hacking Team’s tools.

 

The new components target Android, iOS, Windows Mobile, and BlackBerry users and are part of Hacking Team’s larger suite of tools used for targeting desktop computers and laptops. But the iOS and Android modules provide cops and spooks with a robust menu of features to give them complete dominion over targeted phones.

 

They allow, for example, for covert collection of emails, text messages, call history and address books, and they can be used to log keystrokes and obtain search history data. They can take screenshots, record audio from the phones to monitor calls or ambient conversations, hijack the phone’s camera to snap pictures or piggyback on the phone’s GPS system to monitor the user’s location. The Android version can also enable the phone’s Wi-Fi function to siphon data from the phone wirelessly instead of using the cell network to transmit it. The latter would incur data charges and raise the phone owner’s suspicion.

 

“Secretly activating the microphone and taking regular camera shots provides constant surveillance of the target—which is much more powerful than traditional cloak and dagger operations,” notes Kaspersky researcher Sergey Golovanov in a blog post about the findings.

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What Will Happen to ‘#BigData’ In Education? | #learning #analytics

What Will Happen to ‘#BigData’ In Education? | #learning #analytics | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Privacy concerns have put the breaks on many efforts to use "big data" in education. Why are people so skittish of education data when other kinds of digital information are readily accessible?

Via Claude Emond, Pierre Levy
luiy's insight:

InBloom’s trajectory has shined a spotlight on the public’s sensitivity around what happens to student data. When it first began as a mammoth ed-tech project in 2011 by the Council of Chief State School Officers, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation called the Shared Learning Infrastructure, the purpose was to provide open-source software to safely organize, pool, and store student data from multiple states and multiple sources in the cloud. That included everything from demographics to attendance to discipline to grades to the detailed, moment-by-moment, data produced by learning analytics programs like Dreambox and Khan Academy. An API — application programming interface — would allow software developers to connect to that data, creating applications that could, at least in theory, be used by any school in the infrastructure.

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Here's how we take back the Internet | #Snowden #privacy #surveillance

Here's how we take back the Internet | #Snowden #privacy #surveillance | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Appearing by telepresence robot, Edward Snowden speaks at TED2014 about surveillance and Internet freedom. The right to data privacy, he suggests, is not a partisan issue, but requires a fundamental rethink of the role of the internet in our lives — and the laws that protect it. "Your rights matter,” he says, "because you never know when you're going to need them." Chris Anderson interviews, with special guest Tim Berners-Lee.

luiy's insight:

Why you should listen

 

Edward Snowden was just about to turn 28 when his face was suddenly splashed across every major newspaper in the US. In the summer of 2013 The Guardianpublished a series of leaked documents about the American National Security Agency (NSA), starting with an article about a secret court order demanding American phone records from Verizon, followed by an article on the NSA's top-secret Prism program, said to be accessing user data from Google, Apple and Facebook.

 

It wasn't long before Snowden came forward as the source, revealing that he had carefully planned the leak, copying documents when he was working as a contractor for the NSA. "I understand that I will be made to suffer for my actions," he said at the time, but "I will be satisfied if the federation of secret law, unequal pardon and irresistible executive powers that rule the world that I love are revealed even for an instant." Snowden's actions have led to a global debate on the relationship between national security and online privacy. His leaks continue to have a lasting impact on the American public's view of the government, and has encouraged media scrutiny on the NSA.

 

Snowden had coordinated the leak with journalist Glenn Greenwald and filmmaker Laura Poitras from Hong Kong; after he revealed his identity, he fled and ended up in Moscow. Under charges of espionage by the American government, Snowden remains in Russia in temporary asylum.

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This Beautiful Map of the Internet Is Insanely Detailed | #NSA #surveillance #privacy

This Beautiful Map of the Internet Is Insanely Detailed | #NSA #surveillance #privacy | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Visualizing the internet is almost as difficult as ignoring trolls, but that didn't stop Jay Jason Simons from having a damn good try. The result is this beautiful and insanely detailed map.
luiy's insight:

This poster includes one full map of the internet, 4 mini maps showcasing NSA surveillance, most used social networks, most used internet browser, and worldwide internet penetration, list of Alexa Top 500 websites, a quick timeline of the Internet History, top software companies and much more!

