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#BigData, new epistemologies and paradigm shifts | #socialscience #DH

#BigData, new epistemologies and paradigm shifts | #socialscience #DH | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

Whilst Jim Gray envisages the fourth paradigm of science to be data-intensive and a radically new extension of the established scientific method, others suggest that Big Data ushers in a new era of empiricism, wherein the volume of data, accompanied by techniques that can reveal their inherent truth, enables data to speak for themselves free of theory. The empiricist view has gained credence outside of the academy, especially within business circles, but its ideas have also taken root in the new field of data science and other sciences. In contrast, a new mode of data-driven science is emerging within traditional disciplines in the academy. In this section, the epistemological claims of both approaches are critically examined, mindful of the different drivers and aspirations of business and the academy, with the former preoccupied with employing data analytics to identify new products, markets and opportunities rather than advance knowledge per se, and the latter focused on how best to make sense of the world and to determine explanations as to phenomena and processes.

 

http://bds.sagepub.com/content/1/1/2053951714528481.full

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#Bigdata, language and the death of the theorist | #DH #algorithms

#Bigdata, language and the death of the theorist | #DH #algorithms | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Plenty of people have foreseen the death of the scientific theory at the hands of big data analysis, but when computers become good enough to understand literature, art and human history, will it spell the end for the humanities academic?
luiy's insight:

A lot has been written about the ways that big data has changed scientific enquiry, but as supercomputers increase in power and the tools to use them become less obtuse, whole new academic disciplines are beginning to feel the benefits of crunching data.

 

Believe it or not, some people even think we can forecast the future with big data. Predicting world-changing events is a possibility, some claim, if you treat society and history like a big data problem. It's how big data analyst Kalev Leetaru found where Osama bin Laden had been hiding, in a way.

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#Privacy, Anonymity, and #BigData in the Social Sciences | #dh #MOOC

#Privacy, Anonymity, and #BigData in the Social Sciences | #dh #MOOC | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
A recent article suggests that open science may be irreconcilable with anonymous data, requiring a reconsideration of how we protect privacy in educational data.
luiy's insight:

The short version: many people have called for making science more open and transparent by sharing data and posting data openly. This allows researchers to check each other's work and to aggregate smaller datasets into larger ones. One saying that I'm fond of is: "the best use of your dataset is something that someone else will come up with." The problem is that increasingly, all of this data is about us. In education, it's about our demographics, our learning behavior, and our performance. Across the social sciences, it's about our health, our beliefs, and our social connections. Sharing and merging data adds to the risk of disclosing those data. 

 

The article shares a case study of our efforts to strike a balance between anonymity and open science by de-identifying a dataset of learner data from HarvardX and releasing it to the public. In order to de-identify the data to a standard that we thought was reasonably resistant to reidentification efforts, we had to delete some records and blur some variables. If a learner's combination of identifying variables was too unique, we either deleted the record or scrubbed the data to make it look less unique. The result was suitable for release (in our view), but as we looked more closely at the released dataset, it wasn't suitable for science. We scrubbed the data to the point where it was problematically dissimilar from the original dataset. If you do research using our data, you can't be sure if your findings are legitimate or an artifact of de-identification. 

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Le numérique réinvente la consommation culturelle | #DH #musées

Le numérique réinvente la consommation culturelle | #DH #musées | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Musées en ligne, création artistique digitale, e-commerce de l'art... la multiplication des expériences numériques dans le monde de la culture recoupe des réalités fort diverses. Et la nébuleuse des initiatives rend la lecture de ce secteur naissant éminemment complexe. Comment repenser l'offre culturelle à l'heure de sa dématérialisation ? Comment répondre aux nouveaux besoins d'un « consommateur » d'art ultra-connecté ?
luiy's insight:

S'appuyant justement sur l'interaction visiteur et l'expérience immersive, le Centre Pompidou a lancé « Éduque le Troll », en 2012, son premier Alternate Reality Game (ARG). Ces jeux en réalité alternée aux fonctions pédagogiques et ludiques sont fort prisés des musées. Il en est de même pour les serious games, jeux intelligents interactifs développés par les châteaux de Versailles et de Fontainebleau. Le transmédia a également la faveur des lieux patrimoniaux.

