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antropologiaNet, dataviz, collective intelligence, algorithms, social learning, social change, digital humanities
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The #CollectiveIntelligence Handbook | #openaccess

The #CollectiveIntelligence Handbook | #openaccess | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

Collective intelligence has existed at least as long as humans have, because families, armies, countries, and companies have all--at least sometimes--acted collectively in ways that seem intelligent. But in the last decade or so a new kind of collective intelligence has emerged: groups of people and computers, connected by the Internet, collectively doing intelligent things. In order to understand the possibilities and constraints of these new kinds of intelligence, a new interdisciplinary field is emerging.

 

This book will introduce readers to many disciplinary perspectives on behavior that is bothcollective and intelligent.  By collective, we mean groups of individual actors, including, for example, people, computational agents, and organizations.  By intelligent, we mean that the collective behavior of the group exhibits characteristics such as, for example, perception, learning, judgment, or problem solving.

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#Software Takes Command. Book by Lev Manovich I #OpenAccess

#Software Takes Command. Book by Lev Manovich I #OpenAccess | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

This new book from the celebrated author of The Language of New Media is the first to offer a rigorous theory of the technology we all use daily - software for media authoring, access, and sharing.

What motivated developers in the 1960s and ‘70s to create the concepts and techniques that now underlie contemporary applications like Photoshop, Illustrator, and Final Cut?

 

How do these tools shape the visual aesthetics of contemporary media and design? What happens to the idea of a “medium” after previously media-specific tools have been simulated and extended into software?

 

Lev Manovich answers these questions through detailed analysis of key media applications such as Photoshop and After Effects, popular web services such as Google Earth, and milestone projects in design, motion graphics, and interactive environments.

 

Software Takes Command is a must for scholars, designers, technologists, and artists concerned with contemporary media and digital culture.

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Debates in the Digital Humanities | #DH #book #openaccess

Debates in the Digital Humanities | #DH #book #openaccess | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via Jim Lerman, ernestprats, Gabby G, sandra alvaro
luiy's insight:
2013 OPEN-ACCESS EDITION

Published in January 2013, the open-access edition of Debates in the Digital Humanitiesmarked not just the opening up of the printed text, but also the debut of a custom-built social reading platform. Going beyond the basic task of making the contents of the printed edition accessible, the OA platform makes the text interactive, with key features that allow readers to interact with the text by marking passages as interesting and adding terms to a crowdsourced index.

The OA platform marks a significant shift for Debates in the Digital Humanities in that it moves it from a single printed edition of collected essays to an expanded, ongoing digital publication stream that the Press plans to draw upon to publish both future editions of collection and other publications on more focused DH topics. While the first iteration of the digital platform contains only the content of the printed text, an expanded edition with new additions will appear in March 2013.

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Gabby G's curator insight, March 30, 2014 5:09 AM

 

@ernestprats Thank you for posting this!

 

To provide some context about this book, here is an excerpt  from the book's editor, Matthew K. Gold, via his blog http://blog.mkgold.net/

 

"A group of scholars – from both within and outside of the field – have assembled answers to some of those questions in a volume that I have recently edited for the University of Minnesota Press titled Debates in the Digital Humanities. In that book, contributors critique the digital humanities for a series of faults: not only paying inadequate attention to race, class, gender, and sexuality, but in some cases explicitly seeking to elide cultural issues from the frame of analysis; reinforcing the traditional academic valuation of research over teaching; and allowing the seductions of information visualization to paper over differences in material contexts."

 

This was part of a talk he gave at the 2012 MLA Panel "Debates in the Digital Humanities". See more here: http://blog.mkgold.net/2012/01/10/whose-revolution-toward-a-more-equitable-digital-humanities/ ;

Francisco Restivo's curator insight, March 31, 2014 9:45 AM

The digital vs. the analogue: Are we loosing something?

sandra alvaro's curator insight, March 31, 2014 11:24 AM

Encompassing new technologies, research methods, and opportunities for collaborative scholarship and open-source peer review, as well as innovative ways of sharing knowledge and teaching, the digital humanities promises to transform the liberal arts—and perhaps the university itself.