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Which Countries Are Banning Phone Surveillance Statistics? | #privacy #surveillance

Which Countries Are Banning Phone Surveillance Statistics? | #privacy #surveillance | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Vodafone lifts the lid on mobile monitoring in 27 countries
luiy's insight:

Vodafone, one of the world's largest mobile phone groups, has revealed the existence of secret wires that allow government agencies to listen to all conversations on its networks, saying they are widely used in some of the 29 countries in which it operates in Europe and beyond.

 

The company has broken its silence on government surveillance in order to push back against the increasingly widespread use of phone and broadband networks to spy on citizens, and will publish its first Law Enforcement Disclosure Report on Friday. At 40,000 words, it is the most comprehensive survey yet of how governments monitor the conversations and whereabouts of their people.

 

The company said wires had been connected directly to its network and those of other telecoms groups, allowing agencies to listen to or record live conversations and, in certain cases, track the whereabouts of a customer. Privacy campaigners said the revelations were a "nightmare scenario" that confirmed their worst fears on the extent of snooping.

 

In Albania, Egypt, Hungary, India, Malta, Qatar, Romania, South Africa and Turkey, it is unlawful to disclose any information related to wiretapping or interception of the content of phone calls and messages including whether such capabilities exist.

 

http://www.theguardian.com/business/2014/jun/06/vodafone-reveals-secret-wires-allowing-state-surveillance

 

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/europe/2014/06/vodafone-reveals-network-spying-states-201466134726119937.html

 

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"Facebook vacations" : Mark Zuckerberg on Facebook Home, Money, and the Future of Communication

"Facebook vacations" : Mark Zuckerberg on Facebook Home, Money, and the Future of Communication | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Photograph by Platon FACEBOOK Mark Zuckerberg on Facebook Home, Money, and the Future of Communication As caretaker of a service with a bill

Via Pierre Levy
luiy's insight:
But sharing can be exhausting. You hear about people taking “Facebook vacations.” It’s an interesting phenomenon. We have two ways to turn off Facebook: deactivate and delete. The group who chooses to turn Facebook off permanently is relatively small, but there’s a larger set of people who will deactivate their account for a day or two because they want to focus and study for a test—it’s the equivalent of locking yourself in the library. It’s actually a very popular feature. Did you ever take a Facebook vacation? I don’t think I ever have. I certainly turn off my phone from time to time. Changes made to Facebook used to reliably draw outrage, especially over privacy concerns. But when you announced Graph Search, which allows users to find more personal information shared by their friends, there wasn’t much of an outcry. What have you learned? One of the things we did a lot better this time is we talked to a lot of folks to understand the concerns of organizations and others. Typically we have an iterative approach, but here we felt, in terms of privacy, everything had to be there at the beginning. The project was actually ready to go in December, but we took an extra month to build more privacy tools. You say Facebook follows “the Hacker Way.” How is it core to what happens here? It really is our philosophy for how we build stuff. There are a bunch of companies that try to make every release perfect, and Apple is the best at that. That’s wonderful, but there’s another way of doing things that’s potentially even better over the long term—allow yourself room to experiment and don’t try to make each individual release as polished as possible. You’re not yet 30 and you’ve begun to make some significant charitable contributions. What’s your thinking on this? Bill Gates offered me some advice: Don’t just give your money away—it’s something that requires practice to get good at. So why wait? Clearly I have a day job that takes up 99 percent of my time, so I can’t be running a foundation. But I can take a venture capital approach, where you invest in people. I made the investment in Newark schools because I really believed in the governor and mayor over there, and they’ve delivered.
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Pierre Levy's curator insight, April 5, 2013 10:53 AM

But sharing can be exhausting. You hear about people taking “Facebook vacations.” It’s an interesting phenomenon. We have two ways to turn off Facebook: deactivate and delete. The group who chooses to turn Facebook off permanently is relatively small, but there’s a larger set of people who will deactivate their account for a day or two because they want to focus and study for a test—it’s the equivalent of locking yourself in the library. It’s actually a very popular feature.

Lorena Betta's curator insight, April 7, 2013 9:04 AM

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