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Ethnography for the Internet | #Anthropology #CyberEthnography

Ethnography for the Internet | #Anthropology #CyberEthnography | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

The internet has become embedded into our daily lives, no longer an esoteric phenomenon, but instead an unremarkable way of carrying out our interactions with one another. Online and offline are interwoven in everyday experience. Using the internet has become accepted as a way of being present in the world, rather than a means of accessing some discrete virtual domain. Ethnographers of these contemporary Internet-infused societies consequently find themselves facing serious methodological dilemmas: where should they go, what should they do there and how can they acquire robust knowledge about what people do in, through and with the internet?

This book presents an overview of the challenges faced by ethnographers who wish to understand activities that involve the internet. Suitable for both new and experienced ethnographers, it explores both methodological principles and practical strategies for coming to terms with the definition of field sites, the connections between online and offline and the changing nature of embodied experience. Examples are drawn from a wide range of settings, including ethnographies of scientific institutions, television, social media and locally based gift-giving networks. - See more at: http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/ethnography-for-the-internet-9780857855701/#sthash.q1UHC7O1.dpuf

luiy's insight:

1 Introduction
2 The E3 Internet: The Embedded, Embodied, Everyday Internet
3 Ethnographic Strategies for the Embedded, Embodied, Everyday Internet
4 Observing and Experiencing Online/Offline Connections
5 Connective Ethnography in Complex Institutional Landscapes
6 The Internet in Ethnographies of the Everyday
7 Conclusion
References


Index - See more at: http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/ethnography-for-the-internet-9780857855701/#sthash.q1UHC7O1.dpuf

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Distributed Cognition Theory – Hollan, Hutchins, Kirsh I #Ethnography #Interactions

Distributed Cognition Theory – Hollan, Hutchins, Kirsh I #Ethnography #Interactions | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Hollan et al propose the distributed cognition theory as a theoretical foundation for human-computer interaction research and a fertile framework for designing and evaluating digital artifacts. It is tailored to understand ...

Via Spaceweaver
luiy's insight:

It was interesting to experience how research results in better graphical user interfaces, specifically to software and the web. While I was reading the paper I continually reflected and connected to connect to my role as a teacher, the operation of TELEs, web design and zelfstudie.be, the website I founded in 2000. A few points triggered me:

 

A distributed cognition approach :

Socially Distributed Cognition: “social organization is itself a form of cognitive architecture” and “cognitive processes are socially distributed across the members of a group.It is a broader conception that includes phenomena that emerge in social interactions as well as interactions between people and structure in their environments”.Embodied Cognition: “so well-designed work materials becomeintegrated into the way people think, see, and control activities”  (Eg: blind person’s cane).
Indeed, distance learning proposes other pedagogy than f2f. By using web conferencing software in my lesson, ask questions using the chat, the alert button, the microphone. They might ask questions they wouldn’t ask in other circumstances and vice versa. Culture and Cognition: “the environment people are embedded in is, among other things, a reservoir of resources for learning, problem solving, and reasoning”Ethnography of Distributed Cognitive Systems: this one was extremely interesting. 

- See more at: http://www.innovation-change.eu/learning/distributed-cognition-theory-hollan-hutchins-kirsh/#sthash.CiXkAzfX.dpuf

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Christine Hine on virtual #ethnography’s E3 Internet | #cyberanthropology

Christine Hine on virtual #ethnography’s E3 Internet | #cyberanthropology | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Christine Hine is an early pioneer of virtual ethnography and has been at the forefront of movements towards redefining ethnography for the digital age. She is currently a Reader at the University ...
luiy's insight:

HF: What do you think are the key challenges that ethnographers face in trying to study the Internet today?


CH: Robinson and Schulz, in their 2009 paper, describe evolving forms of ethnographic practice in response to the Internet and digitally mediated environments. They divide this into three phases that include a) pioneering, where cyberethnographers focused on issues of identity play and a separation between online and offline identities 2) legitimizing (in which my own work is situated) where ethnographers explored the use of offline methods in the online sphere and, 3) multi-modal approaches where ethnographers are concerned with how participants combine different modes of communication.

 

I believe that we are still in the process of having to legitimize cyber ethnography and that multi-modal approaches are a worthy goal for virtual ethnography. The key challenge here is in understanding how to do multi-modal studies. This is especially challenging since the ethnographer’s toolkit changes with every new setting. We don’t know what that toolkit consists of because every time we do a new study, we have to choose what combination of sites, methods, writing practices and techniques we need to use.

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#Urban Characters: Exploring the places and #objects that make each city unique | #ethnography

#Urban Characters: Exploring the places and #objects that make each city unique | #ethnography | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
A salute to those special places—some humble, some utterly utilitarian—that give a city its unique personality and collective soul.

 

The six places and objects shown at the link are urban amenities of a particular kind, but really they’re much more than that. These are the distinct features in the landscape that give a city its unique character. Every city has them. They can be supremely useful (the parkettes in Toronto, Pike Place Market in Seattle, Washington, D.C.’s fabulous subway stations) or gloriously idiosyncratic (the hidden staircases in Los Angeles, Pittsburgh’s charming Inclines, the incongruous gas lamps of sunny San Diego).

All of them, however, play a beloved civic role that transcends their mere function, lending a kind of quiet poetry to daily life, grace notes to the grind. Six writers and designers, one from each city, reflect on these special characters in the urban landscape...


Via Lauren Moss, ParadigmGallery, luiy
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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, September 26, 2013 2:54 PM

This thought from the article sums it up for me...."believe that we can be great and that change is possible and that we can achieve it."