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Atlas of Digital Humanities and Social Science | #DH #dataviz

Atlas of Digital Humanities and Social Science | #DH #dataviz | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

A bit of history

 

In 2013, GrinUGR – Collaboratory for digital cultures in social sciences and humanities started a research project, funded by CEI-BioTic Granada, with the purpose of capturing information about centers, projects and researchers working on Digital Humanities and Social Science. With this name we tried to include not only Humanities but all the Social Sciences approaches (as described for example as eResearch). As a result of this project, in spring 2013, GrinUGR collaborators started to collect cases worldwide and to design the infrastructure to visualize this information on a map. Around 300 cases were collected, including items in Spanish, English and other languages.

 

On June 10, 2013, on the occasion of the celebration of the Día de Humanidades Digitales en español, Élika Ortega and Silvia Gutiérrez launched a questionnaire to collect information on digital humanists (around 80 people responded to it). This initiative was called MapaHD and has been included as a chapter in a forthcoming book edited by GrinUGR and as a conference paper in the next DH Conference in Lausanne.

 

In January 2014, I proposed Elika to create a new resource titled Atlas of Digital Humanities and Social Science using the infrastructure developed by GrinUGR to develop a public database of cases following the initial aims of GrinUGR and MapaHD. As a result today, after 2 months, the Atlas includes 130 researchers, 41 projects, 15 centers and 11 different resources.

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Francisco Restivo's curator insight, May 24, 2014 10:56 AM

Community building. Thank you.

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Marlowe : Vers un générateur d’expériences de pensée sur des dossiers #complexes | #DH #AI #agents

Marlowe : Vers un générateur d’expériences de pensée sur des dossiers #complexes | #DH #AI #agents | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Marlowe, Toward A Generator of Thought Experiments on Complex Files: An author, an experimenter and a reviewer of the computer programs, Marlowe and Prospero, contribute in this article, respectively and successively, an extensive and detailed presentation of Marlowe, a report on what it is like to interact with Marlowe and a review of the recently-published work, by the first author, describing the development of Prospero for the Analyse of complex dossiers of texts concerning a social controversy, and Prospero's extension and adaptation with Marlowe to direct natural language dialog with researchers concerning specific complex dossiers.
luiy's insight:

Comme première définition du type d’expériences engendrées par Marlowe, on peut parler de « dialogues avec un ensemble de mémoires externes ». Marlowe (nom de code : MRLW) est en effet dépositaire de structures de représentation et de stocks de connaissances qui permettent de lui déléguer des tâches d’enquête fastidieuses. Ses ressources étant en grande partie externalisées, MRLW peut permettre un travail collectif via le cumul de concepts et d’exemples, de règles et de procédures éprouvées sur différents dossiers. Contrairement au chercheur humain, MRLW peut explorer, et exploiter, sans autre limite que les capacités de la machine qui l’abrite, d’innombrables combinaisons. Comme la restitution pure et simple de l’ensemble des combinaisons ou des chemins possibles n’aurait aucun sens – augmentant considérablement le travail interprétatif du chercheur – le dialogue sert de cadrage, ou plutôt d’espace de négociation des prises pertinentes par lesquelles s’affirme la maîtrise d’un ou de plusieurs dossiers. MRLW joue son rôle de maintien de la réflexivité à partir de quatre grands types de fonctionnalités :

 

- des accès documentés à des informations difficiles à extraire manuellement (c’est-à-dire par la recherche visuelle dans de multiples fenêtres) ;

 

- des opérations d’évaluation et de synthèse offrant des angles de vue diversifiés sur un même corpus ;

 

- des modèles ou des espaces de calcul aidant à éprouver la consistance des interprétations du chercheur ;

 

- des outils de contrôle sur la composition du corpus, le cadre d’analyse et les priorités du chercheur.

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Digital humanities and e-Science | #DH

The 1st Workshop on Digital Humanities and e-Science will be held as part of e-Science 2014, with the endorsement of AHDig. The motivation for this workshop starts at the realization that there is an intersection between Digital Humanities and e-Science. The workshop proposes to explore the extent of this intersection, aiming at expanding the common ground, even if the communities have not agreed upon the exact boundari With this in mind, this event will present and discuss research in the Humanities with intensive participation of computer resources.