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Vie privée numérique : Création d'un #Observatoire des Libertés | #privacy

Vie privée numérique : Création d'un #Observatoire des Libertés | #privacy | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Depuis 1978 et la promulgation de la loi Informatiques et Libertés, et 1989 avec la création de Delis (Droits et Libertés face à l'Informatisation de la Société) rien n'avait été fait dans le domaine.

Via Sandrine Mathon
luiy's insight:

Assange, Wikileaks, Bradley Manning puis Edward Snowden et le scandale de la surveillance massive à échelle planétaire de la NSA mais également la (trop?) discrète Loi de Programmation Militaire (LPM) ne doivent pas y être étrangers. Les nouvelles problématiques mises en lumière par l’ère du tout numérique (vie professionnelle et vie privée) contraignent à être de plus en plus vigilants concernant les données personnelles que l’on laisse traîner sur la toile ou la sécurité de nos fichiers stockés sur un quelconque serveur distant ou ordinateur personnel, quand ce ne sont pas les entreprises et gouvernements eux-mêmes qui mènent la traque sur Internet.

Ainsi, associations et syndicats réunissant avocats, universitaires et citoyens engagés ont pris l’initiative de lancer lundi 27 janvier, soit la veille de la journée européenne de la protection des données créée en 2007 (bon timing), l’Observatoire des libertés et du numérique.

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Lutte contre la #surveillance: les #hackers doivent passer de la technique au #politique

Lutte contre la #surveillance: les #hackers doivent passer de la technique au #politique | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
«On est dans cette violence émotionnelle du moment où la réalité est devant nos yeux.

Via Patrick W., Pascal Paul
luiy's insight:
L'ébauche d'un mouvement civil

Une «internationale hacker» en gestation? Voire. La centralisation n'est pas le trait culturel dominant du mouvement —bien au contraire. Et le discours «classe contre classe», ou «camp contre camp», n'est pas sans soulever des objections.

 

«La vision politique de cette communauté est forte, nécessaire, et utile, mais il n'y a pas de sens de la nuance, et ce n'est pas sain, déplore Nadim Kobeissi, le principal développeur du chat chiffré Cryptocat. On peut améliorer la vie privée des utilisateurs sans pour autant définir un ennemi, les “bons” contre les “méchants”, ou se poser en super-héros. Il y a quelque chose d'un peu tribal dans tout ça.»


Pragmatisme versus idéologie: la tension, en vérité, traverse depuis longtemps le mouvement hacker. Ce que l'affaire Snowden pourrait avoir changé en profondeur, c'est la manière dont il se perçoit —comme le noyau dur d'un mouvement plus vaste de défense de la vie privée et des libertés en ligne.

 

«En tant que techniciens, en tant que hackers, on doit travailler avec les législateurs, avec les groupes de pression, pour avoir plus d'impact politique», avance ainsi Jurre Van Bergen. Reste à en trouver les moyens. Car si le CCC joue depuis longtemps un rôle d'expert auprès des autorités allemandes [2], et si les associations de défense des libertés en ligne tirent régulièrement la sonnette d'alarme, tout le monde ne joue pas dans la même catégorie. Un vrai problème en Europe, selon Chris Soghoian:

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EU nations developing cyber 'capabilities' to infiltrate government, private targets I #eGob #privacy

EU nations developing cyber 'capabilities' to infiltrate government, private targets I #eGob #privacy | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
European countries have entered a global race to develop aggressive cyber
attack capabilities, according to the latest threat landscape analysis
published by the European cyber security Agency ENISA yesterday (11
December).

Via Pierre Levy
luiy's insight:

Cyber becoming a strategic priority

He added that a capability plan is being finalised by EDA next year to determine strategic priorities.  “I would be surprised if cyber was not a priority if not at the top of the list,” he said.

 

ENISA’s report claimed that this year has seen impressive successes by law-enforcement, and that an increasing number of reports and data regarding cyber-threats has also improved the quality of available information.

 

“Cooperation among relevant organisations to commonly assess and defend cyber-threats has been envisaged and is going to gain speed in the near future,” the report said.

 

The report recommended the active involvement of end-users in defence of cyber-threats and increasing the speed of threat assessment to reduce exposures.

