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Ethnography for the Internet | #Anthropology #CyberEthnography

Ethnography for the Internet | #Anthropology #CyberEthnography | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

The internet has become embedded into our daily lives, no longer an esoteric phenomenon, but instead an unremarkable way of carrying out our interactions with one another. Online and offline are interwoven in everyday experience. Using the internet has become accepted as a way of being present in the world, rather than a means of accessing some discrete virtual domain. Ethnographers of these contemporary Internet-infused societies consequently find themselves facing serious methodological dilemmas: where should they go, what should they do there and how can they acquire robust knowledge about what people do in, through and with the internet?

This book presents an overview of the challenges faced by ethnographers who wish to understand activities that involve the internet. Suitable for both new and experienced ethnographers, it explores both methodological principles and practical strategies for coming to terms with the definition of field sites, the connections between online and offline and the changing nature of embodied experience. Examples are drawn from a wide range of settings, including ethnographies of scientific institutions, television, social media and locally based gift-giving networks. - See more at: http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/ethnography-for-the-internet-9780857855701/#sthash.q1UHC7O1.dpuf

luiy's insight:

1 Introduction
2 The E3 Internet: The Embedded, Embodied, Everyday Internet
3 Ethnographic Strategies for the Embedded, Embodied, Everyday Internet
4 Observing and Experiencing Online/Offline Connections
5 Connective Ethnography in Complex Institutional Landscapes
6 The Internet in Ethnographies of the Everyday
7 Conclusion
References


Index - See more at: http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/ethnography-for-the-internet-9780857855701/#sthash.q1UHC7O1.dpuf

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Data Everywhere: #DataAnthropology, Quantified Self, Machine Data, Human Centered Design, and more | #bigdata #opendata

Data Everywhere: #DataAnthropology, Quantified Self, Machine Data, Human Centered Design, and more | #bigdata #opendata | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
In mid-February, Strata returns to Santa Clara for its fourth year. Since the conference started, it’s grown in size and scope, broadening its focus to include design...

Via Pierre Levy
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The Story of Humanity with Game Based #Learning | #dataviz #DH

The Story of Humanity with Game Based #Learning | #dataviz #DH | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Master 8 Periods of History with The Big History Project What do you get when you cross a maveric...

Via Chris Carter, Rui Guimarães Lima
luiy's insight:

The public course takes about 8 hours to finish and divides history into 8 “thresholds,” periods in which critical events happened to alter the course of all history.  Each threshold module contains multimedia elements to fully explore the time period from a variety of disciplines, especially science.  The public user has the option of taking quizzes and earning badges for each module passed.  At the end of the course, the user can earn the title of Certified Big Historian.  (The first 10,000 users to do so get a free sticker.)

 

By combining gamification elements with fascinating (sometimes mind-blowing) content, BHP manages to achieve something a lot of history teachers never could–it makes history fun.  The videos are engaging, with excellent graphics and music.  The material is presented with a minimum of jargon and the site is easy to navigate.  And while we won’t say the quizzes are easy, the user does have a chance to retake them until they reach a high enough score for the badge.  (Don’t ask us how many tries it took to score 100% on the Big Bang badge….)

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Chris Carter's curator insight, January 12, 7:30 PM

13.7 billion years ... wow!

Chris Carter's comment, January 18, 3:24 AM
Rui Guimarães Lima, you are heartily welcome! My friend and colleague teaches Big History here in Shanghai. We are the first non-US overseas school to do so. Exciting!
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The World Religions Tree I #dataviz #anthropology #diffusion

The World Religions Tree I #dataviz #anthropology #diffusion | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).


Via Seth Dixon, Glenis Joyce
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CT Blake's curator insight, October 13, 9:15 AM

Gives students the idea of how complex the background of modern religions are.

Olivia G Torres's curator insight, November 30, 6:18 PM

This was super awesome!! It's a diagram that lets you zoom into the branches that are religion. Its really cool to see how different religions derived and how some are connected. I think it's really cool to see how many different branches have been made through out the years and just how far back religions went. I really like that you can see the long and sometimes lost roots of the religion.

Abby Laybourn's curator insight, December 10, 1:25 PM

Although this was kind of hard to read it was interesting to see how different religions are related and where they stem from. 

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The Emerging Science of Computational #Anthropology | #DH #dataviz

The Emerging Science of Computational #Anthropology | #DH #dataviz | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

The increasing availability of big data from mobile phones and location-based apps has triggered a revolution in the understanding of human mobility patterns. This data shows the ebb and flow of the daily commute in and out of cities, the pattern of travel around the world and even how disease can spread through cities via their transport systems.