Via Andrea Naranjo, Celeste G. Box (@mcgbox), Pierre Levy
luiy's insight:

Call for Papers

 

For the purpose of the workshop, “Digital Humanities” comprehends the interactions between Information Technology and Computer Science on the one hand, and Philosophy, History, Geography, Social Sciences, Linguistics and Letters, Education, Economics, Law, Anthropology, Archaeology, Communication Studies and Information Sciences on the other hand. By “intensive computational resources” we understand the following scenarios:

 

- Data-intensive applications.

- Symbolic processing and information extraction of structural features in data usually organized in corpora of texts and other representations.

- Network analysis of internet-based applications.

- Distributed computation and high-performance computing in datadriven studies.

 

 

Submissions to DHandES should be sent to Easychair.org, through https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=dhandes2014,
until May 12th, 2014 (see also other [Important Dates])

 

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#Épistémologies digitales des sciences humaines et sociales | #DH

#Épistémologies digitales des sciences humaines et sociales | #DH | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via Pierre Levy
luiy's insight:

Les humanités numériques désigneraient un ensemble de pratiques visant à utiliser les médias ou les outils numériques pour analyser des données et/ou diffuser les connaissances produites. De façon générale, nous constatons que la notion de média est insuffisante : en quoi un nouveau canal de diffusion des connaissances pourrait à lui seul transformer des pratiques et des problématiques de chercheurs ? En fait, parce qu’elles sont intimement liées à l’écriture, instrument intellectuel par excellence, les techniques récentes font émerger de nouveaux objets d’études, de nouvelles façons d’aborder des problématiques anciennes, en même temps qu’elles nous offrent un regard renouvelé sur des pratiques que nous croyions banales, ne méritant pas d’être commentées ni mises en perspective. Bien au-delà des humanités numériques, c’est donc l’ensemble des sciences humaines qui subit des transformations majeures.

 

------------------------------------------- 

 

Problèmes et concepts

 

- Éric Guichard, L’internet et les épistémologies des sciences humaines et sociales [Texte intégral] 

 

- Thierry Poibeau, La linguistique est-elle soluble dans la statistique ? [Texte intégral] 

 

- Stéphane Lamassé et Philippe Rygiel, Nouvelles frontières de l’historien [Texte intégral] 

 

- Emmanuel Lazega et Christophe Prieur, Sociologie néostructurale, disciplines sociales et systèmes complexes [Texte intégral] 

 

- Paul Mathias, Les internautes ont-ils une âme ? [Texte intégral] 

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Barnes, un #anthropologue à la « découverte » des réseaux sociaux | #DH #sna

Barnes, un #anthropologue à la « découverte » des réseaux sociaux | #DH #sna | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

Si l’on ne prête attention qu’à leur vogue récente, les « réseaux sociaux » auraient été inventés il y a une dizaine d’années en Californie par les fondateurs de Friendster, MySpace, LinkedIn, et bien sûr Facebook et Twitter. Mais si on se fie au contraire à la perspective théorique et méthodologique dessinée par la plupart des ouvrages d’introduction à l’analyse des réseaux sociaux(Wasserman et Faust, 1994 ; Lazega, 1995; Degenne et Forsé, 2004_ENREF_11 ; ENREF_9 Mercklé, 2011 ; Scott, 2012), leur existence serait en réalité aussi ancienne que l’humanité elle-même : à partir du moment où il y a des interactions entre individus et entre entités sociales, il y a des réseaux sociaux. Les approches historiographiques (Lemercier, 2005) font l’hypothèse qu’il y en avait dans la France du XIXe siècle (Gribaudi et Blum, 1990), dans l’Italie du XVe siècle (Padgett et Ansell, 1993), voire dans la Rome antique (Alexander et Danowski, 1990) ou le Néolithique méditerranéen (Brysbaert, 2011). Il serait plus exact de dire en réalité que ces approches ont fait, depuis une vingtaine d’années, l’hypothèse qu’il était pertinent de penser et de représenter sous la forme de « réseaux sociaux » des structures de relations sociales aussi anciennes que celles de la Renaissance ou du Néolithique.....

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Digital research #tools | #dh

Digital research #tools | #dh | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via Pierre Levy
luiy's insight:

This version of DiRT has been superseded by Bamboo DiRT, developed by Quinn Dombrowski and Project Bamboo.  Bamboo DiRT makes several improvements over the old DiRT and is much more current.  No new information will be added here as of 1/9/2012, but this wiki is still available for historical purposes. For more information, please see this message. 


