e-Xploration
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antropologiaNet, dataviz, collective intelligence, algorithms, social learning, social change, digital humanities
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Google lance le traitement de votre #ADN dans son cloud | #genomics #health

Google lance le traitement de votre #ADN dans son cloud | #genomics #health | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Google lance Google Genomics, une API qui permettra aux chercheurs d'envoyer leurs séquences ADN pour les traiter avec le cloud de Google, et les partager avec la communauté

Via C.I.L. CONSULTING
luiy's insight:

La guerre commerciale que se livrent les géants du cloud pour posséder chez eux les informations génétiques de millions d'individus a commencé. Alors que nous rapportions en début de semaine que la firme IBM s'imaginait être capable d'ici cinq ans d'analyser l'ADN des patients pour proposer aux médecins un traitement adapté en quelques minutes, Google a annoncé vendredi la mise à disposition d'une API dédiée au traitement du génome, baptisée Google Genomics. 

 

L'API permettra aux chercheurs d'envoyer les séquences ADN qu'ils doivent traiter sur les serveurs de Google, et de profiter de la puissance de calcul et des algorithmes de Google pour faciliter la lecture des séquences, et réaliser leur alignement à partir de séquences de référence. L'outil peut importer en masse les séquences ADN alignées au format BAM, importer des séquences non alignées, réaliser des traitements sur les données, et exporter les séquençages au format BAM.

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Exclusive: How Google's #Algorithms Rules the Web

Exclusive: How Google's #Algorithms Rules the Web | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Want to know how Google is about to change your life? Stop by the Ouagadougou conference room on a Thursday morning. It is here, at the Mountain View, Cali

Via Pierre Levy, juandoming
luiy's insight:

Google is famously creative at encouraging these breakthroughs; every year, it holds an internal demo fair called CSI — Crazy Search Ideas — in an attempt to spark offbeat but productive approaches. But for the most part, the improvement process is a relentless slog, grinding through bad results to determine what isn’t working. One unsuccessful search became a legend: Sometime in 2001, Singhal learned of poor results when people typed the name “audrey fino” into the search box. Google kept returning Italian sites praising Audrey Hepburn. (Fino means fine in Italian.) “We realized that this is actually a person’s name,” Singhal says. “But we didn’t have the smarts in the system.”

 

The Audrey Fino failure led Singhal on a multiyear quest to improve the way the system deals with names — which account for 8 percent of all searches. To crack it, he had to master the black art of “bi-gram breakage” — that is, separating multiple words into discrete units. For instance, “new york” represents two words that go together (a bi-gram). But so would the three words in “new york times,” which clearly indicate a different kind of search. And everything changes when the query is “new york times square.” Humans can make these distinctions instantly, but Google does not have a Brazil-like back room with hundreds of thousands of cubicle jockeys. It relies on algorithms.

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Catherine Pascal's curator insight, January 30, 2014 6:33 AM

 Clair !!

Mlik Sahib's curator insight, January 31, 2014 12:08 AM

"The comparison demonstrates the power, even intelligence, of Google’s algorithm, honed over countless iterations. It possesses the seemingly magical ability to interpret searchers’ requests — no matter how awkward or misspelled. Google refers to that ability as search quality, and for years the company has closely guarded the process by which it delivers such accurate results. But now I am sitting with Singhal in the search giant’s Building 43, where the core search team works, because Google has offered to give me an unprecedented look at just how it attains search quality. The subtext is clear: You may think the algorithm is little more than an engine, but wait until you get under the hood and see what this baby can really do."

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Google acquiert DeepMind, start-up en intelligence artificielle | #algorithms #NSA

Google acquiert DeepMind, start-up en intelligence artificielle | #algorithms #NSA | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Google continue de surfer sur la vague de la robotique et de l’intelligence artificielle. En rachetant la startup britannique DeepMind, spécialisée dans l’AI, le géant du web dévoile ses intentions un peu plus.
luiy's insight:

Google vient d’acquérir DeepMind Technologies pour environ 400.000 dollars. DeepMind se définit comme une startup combinant les meilleures méthodes d’apprentissage automatique et des neurosciences des systèmes pour construire des algorithmes utilisables dans la vie de tous les jours. DeepMind commercialise ses applications pour des simulations e-commerce et les jeux vidéos.

 

-------------------------------------------------------

 

Plus aucun doute : Google axe sa stratégie autour de l’intelligence artificielle, indispensable notamment pour ses applications de traduction ainsi que ses solutions de reconnaissance vocale. Après le recrutement de Ray Kurzweil, le père des théories sur la singularité technologique et la création en mai dernier d’un laboratoire baptiséQuantum Artificial Intelligence Lab en collaboration avec la NASA, Google se donne un peu plus les moyens de développer des algorithmes capables de faire des prévisions plus précises.

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Google Online Takedown Requests Browser I #dataviz #bigdata

Google Online Takedown Requests Browser I #dataviz #bigdata | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
An interactive visual Google Online Takedown Requests browser by Frontwise!
luiy's insight:
ABOUT THIS BROWSER

This browser visualizes trends and patterns in Google online takedown requests from copyright owners and governments. It provides a monthly overview of requests and targeted domains or products, ordered by time and volume. Colors indicate if requests were justified, and the degree of copyright infringement of the targets. Extended information about requests and targets can be revealed by hovering or clicking items

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Share Your Google Analytics Data As An Infographic

Share Your Google Analytics Data As An Infographic | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Wouldn’t it be great to get weekly website performance updates as a simple, easy-to-read graphic?