 

So there is considerable interest in looking more closely at human mobility patterns to see just how well it can be predicted and how these predictions might be used in everything from disease control and city planning to traffic forecasting and location-based advertising.

Today we get an insight into the kind of detailed that is possible thanks to the work of Zimo Yang at Microsoft research in Beijing and a few pals. These guys start with the hypothesis that people who live in a city have a pattern of mobility that is significantly different from those who are merely visiting. By dividing travellers into locals and non-locals, their ability to predict where people are likely to visit dramatically improves.


Via Ashish Umre
luiy's insight:

The question that Zimo and co want to answer is the following: given a particular user and their current location, where are they most likely to visit in the near future? In practice, that means analysing the user’s data, such as their hometown and the locations recently visited, and coming up with a list of other locations that they are likely to visit based on the type of people who visited these locations in the past.

Zimo and co used their training dataset to learn the mobility pattern of locals and non-locals and the popularity of the locations they visited. The team then applied this to the test dataset to see whether their algorithm was able to predict where locals and non-locals were likely to visit.

 

They found that their best results came from analysing the pattern of behaviour of a particular individual and estimating the extent to which this person behaves like a local. That produced a weighting called the indigenization coefficient that the researchers could then use to determine the mobility patterns this person was likely to follow in future.

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Barnes, un #anthropologue à la « découverte » des réseaux sociaux | #DH #sna

Barnes, un #anthropologue à la « découverte » des réseaux sociaux | #DH #sna | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

Si l’on ne prête attention qu’à leur vogue récente, les « réseaux sociaux » auraient été inventés il y a une dizaine d’années en Californie par les fondateurs de Friendster, MySpace, LinkedIn, et bien sûr Facebook et Twitter. Mais si on se fie au contraire à la perspective théorique et méthodologique dessinée par la plupart des ouvrages d’introduction à l’analyse des réseaux sociaux(Wasserman et Faust, 1994 ; Lazega, 1995; Degenne et Forsé, 2004_ENREF_11 ; ENREF_9 Mercklé, 2011 ; Scott, 2012), leur existence serait en réalité aussi ancienne que l’humanité elle-même : à partir du moment où il y a des interactions entre individus et entre entités sociales, il y a des réseaux sociaux. Les approches historiographiques (Lemercier, 2005) font l’hypothèse qu’il y en avait dans la France du XIXe siècle (Gribaudi et Blum, 1990), dans l’Italie du XVe siècle (Padgett et Ansell, 1993), voire dans la Rome antique (Alexander et Danowski, 1990) ou le Néolithique méditerranéen (Brysbaert, 2011). Il serait plus exact de dire en réalité que ces approches ont fait, depuis une vingtaine d’années, l’hypothèse qu’il était pertinent de penser et de représenter sous la forme de « réseaux sociaux » des structures de relations sociales aussi anciennes que celles de la Renaissance ou du Néolithique.....

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Christine Hine on virtual #ethnography’s E3 Internet | #cyberanthropology

Christine Hine on virtual #ethnography’s E3 Internet | #cyberanthropology | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Christine Hine is an early pioneer of virtual ethnography and has been at the forefront of movements towards redefining ethnography for the digital age. She is currently a Reader at the University ...
luiy's insight:

HF: What do you think are the key challenges that ethnographers face in trying to study the Internet today?


CH: Robinson and Schulz, in their 2009 paper, describe evolving forms of ethnographic practice in response to the Internet and digitally mediated environments. They divide this into three phases that include a) pioneering, where cyberethnographers focused on issues of identity play and a separation between online and offline identities 2) legitimizing (in which my own work is situated) where ethnographers explored the use of offline methods in the online sphere and, 3) multi-modal approaches where ethnographers are concerned with how participants combine different modes of communication.

 

I believe that we are still in the process of having to legitimize cyber ethnography and that multi-modal approaches are a worthy goal for virtual ethnography. The key challenge here is in understanding how to do multi-modal studies. This is especially challenging since the ethnographer’s toolkit changes with every new setting. We don’t know what that toolkit consists of because every time we do a new study, we have to choose what combination of sites, methods, writing practices and techniques we need to use.

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The #anthropology of an equation. Sieves, spam filters, agentive #algorithms, and #ontologies of transformation | Journal of #Ethnographic Theory

The #anthropology of an equation. Sieves, spam filters, agentive #algorithms, and #ontologies of transformation | Journal of #Ethnographic Theory | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
The anthropology of an equation. Sieves, spam filters, agentive algorithms, and ontologies of transformation

Via Adelina Silva
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