Mew LINK:http://dirt.projectbamboo.org/

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Pierre Levy's curator insight, February 11, 2014 7:39 PM

Extensive trove of resources for digital humanities

sandra alvaro's curator insight, February 12, 2014 5:32 AM

wiki with resources for digital humanities projects

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The Story of Humanity with Game Based #Learning | #dataviz #DH

The Story of Humanity with Game Based #Learning | #dataviz #DH | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Master 8 Periods of History with The Big History Project What do you get when you cross a maveric...

Via Chris Carter, Rui Guimarães Lima
luiy's insight:

The public course takes about 8 hours to finish and divides history into 8 “thresholds,” periods in which critical events happened to alter the course of all history.  Each threshold module contains multimedia elements to fully explore the time period from a variety of disciplines, especially science.  The public user has the option of taking quizzes and earning badges for each module passed.  At the end of the course, the user can earn the title of Certified Big Historian.  (The first 10,000 users to do so get a free sticker.)

 

By combining gamification elements with fascinating (sometimes mind-blowing) content, BHP manages to achieve something a lot of history teachers never could–it makes history fun.  The videos are engaging, with excellent graphics and music.  The material is presented with a minimum of jargon and the site is easy to navigate.  And while we won’t say the quizzes are easy, the user does have a chance to retake them until they reach a high enough score for the badge.  (Don’t ask us how many tries it took to score 100% on the Big Bang badge….)

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Chris Carter's curator insight, January 12, 2014 7:30 PM

13.7 billion years ... wow!

Chris Carter's comment, January 18, 2014 3:24 AM
Rui Guimarães Lima, you are heartily welcome! My friend and colleague teaches Big History here in Shanghai. We are the first non-US overseas school to do so. Exciting!
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#BigData and Digital Humanities: From social computing to the challenges of connected culture I #DH

#BigData and Digital Humanities: From social computing to the challenges of connected culture I #DH | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via Pierre Levy
luiy's insight:

Big Data is the new medium of the second decade of the twenty-first century: a new set of computing technologies that, like the ones that preceded it, is changing the way in which we access reality. Now that the Social Web has become the new laboratory for cultural production, the Digital Humanities are focusing on analysing the production and distribution of cultural products on a mass scale, in order to participate in designing and questioning the means that have made it possible. As such, their approach has shifted to looking at how culture is produced and distributed, and this brings them up against the challenges of a new connected culture.

 

5,264,802 text documents, 1,735,435 audio files, 1,403,785 videos, and over two billion web pages that can be accessed through the WayBack Machine make up the inventory of the Internet Archive at the time of writing. Then there are also the works of over 7,500 avant-garde artists archived as videos, pdfs, sound files, and television and radio programmes on UBUWEB, the more than 4,346,267 entries in 241 languages submitted by the 127,156 active users that make up Wikipedia, and the ongoing contributions of more than 500 million users on Twitter. And these are just a few examples of the new virtual spaces where knowledge is stored and shared: open access, collaboratively created digital archives, wikis and social networks in which all types of hybridisations coexist, and where encounters between different types of media and content take place. As a whole, they generate a complex environment that reveals our culture as a constantly evolving process.

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Annotation Studio: suite of #collaborative web-based annotation #tools | #DH

Annotation Studio: suite of #collaborative web-based annotation #tools | #DH | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

Annotation Studio in the Digital Humanities

 

The most significant difference between Annotation Studio and other digital annotation projects is its emphasis on student-centered design and pedagogy. Most other annotation tools assume user familiarity with TEI, and a well-developed understanding of the relationships between literary sources, manuscripts, editions, and adaptations. Annotation Studio makes sophisticated yet easy-to-use commenting tools immediately accessible to students with no prior experience with close textual analysis or TEI.

 

However, while we believe Annotation Studio provides many unique affordances, we also see it as part of a larger conversation concerning annotation in the digital humanities. Accordingly, we have listed what we think are some of the most exciting projects occupying the annotation space, which bear both similarities and differences to the aims and formal qualities of our tool.

