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antropologiaNet, dataviz, collective intelligence, algorithms, social learning, social change, digital humanities
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OpenGraphiti : Data Visualization Framework | #SNA #open #dataviz

OpenGraphiti : Data Visualization Framework | #SNA #open #dataviz | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:
Description

OpenGraphiti is a free and open source 3D data visualization engine for data scientists to visualize semantic networks and to work with them. It offers an easy-to-use API with several associated libraries to create custom-made datasets. It leverages the power of GPUs to process and explore the data and sits on a homemade 3D engine.

 

YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TE9qsYBu8MM

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Which social media network type is your topic? Which did you want it to be? | #SNA #datascience

Which social media network type is your topic?  Which did you want it to be? | #SNA #datascience | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
There are at least six different types of social media network structures present in systems like Twitter and other services in which people are able to reply to one another. Each of the six patter...
luiy's insight:

This table describes each of the six patterns in terms of the difference between that pattern and the other five patterns.

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Self-Organizing #Networked Systems: So when do we call a system #selforganizing?

Self-Organizing #Networked Systems: So when do we call a system #selforganizing? | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Self-Organizing Networked Systems -- A new paradigm for controlling networked systems

Via june holley, Jean-Michel Livowsky
luiy's insight:

- A self-organizing system (SOS) consists of a set of entities that obtains an emerging global system behavior via local interactions without centralized control.
(from Research Days'08, see [IWSOS:2008]))

- Self-organization is the process where a structure or pattern appears in a system without a central authority or external element imposing it through planning. (Wikipedia)

- A self-organizing system is a system that changes its basic structure as a function of its experience and environment. (Farley and Clark 1954)

- Are they really refering to the same thing? So be warned, when a discussion heads towards the definition of self-organization!

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Liz Rykert's curator insight, February 14, 2014 9:12 PM

Culture in an organization feels like it results from self-organizing patterns of relating. Here is one of three refs within the article - it is short and worth the read: A self-organizing system (SOS) consists of a set of entities that obtains an emerging global system behavior via local interactions without centralized control.
(from Research Days'08, see [IWSOS:2008]))

Leadership Learning Community's curator insight, February 15, 2014 1:07 PM

Another important concept to help structure leaders' collaborative learning.

Rescooped by luiy from Learning English Language
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The science of social connections I #networks

"I don't think it's a coincidence that of all the kinds of ways human beings could organize themselves into networks, that's what we do. We evince degree assortativity, and I don't think it's a coincidence that we do that. We assemble ourselves into groups, the group now has this property, this germ- resistance property, which is a property of the group, but which, as it turns out, also benefits and affects us. Now, being a member of that group, we are less likely to acquire pathogens.

And this sets the stage for a set of ideas that we and others have been exploring that shed light on multi-level selection and other kinds of contentious ideas in the biological and the social sciences. And we have a number of fellow travelers on this road—László Barabási, Dirk Helbing, Tooby and Cosmides, Frans de Waal, Nowak, Rand, Santos—people working on these related areas of interactions among animals and people, and what this means. In fact, David Rand and Josh Green and Martin Nowak just had a nice paper this past year — I was asked to highlight some papers—looking at whether you can use time to response as a kind of heuristic for understanding are people intuitive cooperators and rationally selfish, or do they exercise rational self-control over a kind of instinctive greed? The data they presented in that paper, to my eyes, was quite compelling—that we are intuitively wired to cooperate."


Via Howard Rheingold, Mariana Soffer
luiy's insight:

We can shift our perspective on lots of things when we think about people as being nodes on a graph, as being connected to other people. And this shift in focus might, in fact, prompt us to begin to think about —not the individuals themselves‑but the ties between them. This calls to mind an analogy, which I don't know if some of you may already know, of streets in the United States and in European countries. So, streets have names in our country, and the houses on the streets are numbered numerically and linearly as you move along the street. And the blocks between the streets don't have names or numbers and are seen as the things that are between the streets, and we don't pay much attention to them. But if you go to Japan, it's the blocks that are numbered. The blocks have names and the houses on the blocks are numbered in the order in which they were built, not numerically or linearly in any kind of systematic way. If you ask the Japanese, "What's going on with the streets?" they say, "The streets are the spaces between the blocks." They don't pay attention to those.