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Living in a #surveillance state: Mikko Hypponen I #privacy

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TED...
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La NSA a "continuellement" enfreint la loi pour collecter des données I #privacy #NSA #DataAwareness

La NSA a "continuellement" enfreint la loi pour collecter des données I #privacy #NSA #DataAwareness | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
D'anciens juges de la cour censée surveiller l'agence de renseignement américaine ont dénoncé à plusieurs reprises des collectes illégales de données.
luiy's insight:

DONNÉES COLLECTÉES ILLÉGALEMENT, EXPLOITÉES LÉGALEMENT


Dans son ordonnance, Colleen Kollar-Kotelly s'interroge notamment sur deux techniques, qui permettent d'enregistrer les informations entrantes et sortantes des communications téléphoniques (et potentiellement internet) : le "pen register"et les "trap & trace devices". Des méthodes de collecte jamais clairement définies par la loi, qui englobent selon elle "un spectre exceptionnellement large de collecte" de données.


Le juge John Bates, qui lui a succédé en 2006, abonde dans son sens : "La NSA a continuellement outrepassé les limites de l'acquisition légale" d'informations."Presque chaque" enregistrement réalisé par le programme "comprenait des données dont la collecte n'était pas autorisée", écrit-il. Or, le quotidien britannique rapportait en août qu'un vide juridique permettait à l'agence américaine d'exploiterdes informations collectées illégalement (en dehors de tout mandat), mais "par inadvertance". Quelques jours plus tard, l'actuel président de la FISC, Reggie B. Walton, reconnaissait dans le Washington Post manquer de moyens pour menersa mission de surveillance de la NSA.

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Introducing the Living With #Data series | #personalData #algorithms

Introducing the Living With #Data series | #personalData #algorithms | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
A field guide to the data and algorithms that shape our world
luiy's insight:

Literacy before legibility

 

Ads may seem innocuous, and many of us have learned to ignore them. But these ads might be some of the clearest signals we have about where our data flows and how it could be used in other contexts.

 

Each click is an input that goes in one end of the algorithmic black box, and the rest of our online experience comes out the other. Data is making our behaviors, habits and interests more legible to corporations and governments. But most of the time, that data is hidden from us unless we go digging for it. Even then, we have to know how and where to look. And we almost never get to see how the algorithms work, based on whatever parameters, features, weights and preferences engineers design into the system. That’s all proprietary — the secret sauce.

 

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Social Media and the ‘Spiral of Silence’ | #surveillance #privacy

Social Media and the ‘Spiral of Silence’ | #surveillance #privacy | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Facebook, Twitter, and other platforms did not provide new outlets for the discussion of the Snowden-NSA revelations. People who thought their social media friends disagreed with them were less likely to discuss the issues in person and online.
luiy's insight:

An informed citizenry depends on people’s exposure to information on important political issues and on their willingness to discuss these issues with those around them. The rise of social media, such as Facebook and Twitter, has introduced new spaces where political discussion and debate can take place. This report explores the degree to which social media affects a long-established human attribute—that those who think they hold minority opinions often self-censor, failing to speak out for fear of ostracism or ridicule. It is called the “spiral of silence.”

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New #tool makes online #personaldata more transparent | #privacy

New #tool makes online #personaldata more transparent | #privacy | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
The web can be an opaque black box: it leverages our personal information without our knowledge or control. When, for instance, a user sees an ad about depression online, she may not realize that she is seeing it because she recently sent an email about being sad. Roxana Geambasu and Augustin Chaintreau, ...
luiy's insight:

The tool for revealing personal data use on the Web. It reveals which specific data inputs (such as emails) are used to target which outputs (such as ads). It is general and can track data use both within and across arbitrary Web services. The key idea behind XRay is to detect targeting through black-box input/output correlation. XRay populates a series of extra accounts with subsets of the inputs and then looks at the differences and commonalities between the outputs that they get in order to obtain correlation. This mechanism is effective at detecting certain types of data uses, though not all. For its details, please refer to our research paper, which will appear in August at USENIX Security 2014, a top systems security conference.


http://xray.cs.columbia.edu/

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Google Tests #PersonalData Market To Find Out How Much Your Personal Information Is Worth | #databrokers

Google Tests #PersonalData Market To Find Out How Much Your Personal Information Is Worth | #databrokers | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
If you could sell your location data every day, how much would you charge? A research team including Google has carried out an experiment to find out.