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Online collaboration: Scientists and the social network | #science #socialmedia

Online collaboration: Scientists and the social network | #science #socialmedia | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Giant academic social networks have taken off to a degree that no one expected even a few years ago. A Nature survey explores why.
luiy's insight:

The results confirm that ResearchGate is certainly well-known (see ‘Remarkable reach’, and full results online at go.nature.com/jvx7pl). More than 88% of scientists and engineers said that they were aware of it — slightly more than had heard of Google+ and Twitter — with little difference between countries. Just under half said that they visit regularly, putting the site second only to Google Scholar, and ahead of Facebook and LinkedIn. Almost 29% of regular visitors had signed up for a profile on ResearchGate in the past year.

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Francisco Restivo's curator insight, August 23, 2014 6:12 PM

Scientists and social scientists use social networks differently. But they use!

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How Yahoo Research Labs Studies Culture as a Formal Computational Concept | #SNA #DH

How Yahoo Research Labs Studies Culture as a Formal Computational Concept | #SNA #DH | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
The ultimate goal: a truly computational understanding of human society, say Yahoo’s computational anthropologists.
luiy's insight:

Today, Luca Maria Aiello at Yahoo Labs in Barcelona, Spain, and a couple of pals, change that. They tease apart the nature of the links that form on social networks and say these atoms fall into three different categories. They also show how to extract this information automatically and then characterize the relationships according to the combination of atoms that exist between individuals. Their ultimate goal: to turn anthropology into a full-blooded subdiscipline of computer science.

 

Aiello and co used two data sets from a pair of large social networks. The first consists of over 1 million messages sent between 500,000 pairs of users of the aNobii social network, which people use to talk about books they have read. The second is a set of 100,000 anonymized user pairs who commented on each other’s photos on Flickr, sending around 2 million messages in total.

 

The team analyzes these messages based on the type of information they convey, which they divide into three groups. The first type of information is related to social status; messages displaying appreciation or announcing the creation of the social tie such as a follow or like. For example, a user might say a photograph is “an excellent shot” or say they’ve followed somebody or acknowledged attention they’ve got by thanking them for visiting a site.

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Francisco Restivo's curator insight, August 20, 2014 6:51 AM

Alex Pentland would call this Social Physics.

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The Emerging Science of Computational #Anthropology | #DH #dataviz

The Emerging Science of Computational #Anthropology | #DH #dataviz | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

The increasing availability of big data from mobile phones and location-based apps has triggered a revolution in the understanding of human mobility patterns. This data shows the ebb and flow of the daily commute in and out of cities, the pattern of travel around the world and even how disease can spread through cities via their transport systems.

 

So there is considerable interest in looking more closely at human mobility patterns to see just how well it can be predicted and how these predictions might be used in everything from disease control and city planning to traffic forecasting and location-based advertising.

Today we get an insight into the kind of detailed that is possible thanks to the work of Zimo Yang at Microsoft research in Beijing and a few pals. These guys start with the hypothesis that people who live in a city have a pattern of mobility that is significantly different from those who are merely visiting. By dividing travellers into locals and non-locals, their ability to predict where people are likely to visit dramatically improves.


Via Ashish Umre
luiy's insight:

The question that Zimo and co want to answer is the following: given a particular user and their current location, where are they most likely to visit in the near future? In practice, that means analysing the user’s data, such as their hometown and the locations recently visited, and coming up with a list of other locations that they are likely to visit based on the type of people who visited these locations in the past.

Zimo and co used their training dataset to learn the mobility pattern of locals and non-locals and the popularity of the locations they visited. The team then applied this to the test dataset to see whether their algorithm was able to predict where locals and non-locals were likely to visit.

 

They found that their best results came from analysing the pattern of behaviour of a particular individual and estimating the extent to which this person behaves like a local. That produced a weighting called the indigenization coefficient that the researchers could then use to determine the mobility patterns this person was likely to follow in future.

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Lincoln #Logarithms: Finding Meaning in Sermons | #dataviz #sna #DH

Lincoln #Logarithms: Finding Meaning in Sermons | #dataviz #sna #DH | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

The content and the tools


We explored the power and possibility of four digital tools—MALLET, Voyant, Paper Machines, andViewshare.  MALLET, Paper Machines, and Voyant all examine text.  They show how words are arranged in texts, their frequency, and their proximity. Voyant and Paper Machines also allow users to make visualizations of word patterns. Viewshare allows users to create timelines, maps, and charts of bodies of material. In this project, we wanted to experiment with understanding what these tools, which are in part created to reveal, could and could not show us in a small, but rich corpus.  What we have produced is an exploration of the possibilities and the constraints of these tools as applied to this collection.