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, December 9, 2013 5:01 PM

Understanding the emergence of human culture requires an understanding of how social information and ideas spread through social networks -- and so does understanding the emergence and nature of human cooperation

Geoff Findley's curator insight, January 7, 2014 1:04 AM

Social Bonds

Rescooped by luiy from Cooperation Theory & Practice
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Do trees communicate? Networks, networks…

Do trees communicate? Networks, networks… | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
UBC Professor Suzanne Simard on Mother Trees. I was unfamiliar with how mycorrhizal networks connect the roots of trees, facilitating the sharing of resources. Dr. Suzanne Simard writes: Graduate s...

Via Howard Rheingold
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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, February 8, 2013 2:12 PM

I introduce mycorrhizal networks in my literacy of cooperation course, as part of the  module surveying cooperative arrangements in biology at all levels from the subcellular to the ecosystemic.

Rescooped by luiy from Social network data analysis
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The Social Networks of Myths

The Social Networks of Myths | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Social-network analysis of the characters in mythological texts reveal how realistic the myths are, by looking at how closely they ressemble the patterns of real social-networks. Realistic myths can reveal clues about their respective ancient civilization.


Via ukituki, eRelations
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#Complexity in Social Networks | #algorithms #SNA

#Complexity in Social Networks | #algorithms #SNA | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
How network structure impacts consumer experience.
luiy's insight:

In the same way software has “eaten” many industries and continues to devour more, the structure of complex systems is relevant in an increasing number of subjects, from neurobiology to industrial engineering. In the consumer internet, many of the most interesting technology platforms are, at their core, networks. As with most complex systems, small changes can have large consequences, and the structure of a network can materially impact consumer experience, many times changing the core way that people interact with the service.

 

One way to think about these technology platforms is to think of any complex network as having four fundamental components:

 

- Nodes (the objects in the graph, e.g., people, things)

 

- Data/content (the thing being shared between the nodes, e.g., tweet

 

- Edges with rules (e.g., bidirectional “friend”, single-directional “follow”)

 

- Jumping functions, specifically ways to transmit the data/content from one subgroup of people to another on the same platform, usually based on rules surrounding how the edges are structured (e.g., retweeting / liking / favoriting).

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Barnes, un #anthropologue à la « découverte » des réseaux sociaux | #DH #sna

Barnes, un #anthropologue à la « découverte » des réseaux sociaux | #DH #sna | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

Si l’on ne prête attention qu’à leur vogue récente, les « réseaux sociaux » auraient été inventés il y a une dizaine d’années en Californie par les fondateurs de Friendster, MySpace, LinkedIn, et bien sûr Facebook et Twitter. Mais si on se fie au contraire à la perspective théorique et méthodologique dessinée par la plupart des ouvrages d’introduction à l’analyse des réseaux sociaux(Wasserman et Faust, 1994 ; Lazega, 1995; Degenne et Forsé, 2004_ENREF_11 ; ENREF_9 Mercklé, 2011 ; Scott, 2012), leur existence serait en réalité aussi ancienne que l’humanité elle-même : à partir du moment où il y a des interactions entre individus et entre entités sociales, il y a des réseaux sociaux. Les approches historiographiques (Lemercier, 2005) font l’hypothèse qu’il y en avait dans la France du XIXe siècle (Gribaudi et Blum, 1990), dans l’Italie du XVe siècle (Padgett et Ansell, 1993), voire dans la Rome antique (Alexander et Danowski, 1990) ou le Néolithique méditerranéen (Brysbaert, 2011). Il serait plus exact de dire en réalité que ces approches ont fait, depuis une vingtaine d’années, l’hypothèse qu’il était pertinent de penser et de représenter sous la forme de « réseaux sociaux » des structures de relations sociales aussi anciennes que celles de la Renaissance ou du Néolithique.....

