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Online collaboration: Scientists and the social network | #science #socialmedia

Online collaboration: Scientists and the social network | #science #socialmedia | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Giant academic social networks have taken off to a degree that no one expected even a few years ago. A Nature survey explores why.
luiy's insight:

The results confirm that ResearchGate is certainly well-known (see ‘Remarkable reach’, and full results online at go.nature.com/jvx7pl). More than 88% of scientists and engineers said that they were aware of it — slightly more than had heard of Google+ and Twitter — with little difference between countries. Just under half said that they visit regularly, putting the site second only to Google Scholar, and ahead of Facebook and LinkedIn. Almost 29% of regular visitors had signed up for a profile on ResearchGate in the past year.

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Francisco Restivo's curator insight, August 23, 3:12 PM

Scientists and social scientists use social networks differently. But they use!

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Une #cartographie des différences dans les #cultures de #management | #dataviz

Une #cartographie des différences dans les #cultures de #management | #dataviz | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Les différences culturelles sont la source de nombreux malentendus dans un cadre professionnel international et multiculturel. Erin Meyer, professeure de management interculturel à l’INSEAD (Fontainebleau), a développé un outil pour visualiser ces malentedus qui peuvent survenir entre des équipes de deux pays différents. La Harvard Business Review publie une version interactive de ces comparaisons internationales.


Via Annie Longeot, François Le Pivain
luiy's insight:

BY ERIN MEYER. To help managers negotiate this complexity I have developed a tool called the Culture Map. It plots culture on eight scales that apply to the most common challenges managers face. By comparing the relative position of one culture to another on each scale, a manager can decode how culture influences day-to-day collaboration. Try the pairs illustrated in this exhibit to see how the map can help. Many other culture pairs are available in my new book The Culture Map. 

 

 

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Didier Lebouc's curator insight, June 15, 1:05 AM

Il faut surtout aller voir la carte interactive en ligne sur HBR

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Collaborative Analytics: #Analytics for your #BigData via @YvesMulkers

Collaborative Analytics: #Analytics for your #BigData via @YvesMulkers | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
So what is collaborative analytics™ and why should one care about it? If you read my blog on “Rethinking Big Analytics to handle BigData”, you kind-of get the gist on the need for some better analy...
luiy's insight:

Our ways to analyze the data is still old school. They are either human or machine dependent and are very isolative with collaborations only possible via manual ways. We all know that there is always someone around you who knows more that you do and could help you get to the next step. The problem is that manual ways are not efficient in helping find those people. So, what should one do?- Invent ways to make analytics discoverable, to make best practices flow and that too with minimal impact to business. A good start will be to start digging for areas that will make our analytics strategy robust and scalable with evolving technological landscape and changing customer dynamics. And if possible, keeping the strategy least invasive and in line with current business practice. No, getting whole minority report on your current business will take forever, and is not very cost effective, you need something sustainable, something that could be implemented in small scale and easy to replicate. That would make collaborative analytics possible.

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The #CollectiveIntelligence Blog - Exploring new models of #collaboration and network organization

The #CollectiveIntelligence Blog - Exploring new models of #collaboration and network organization | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Exploring new models of collaboration and network organization

Via Spaceweaver
luiy's insight:

Nature can inspire us to explore emerging models of interaction that will help to better understand patterns of collective intelligence in human groups. Steven Johnson, in his book “Emerging Systems” (2001), masterfully demonstrates how that connection (called Biomimicry or biomimetics) is full of metaphors. The Web Ask Nature, the Biomimicry Institute, brings together hundreds of examples of such associations.

 

In a previous post I mentioned that one of the things I liked about the Collective Intelligence Conference held at MIT in April 2012 was to listen to Deborah Gordon (Stanford) and Ian Couzin (Princeton), two behavioral biologists, who focused on the study of the patterns of behavior of animals in their natural habitats. They are not “biologists” in its classical sense but work as multidisciplinary groups that are making increasing use of mathematics and computer science as well as tracking and geolocation devices to investigate the collective behavior of swarms or “Swarm Intelligence“, a branch of artificial intelligence based on the collective behavior of decentralized and self-organized systems. 

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Spaceweaver's curator insight, May 21, 1:10 PM

Looks an interesting blog

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Power Law of Participation Continuum - From #collectiveintelligence to #collaborative intelligence

Power Law of Participation Continuum - From #collectiveintelligence to #collaborative intelligence | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via Claude Emond
luiy's insight:

The byproduct of use is a Conucopia of the Commons -- the act of using the database adds value to it.  As users engage in low threshold participation (read, favorite, tag and link) we gain a form of collective intelligence.  But it is important to distinguish the value of collective intelligence and collaborative intelligence, as first pointed out by Mitch Kapor:

...Tons of interesting types of collaborative filtering, like Digg, is TiVo like, indicating individual preferences, with some algorythm logic.  Valid and interesting, but people are not connecting.  Different from a bunch of people focusing on creating something.  That is higher value than collaborative filtering, my thesis, if you can get people to work together.  Look at health information, broadly speaking, why are doctors not collaborating to build such a resource -- the lack of information, locked up in a database that Harvard publishes, kills people.  I can feel the opportunity... 

When users participate in high enagement activities, connecting with one another, a different kind of value is being created.  But my core point isn't just the difference between these forms of group intelligence -- but actually how the co-exist in the best communities.

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Claude Emond's curator insight, February 17, 4:59 PM

Where do you see yourself on this continuum? I am actually somewhere along the comment-collaborate area of the graph, and I aspire to lead :)

Claude Emond's curator insight, February 17, 5:01 PM

Where do you see yourself on this continuum? I am actually somewhere along the comment-collaborate area of the graph, and I aspire to lead :)

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Collaboration is the New Competition

Five ways to drive large-scale social change by working cooperatively.

Via ddrrnt, Complexity Digest
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ddrrnt's curator insight, January 11, 2013 11:19 PM

Leaders and organizations are acknowledging that even their best individual efforts can't stack up against today's complex and interconnected problems. They are putting aside self-interests and collaborating to build a new civic infrastructure to advance their shared objectives. It's called collective impact and it's a growing trend across the country. (...)

While collaboration is certainly not a foreign concept, what we're seeing around the country is the coming together of non-traditional partners, and a willingness to embrace new ways of working together. And, this movement is yielding promising results.

... five lessons for driving large-scale social change through collaboration:


  1. Clearly define what you can do together: As Dana O'Donovan of the Monitor Institute has noted, many organizations find collaboration to be messy and time consuming. From the very beginning, you must develop clarity of purpose and articulate, "What can we do together that we could not do alone?" (...)
  2. Transcend parochialism: Even the most well intended collaboration is often crippled by parochialism. Individual organizations earmark their participation and resources for activities that perfectly align with their own work or they use the collaboration platform as a way to get other participants to fund their own priorities. (...)
  3. Adapt to data: The complex, multidisciplinary problems that many collaborative projects tackle do not have easy fixes. These challenges require continuous learning and innovation and the use of real-time data to help participants understand what is and isn't working. Adjustments must be made on the fly. (...)
  4. Feed the field: You have an obligation to share what you learn — both the results and the methods for achieving them. Living Cities has long understood the value that our member institutions get by learning and working together. (...)
  5. Support the backbone: In our experience, progress is best achieved when a "backbone organization," keeps the group's work moving forward. Staff at these organizations ensure that work is completed between meetings, track data, enable adaptation, disseminate knowledge, and build buy-in and ownership from all participants.(...)

Ben Hecht

Ben Hecht is President & CEO of Living Cities, an organization that harnesses the collective knowledge of its 22 member foundations and financial institutions to benefit low income people and the cities where they live.