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Why #BigData Requires the #SocialSciences

Why #BigData Requires the #SocialSciences | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Courtesy of Hallam Stevens | Smart Data Collective This is the first in a series of posts that will examine the big data phenomenon from the point...
luiy's insight:

The social sciences have spent a lot of time thinking about the relationship between technology and society. Big data are, of course, part of technological system. They emerge from computers, databases, and the World Wide Web. But, big data are not only a technological phenomenon. Data are collected for particular purposes (eg. because they are valuable) by and for particular individuals or groups. In other words, which data is collected, how it is collected, from where and who, and how much, depends not just on technological capability but on the social and political interests at stake (a point that has recently been recognized by the White House in its report and in the conference on 'The social, cultural, and ethical dimensions of Big Data').

 

This is typical of other kinds of technological systems. The form taken by televisions, bridges, power tools, or missiles doesn’t just depend on technical or engineering questions, but on social and political interests. If we want to understand why these things are the way were are, we have to understand them not merely as technological objects, but also as ‘social’ objects. All but the most superficial analysis of data is going to need to take account of how, why, and for what reason a particular set of data came to be. 

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Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, May 23, 2014 2:38 AM

Cómo el uso de los big data requiere el conocimiento de las ciencias sociales

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Debates in the Digital Humanities | #DH #book #openaccess

Debates in the Digital Humanities | #DH #book #openaccess | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via Jim Lerman, ernestprats, Gabby G, sandra alvaro
luiy's insight:
2013 OPEN-ACCESS EDITION

Published in January 2013, the open-access edition of Debates in the Digital Humanitiesmarked not just the opening up of the printed text, but also the debut of a custom-built social reading platform. Going beyond the basic task of making the contents of the printed edition accessible, the OA platform makes the text interactive, with key features that allow readers to interact with the text by marking passages as interesting and adding terms to a crowdsourced index.

The OA platform marks a significant shift for Debates in the Digital Humanities in that it moves it from a single printed edition of collected essays to an expanded, ongoing digital publication stream that the Press plans to draw upon to publish both future editions of collection and other publications on more focused DH topics. While the first iteration of the digital platform contains only the content of the printed text, an expanded edition with new additions will appear in March 2013.

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Gabby G's curator insight, March 30, 2014 5:09 AM

 

@ernestprats Thank you for posting this!

 

To provide some context about this book, here is an excerpt  from the book's editor, Matthew K. Gold, via his blog http://blog.mkgold.net/

 

"A group of scholars – from both within and outside of the field – have assembled answers to some of those questions in a volume that I have recently edited for the University of Minnesota Press titled Debates in the Digital Humanities. In that book, contributors critique the digital humanities for a series of faults: not only paying inadequate attention to race, class, gender, and sexuality, but in some cases explicitly seeking to elide cultural issues from the frame of analysis; reinforcing the traditional academic valuation of research over teaching; and allowing the seductions of information visualization to paper over differences in material contexts."

 

This was part of a talk he gave at the 2012 MLA Panel "Debates in the Digital Humanities". See more here: http://blog.mkgold.net/2012/01/10/whose-revolution-toward-a-more-equitable-digital-humanities/ ;

Francisco Restivo's curator insight, March 31, 2014 9:45 AM

The digital vs. the analogue: Are we loosing something?

sandra alvaro's curator insight, March 31, 2014 11:24 AM

Encompassing new technologies, research methods, and opportunities for collaborative scholarship and open-source peer review, as well as innovative ways of sharing knowledge and teaching, the digital humanities promises to transform the liberal arts—and perhaps the university itself.

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Humanidades digitales y #BigData | #dh

Humanidades digitales y #BigData | #dh | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
Artículo de Juan Luis Suárez sobre la futura revolución de los grandes datos.

Via A Petapouca, Pierre Levy
luiy's insight:

Las humanidades digitales han comenzado a emitir señales acerca de su primera madurez. Éstas se pueden detectar en las agrupaciones de intereses y métodos que ya se distinguen por encima del ruido de los exploradores. Por un lado, parte de la práctica humanística se ha centrado en el uso y construcción de nuevos métodos de comunicación de la producción cultural y de la investigación humanística, desde blogs y tuits hasta sitios webs y libros electrónicos. Por otro lado, los más apegados a los textos han hecho del marcado de los mismos y de sus estándares –Text Encoding Initiative– uno de los campos más prolíficos de producción académica, aunque los avances en procesamiento de lenguaje natural y en machine learning comienzan a cuestionar si el esfuerzo ha valido la pena. En tercer lugar, hay quienes usando una variedad de tecnologías están valiéndose de todo el poder de la computación para, mezcladas con conceptos de sus disciplinas históricas, filológicas, o antropológicas, comprender mejor algunos de los problemas tradicionales de esas disciplinas.