Now you can go beyond the Google Analytics dashboard with a new creative  – and free – tool by Visual.ly. The New Google Analytics Report automatically delivers an infographic depicting your favorite metrics right to your desktop. See the infographic at the article link for a sample of a full infographic that is generated...


Via Lauren Moss
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Didde Glad's curator insight, March 24, 2013 5:52 PM

Præsentér ledelsesinformation i GRATIS designet dashboard med gnaske få klik 

 

 

 

 

ParadigmGallery's comment, March 25, 2013 11:48 AM
did it, interesting, not so sure the artsy, soft approach to the analytics report is as visually satisfying as the bright, primary colors of google.....
AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, April 9, 2013 10:03 PM

Awesome scoop, thanks Robin!

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How Google Works | #algorithms

How Google Works | #algorithms | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Have you ever wondered how Google works? To help you get a better understanding of Google’s algorithm as well as to show you how some of Google’s

Via Don Dea
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Don Dea's curator insight, February 25, 2014 12:46 AM

It's economically feasible too. The average access speed in the U.S. is now under 10 megabits per second and costs around $40-$60. Verizon FiOS charges $300 a month for 500 megabit service. Yet Google and others charge just $70 a month for a full gigabit connection, download and upload. VTel in Springfield, Vt., charges $35. Gigabit in Hong Kong was $26 way back in 2011.

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Google's Grand Plan to Make Your Brain Irrelevant | #algorithms

Google's Grand Plan to Make Your Brain Irrelevant | #algorithms | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Google is on a shopping spree. But instead of a shopping cart filled with gadgets or groceries, its aggressive buy-up of robotics, smart device, and artificial intelligence startups is Google's way of assembling the pieces and people it needs to...
luiy's insight:

Basically, the idea is to mimic the biological structure of the human brain with software so that it can build machines that learn “organically” — that is, without human involvement.

 

Google is already working to apply these insights to its familiar consumer products and services. Deep learning can help recognize what’s in your photos without asking you to tag them yourself, and it can help understand human speech, a key tool for its smartphone apps and Google Glass computerized eyewear. But Google also sees the new AI as a better way to target ads — the core of its business.

 

The DeepMind acquisition is one more step down this road. And though the company has not said as much, you can bet that this new form of AI will also play into things like Nest smart thermostats, the Google self-driving cars, and its big push into robotics.

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Google #crawlers: See which #robots Google uses to crawl the web

Google #crawlers: See which #robots Google uses to crawl the web | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

See which robots Google uses to crawl the web.

luiy's insight:

"Crawler" is a generic term for any program (such as a robot or spider) used to automatically discover and scan websites by following links from one webpage to another. Google's main crawler is called Googlebot. This table lists information about the common Google crawlers you may see in your referrer logs, and how they should be specified in robots.txt, the robots meta tags, and the X-Robots-Tag HTTP directives.

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Use These Secret #NSA Google Search Tips to Become Your Own Spy Agency | Wired | #privacy #surveillance

Use These Secret #NSA Google Search Tips to Become Your Own Spy Agency | Wired | #privacy #surveillance | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Want to know how to "'hack" Google like the pros? The NSA has released a book it produced for its workers on how to find intelligence on the web.

Via Pierre Levy, Jay Ratcliff
luiy's insight:

The 643-page tome, called Untangling the Web: A Guide to Internet Research (.pdf), was just released by the NSA following a FOIA request filed in April by MuckRock, a site that charges fees to process public records for activists and others.

 

The book was published by the Center for Digital Content of the National Security Agency, and is filled with advice for using search engines, the Internet Archive and other online tools. But the most interesting is the chapter titled “Google Hacking.”

 

Say you’re a cyberspy for the NSA and you want sensitive inside information on companies in South Africa. What do you do?

Search for confidential Excel spreadsheets the company inadvertently posted online by typing “filetype:xls site:za confidential” into Google, the book notes.

 

Want to find spreadsheets full of passwords in Russia? Type “filetype:xls site:ru login.” Even on websites written in non-English languages the terms “login,” “userid,” and “password” are generally written in English, the authors helpfully point out.

 

Misconfigured web servers “that list the contents of directories not intended to be on the web often offer a rich load of information to Google hackers,” the authors write, then offer a command to exploit these vulnerabilities — intitle: “index of” site:kr password.

 

“Nothing I am going to describe to you is illegal, nor does it in any way involve accessing unauthorized data,” the authors assert in their book. Instead it “involves using publicly available search engines to access publicly available information that almost certainly was not intended for public distribution.” You know, sort of like the “hacking” for which Andrew “weev” Aurenheimer was recently sentenced to 3.5 years in prison for obtaining publicly accessible information from AT&T’s website.

 

Stealing intelligence on the internet that others don’t want you to have might not be illegal, but it does come with other risks, the authors note: “It is critical that you handle all Microsoft file types on the internet with extreme care. Never open a Microsoft file type on the internet. Instead, use one of the techniques described here,” they write in a footnote. The word “here” is hyperlinked, but since the document is a PDF the link is inaccessible. No word about the dangers that Adobe PDFs pose. But the version of the manual the NSA released was last updated in 2007, so let’s hope later versions cover it.

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