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Networks, Crowds, and Markets: A Book by David Easley and Jon Kleinberg | #SNA #dataviz

Networks, Crowds, and Markets: A Book by David Easley and Jon Kleinberg | #SNA #dataviz | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

Over the past decade there has been a growing public fascination with the complex "connectedness" of modern society. This connectedness is found in many incarnations: in the rapid growth of the Internet and the Web, in the ease with which global communication now takes place, and in the ability of news and information as well as epidemics and financial crises to spread around the world with surprising speed and intensity. These are phenomena that involve networks, incentives, and the aggregate behavior of groups of people; they are based on the links that connect us and the ways in which each of our decisions can have subtle consequences for the outcomes of everyone else.

 

Networks, Crowds, and Markets combines different scientific perspectives in its approach to understanding networks and behavior. Drawing on ideas from economics, sociology, computing and information science, and applied mathematics, it describes the emerging field of study that is growing at the interface of all these areas, addressing fundamental questions about how the social, economic, and technological worlds are connected.

 

The book is based on an inter-disciplinary course entitled Networks that we teach at Cornell. The book, like the course, is designed at the introductory undergraduate level with no formal prerequisites. To support deeper explorations, most of the chapters are supplemented with optional advanced sections.

 

The book is published by Cambridge University Press (2010); for more information, please see Cambridge's page for the book.

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Think link: network #patterns in social media I #SNA #dataviz

Think link: network #patterns in social media I #SNA #dataviz | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

Divided networks are created when two groups of people talk about a controversial topic – but do not connect to people in the “other” group. Unified networks are formed by small to medium sized groups that are obscure or professional topics, conference hashtags are a good example. Fragmented networks have few connections among the people in them: these are often people talking about a brand or popular topic or event. Clusters sometimes grow among the people talking about a brand, indicating a existence of a brand “community”.Broadcast networks are formed when a prominent media person is widely repeated by many audience members, forming a hub-and-spoke pattern with the spokes pointed inward at the hub. The final pattern is the opposite, hub-and-spoke patterns with the hub linking out to a number of spokes. This pattern is generated by technical and customer support accounts like those for computer and airline companies. Additional patterns may exist, but these patterns are prominent in many social media network data sets.

 

When applied to external conversations, social media networks help identify the “mayor” of a hashtag or topic: these are the people at the center of the network. Network maps can be compared to the six basic types of networks to understand the nature of the topic community. We can look for examples of successful social media efforts and map those topic networks. Social media managers can contrast their topics with those of their aspirational targets and measure the difference between where they are and where they want to be.

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The Hidden Power of Networks

The Hidden Power of Networks | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

 

Tim Brown, CEO of IDEO talks about the power of networks in this great video from The World Economic Forum 'Summer Davos' in Tianjin, China.

 

We often take decisions by using the wrong or outdated tools and theories. Network science and tools are readily available to inform decisions in different sectors and organizations. Their adoption for decision-making should be further promoted.

 

Curated by Kenneth Mikkelsen on: www.scoop.it/t/first-class-collaboration

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
luiy's insight:
Nowadays, any organization should employ network scientists/analysts who are able to map and analyse complex systems that are of importance to the organization (e.g. the organization itself, its activities, a country’s economic activities, transportation networks, research networks).Interconnectivity is beneficial but also brings in vulnerability: if you and I are connected we can share resources; meanwhile your problems can become mine and vice versa.The concept of “crystallized imagination” refers to things that are first in our head and then become reality. This concept can be turned into network applied research on economic complexity of a country’s economic activities and development prospects.
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Visualizing Databases | Digital Humanities Specialist

Visualizing Databases | Digital Humanities Specialist | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Summaries and statistics drawn from within the structure of the database are not enough. If there is to be any real grappling with the database as an culturally-embedded construct, then it has to be done in a manner that reveals the data, the model and the population simultaneously.


Via Lauren Moss
luiy's insight:

I’ve become quite the fan of Gephi, lately, and received a good-natured challenge by one of my colleagues, which went something like, “Why is a everything a network with you, now?”  Obviously, in the case of social network-like phenomena, such as mapping collaboration in the Digital Humanities with the DH@Stanford graph–network theory and network language (whether visual or theoretical) make sense.  Network analytical tools like Gephi are also only a short step away from spatial analytical tools, like ArcGIS, many of which are used to ask questions about geographic networks and not about the kind of continuous data found in topography.

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