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#Privacy, Anonymity, and #BigData in the Social Sciences | #dh #MOOC

#Privacy, Anonymity, and #BigData in the Social Sciences | #dh #MOOC | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
A recent article suggests that open science may be irreconcilable with anonymous data, requiring a reconsideration of how we protect privacy in educational data.
luiy's insight:

The short version: many people have called for making science more open and transparent by sharing data and posting data openly. This allows researchers to check each other's work and to aggregate smaller datasets into larger ones. One saying that I'm fond of is: "the best use of your dataset is something that someone else will come up with." The problem is that increasingly, all of this data is about us. In education, it's about our demographics, our learning behavior, and our performance. Across the social sciences, it's about our health, our beliefs, and our social connections. Sharing and merging data adds to the risk of disclosing those data. 

 

The article shares a case study of our efforts to strike a balance between anonymity and open science by de-identifying a dataset of learner data from HarvardX and releasing it to the public. In order to de-identify the data to a standard that we thought was reasonably resistant to reidentification efforts, we had to delete some records and blur some variables. If a learner's combination of identifying variables was too unique, we either deleted the record or scrubbed the data to make it look less unique. The result was suitable for release (in our view), but as we looked more closely at the released dataset, it wasn't suitable for science. We scrubbed the data to the point where it was problematically dissimilar from the original dataset. If you do research using our data, you can't be sure if your findings are legitimate or an artifact of de-identification. 

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MIT and Harvard release de-identified learning data from #MOOCs | #LearningAnalytics

MIT and Harvard release de-identified learning data from #MOOCs | #LearningAnalytics | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Dataset contains the original learning data from the 16 HarvardX and MITx courses offered in 2012-13.
luiy's insight:

Ho and Chuang anticipate that the data will offer insight to other educational researchers. Moreover, the methods used to protect learner privacy comply with FERPA (Federal Education Rights and Privacy Act) regulations, which govern the release of such data. The practice should inform the release of future datasets from edX and offer lessons more broadly.

 

“Learning data from open online courses hold great promise for research, but good research must be replicable by others,” says Ho, an associate professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and co-chair of the HarvardX Research Committee. “By sharing these de-identified data, we hope to show that we can protect information about individuals while still enabling replicable research about what works in online learning.”

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Is ‘massive open online #research’ #MOOR the next frontier for #education? | #MOOC

Is ‘massive open online #research’ #MOOR the next frontier for #education? | #MOOC | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
UC San Diego is launching the first major online course that prominently features massive open online research (MOOR). In “Bioinformatics Algorithms
luiy's insight:

UC San Diego is launching the first major online course that prominently features “massive open online research” (MOOR).

 

In “Bioinformatics Algorithms — Part 1,” UC San Diego computer science and engineering professor Pavel Pevzner and his graduate students are offering a course on Coursera that combines research with a MOOC (massive open online course) for the first time.

 

“All students who sign up for the course will be given an opportunity to work on specific research projects under the leadership of prominent bioinformatics scientists from different countries, who have agreed to interact and mentor their respective teams.”

 

“The natural progression of education is for people to make a transition from learning to research, which is a huge jump for many students, and essentially impossible for students in isolated areas,” said Ph.D. student Phillip Compeau, who helped develop the online course. “By integrating the research with an interactive text and a MOOC, it creates a pipeline to streamline this transition.”

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Learn #Hadoop & #BigData with #Free Courses Online | Big Data University

Learn #Hadoop & #BigData with #Free Courses Online | Big Data University | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Learn Big Data technologies like Hadoop, HDFS, Hive, HBase, MapReduce, JAQL, Pig,
Flume, ZooKeeper, Mahout, Streams, and others. Big Data University offers free online courses taught by the leading
experts in the field.
luiy's insight:
About Big Data University

Big Data University is an online educational site run by new and experienced Hadoop, Big Data and DB2 users who want to learn, contribute with course materials, or look for job opportunities.

The site includes free and fee-based courses delivered by experienced professionals and teachers.