Via C.I.L. CONSULTING
luiy's insight:

The personal information that your smart phone can collect about you is increasingly detailed. Apps can record your location, your level of exercise, the phone calls that you make and receive, the photographs that you take and who you share them with and so on.

 

Various studies have shown that this data provides a detailed and comprehensive insight into an individual’s habits and lifestyle, information that advertisers and marketers dearly love to have.

Indeed, this information can surprisingly useful. The Google Now smartphone app uses information such as your location to provide details it thinks you might find useful, such as directions home or nearby restaurants.

 

But this service isn’t entirely altruistic. Google knows perfectly well that it can use this information to sell adverts and other services.

That raises an interesting question. If companies such as Google can create a business model based on the use of this kind of personal information, how much is this information worth? And how should we value it when it comes to deciding who should have access to it and who shouldn’t?

 

Ref: arxiv.org/abs/1407.0566 : Money Walks: A Human-Centric Study on the Economics of Personal Mobile Data

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Data-Driven Journalism Will Save #Democracy and Your #Identity, Too | #ddj #privacy

Data-Driven Journalism Will Save #Democracy and Your #Identity, Too | #ddj #privacy | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Data journalism and the age of data democracy.
luiy's insight:

As it currently stands, big data is one seriously wild, wild west. It's implications are far reaching, but its implementations are quite slow. And even once the use of big data is implemented for an individual, across a company, for a country, throughout the globe — will we even know the true value of the information provided? Will we be able to tell when big data turns into useful data? Can we look at the industry and see the emergence of a data democracy — and then use it as such?

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Spy Toolkit: The Coolest Espionage Gadgets Throughout #History | #surveillance

Spy Toolkit: The Coolest Espionage Gadgets Throughout #History | #surveillance | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Spy gadgetry is constantly evolving, but history is chock-full of sweet espionage gizmos.
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An online Magna Carta: Berners-Lee calls for bill of rights for web | #privacy #open

An online Magna Carta: Berners-Lee calls for bill of rights for web | #privacy #open | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Exclusive: web's inventor warns neutrality under sustained attack from governments and corporations

Via Pierre Levy
luiy's insight:

Berners-Lee's Magna Carta plan is to be taken up as part of an initiative called "the web we want", which calls on people to generate a digital bill of rights in each country – a statement of principles he hopes will be supported by public institutions, government officials and corporations.

 

"Unless we have an open, neutral internet we can rely on without worrying about what's happening at the back door, we can't have open government, good democracy, good healthcare, connected communities and diversity of culture. It's not naive to think we can have that, but it is naive to think we can just sit back and get it."

Berners-Lee has been an outspoken critic of the American and British spy agencies' surveillance of citizens following the revelations by National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden. In the light of what has emerged, he said, people were looking for an overhaul of how the security services were managed.

 

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danah boyd: It's Complicated: Teen #Privacy in a Networked Age | @zephoria #cyberculture

danah boyd from Microsoft Research presents "It's Complicated: Teen Privacy in a Networked Age" at FOSI's 7th Annual Conference (#fosi2013) titled 'Connect.S...
luiy's insight:

But as Dr. Boyd sees it, adults are worrying about the wrong things.

Children today, she said, are reacting online largely to social changes that have taken place off line.

 

“Children’s ability to roam has basically been destroyed,” Dr. Boyd said in her office at Microsoft, where a view of the Boston skyline is echoed in the towers of books on her shelves, desk and floor. “Letting your child out to bike around the neighborhood is seen as terrifying now, even though by all measures, life is safer for kids today.”

Children naturally congregate on social media sites for the relatively unsupervised conversations, flirtations, immature humor and social exchanges that are the normal stuff of teenage hanging-out, she said.

 

“We need to give kids the freedom to explore and experience things online that might actually help them,” she added. “What scares me is that we don’t want to look at the things that make us uncomfortable. So rather than see what teenagers are showing us online about bullying and suicide and the problems they’re dealing with and using that information to help them, we’re making ourselves blind to it.”