Big Data University is hosted on the Cloud, and is run by a group of enthusiasts from around the world. They use Moodle 2 course management system enabled to run on DB2.

If you would like to provide feedback, contribute with free or fee-based courses, or have questions, please contact us.

- See more at: http://bigdatauniversity.com/web/about.php#sthash.nwkSnZCS.dpuf

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European #MOOCs Scoreboard | #learning #open

European #MOOCs Scoreboard | #learning #open | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

The aim of this scoreboard is to highlight the huge potential that European institutions have in the world of MOOCs and to help visualize this potential by compiling the existing European-provided MOOCs available on different open websites. 


Via Irina Radchenko
luiy's insight:

How we created our MOOC database

 

When we first started preparing to launch Open Education Europa, we attempted to make contact with every higher education institution in Europe, asking to whether or not they offered any MOOCs or other open educational resources. Hundreds of institutions answered us, and with the information they provided we started populating our database. Then we went to the websites of the institutions who had not responded and searched for publicly available MOOCs, which we also added to the database. Finally, we cross-checked with other MOOC providers and aggregators such as iversity and OpenupEd.

 

Updating the scoreboard

 

On an ongoing basis, we monitor for new MOOCs by using Google alerts, RSS feeds, and manual searches. The institutions we have contact with update us when they have new courses. We also check the MOOC providers and aggregators every month to see what’s new. As soon as we find a new MOOC online, we add it to our database. That means that some MOOCs are counted in the scoreboard before the start date of the course.

 

By the way, if you happen to know about a secret stash of MOOCs that aren’t included in our database, please tip us off!

 

 

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University of London #MOOC Report | Barney Grainger | #KM #coursera


Via Peter B. Sloep, Peter Bryant, Greenwich Connect, Professor Jill Jameson, Rui Guimarães Lima
luiy's insight:

Project Planning a MOOC

 

The course teams involved with our MOOCs included experienced academics with familiarity in developing materials on a learning platform. Nonetheless, for each of them it was their first experience of MOOCs, as it was for the project planning team.

 

 

Delivering a MOOC

 

A range of styles and learning methods were adopted by the four MOOCs, appropriate to the subject matter covered. A MOOC structure of six weeks and 5-10 student effort hours per week of study appeared to be just right for the majority of students (55%). Some considerations for future delivery include:

 

< Well designed announcements at the beginning and end of each week that articulate with the topic coverage, learning activities and assessment methods can be effective at maintaining student interest and motivation.


< Management of forum threads and posts is a critical factor in dealing with massive scale short courses to ensure the majority of students are not affected negatively by the behaviour of a small number of the community, while preserving the openness of the discussion areas.

 

< The Coursera platform tools are significant and comprehensive in terms of plotting overall student activity, allowing evaluation of assessment data, as well as usage statistics on video resources and other learning activities; however, further refinement of these tools to enable both students and teaching staff to understand their progression at an individual level is necessary (and underway).



** Learning Resource Development


 


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niftyjock's curator insight, February 17, 5:43 PM

More MOOC Mania

Manuel León Urrutia's curator insight, March 2, 9:28 AM

Another MOOC report, this time from University of London. Section 6 specially interesting for MOOC making. 

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, May 20, 2:22 AM

University of London MOOC Report .

I Barney Gracinger, U. London

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#MOOC « Scientific Humanities » Instructor: Bruno Latour | #STS

#MOOC « Scientific Humanities » Instructor: Bruno Latour | #STS | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:
ABOUT THE COURSE

"Scientific humanities" means the extension of interpretative skills to the discoveries made by science and to technical innovations. The course will equip future citizens with the means to be at ease with many issues that straddle the distinctions between science, morality, politics and society.

The course provides concepts and methods to :

learn the basics of the field called “science and technology studies”, a vast corpus of literature developed over the last forty years to give a realistic description of knowledge productionhandle the flood of different opinions about contentious issues and order the various positions by using the tools now available through digital mediacomment on those different pieces of news in a more articulated way through a specifically designed blog.

 

Course Format : the course is organized in 8 sequences It displays multimedia contents (images, video, original documents)

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