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/22/fashion/danah-boyd-cracking-teenagers-online-codes.html?_r=0

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Timeline of #NSA Domestic Spying 1952-2014 | #surveillance #privacy

Timeline of #NSA Domestic Spying 1952-2014 | #surveillance #privacy | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
All of the evidence found in this timeline can also be found in the Summary of Evidence we submitted to the court in Jewel v. National Security Agency (NSA).
luiy's insight:

The timeline also includes documents leaked by the Guardian in June 2013 that confirmed the domestic spying by the NSA. The documents range from a Top Secret Court Order by the secret court overseeing the spying, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA Court), to a working draft of an NSA Inspector General report detailing the history of the program. The "NSA Inspectors General Reports" tab consists of one of three documents: a July 10, 2009 report written by Inspectors General of the Department of Justice (DOJ), NSA, Department of Defense (DOD), Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence; an internal working draft NSA Inspector General report leaked by the Guardian on June 27, 2013; and, an "End to End Review" of the Section 215 program conducted by the NSA for the FISA Court. For a short description of the people involved in the spying you can look at our Profiles page, which includes many of the key characters from the NSA Domestic Spying program.

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Has #BigData Made Anonymity Impossible? I #databrokers #privacy #awareness

Has #BigData Made Anonymity Impossible? I #databrokers #privacy #awareness | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
As digital data expands, anonymity may become a mathematical impossibility.
luiy's insight:

Yet these data brokers today are considered somewhat old-fashioned compared with Internet companies like Facebook, which have automated the collection of personal information so it can be done in real time. According to its financial filings at the time of its IPO, Facebook stores around 111 megabytes of photos and videos for each of its users, who now number more than a billion.

 

That’s 100 petabytes of personal information right there. In some European legal cases, plaintiffs have learned that Facebook’s records of their interactions with the site—including text messages, things they “liked,” and addresses of computers they used—run to 800 printed pages, adding up to another few megabytes per user.

 

In a step that’s worrisome to digital-privacy advocates, offline and online data sets are now being connected to help marketers target advertisements more precisely. In February, Facebook announced a deal with Acxiom and other data brokers to merge their data, linking real-world activities to those on the web. At a March investor meeting, Acxiom’s chief science officer claimed that its data could now be linked to 90% of U.S. social profiles.

 

Such data sets are often portrayed as having been “anonymized” in some way, but the more data they involve, the less like that is to be actually true. Mobile-phone companies, for instance, record users’ locations, strip out the phone numbers, and sell aggregate data sets to merchants or others interested in people’s movements.

MIT researchers Yves-Alexandre de Montjoye and César A. Hidalgo have shown that even when such location data is anonymous, just four different data points about a phone’s position can usually link the phone to a unique person.

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#Algorithms are watching I #privacy

#Algorithms are watching I #privacy | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
In his prescient novel '1984,' English author George Orwell predicted a future that bears an uncanny resemblance to current reality—except for a simple twist.
luiy's insight:

As algorithms become more sophisticated, their influence over our lives increases exponentially. "Much of what we see today is customized for us because of all the data tracking done by Google and Facebook," Zhao said. "They customize everything for you because of what you've already done." He and other researchers are trying to understand just how much this impacts us and to what extent data tracking influences what we see on a daily basis.

 

Eli Pariser, co-founder of the Internet news site Upworthy, coined the term "filter bubble" to describe how invisible algorithmic editing selectively guesses the information that users would like to see based on their past click behavior, search history and location. The results, however, can be quite one-sided. "There's a sense of being placed in this echo chamber - a term people use a lot," Zhao said. "Whatever you already believe, whatever you already like tends to get reflected back at you. If you're a hardcore liberal Democrat, for instance, Google shows you news from blue-leaning states. If you're a conservative Republican, then you get everything that's slanted that way."



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-12-algorithms.html#jCp

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Mlik Sahib's curator insight, December 9, 2013 10:58 PM

Eli Pariser, co-founder of the Internet news site Upworthy, coined the term "filter bubble" to describe how invisible algorithmic editing selectively guesses the information that users would like to see based on their past click behavior, search history and location. The results, however, can be quite one-sided. "There's a sense of being placed in this echo chamber - a term people use a lot," Zhao said. "Whatever you already believe, whatever you already like tends to get reflected back at you. If you're a hardcore liberal Democrat, for instance, Google shows you news from blue-leaning states. If you're a conservative Republican, then you get everything that's slanted that way."

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Networks, #complexity, and #privacy, by Casilli I #SNA

ATHENS programme seminar by Antonio A. Casilli (Telecom ParisTech, Nov. 19, 2013).
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