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Catherine Pascal's curator insight, March 26, 2014 6:52 AM

Important . Merci !

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Petite Poucette | Michel Serres | #socialchange

Petite Poucette | Michel Serres | #socialchange | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

Le monde a tellement changé que les jeunes doivent tout réinventer ! 
Nos sociétés occidentales ont déjà vécu deux révolutions : le passage de l’oral à l’écrit, puis de l’écrit à l’imprimé. Comme chacune des précédentes, la troisième, tout aussi majeure, s’accompagne de mutations politiques, sociales et cognitives. Ce sont des périodes de crises.


De l’essor des nouvelles technologies, un nouvel humain est né : Michel Serres le baptise « Petite Poucette » – clin d’œil à la maestria avec laquelle les messages fusent de ses pouces.
Petite Poucette va devoir réinventer une manière de vivre ensemble, des institutions, une manière d’être et de connaître… Débute une nouvelle ère qui verra le triomphe de la multitude, anonyme, sur les élites dirigeantes, bien identifiées ; du savoir discuté sur les doctrines enseignées ; d’une société immatérielle librement connectée sur la société du spectacle à sens unique…
Faisons donc confiance à Petite Poucette pour mettre en œuvre cette utopie, seule réalité possible !

 

Professeur à Stanford University, membre de l’Académie française, Michel Serres est l’auteur de nombreux essais philosophiques et d’histoire des sciences, dont les derniers,Temps des crises et Musique ont été largement salués par la presse. Il est l’un des rares philosophes contemporains à proposer une vision du monde qui associe les sciences et la culture.

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Legendary Lands: Umberto Eco on the Greatest #Maps of #Imaginary Places | #dh

Legendary Lands: Umberto Eco on the Greatest #Maps of #Imaginary Places | #dh | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
"Often the object of a desire, when desire is transformed into hope, becomes more real than reality itself."

Celebrated Italian novelist,
luiy's insight:

 

The possible world of narrative is the only universe in which we can be absolutely certain about something, and it gives us a very strong sense of truth. The credulous believe that El Dorado and Lemuria exist or existed somewhere or other, and skeptics are convinced that they never existed, but we all know that it is undeniably certain that Superman is Clark Kent and that Dr. Watson was never Nero Wolfe’s right-hand man, while it is equally certain that Anna Karenina died under a train and that she never married Prince Charming.

 


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Visualizing Cultural Data | #dataviz #DH

Visualizing Cultural Data | #dataviz #DH | e-Xploration | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

Digital technologies affect academic research in many, different, ways. By transforming publishing models, collaborative activities or supporting the storage, the analysis and the dissemination of data and information, computers and Internet have deeply changed the way research is conceived, conducted and communicated.
These new relationships between the ‘digital’ and the ‘humanities’ are rapidly demanding for new, adequate instruments and methods for their observation and interpretation. Information visualizations and interfaces are proving to be essential tools to explore and make sense out of big and heterogeneous amounts of data.
This scenario provides a great opportunity for design – especially communication design – to actively participate in the current definition of new forms of scholarships, contributing at both theoretical and methodological levels and, at the same time, defining new collaborative models with emerging disciplines in the academies.

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Playing with Chance: On Random Generation in Playable Media and Electronic Literature | #DH

Playing with Chance: On Random Generation in Playable Media and Electronic Literature | #DH | e-Xploration | Scoop.it

Via Jose Afonso Furtado, Pierre Levy
luiy's insight:

Randomly generated content poses problems for theories of digital art: such content is resistant to structural theories, which can only provide templates, and one cannot assume a shared text for close analysis. Instead of reaching fixed endings, such works also tend to be of indefinite length or at least suggest indefinite possible combinations. I argue that the impact of such works can instead be found in how one attempts to work through their underlying grammar, based on limits in the algorithms that generate the content — not those limits themselves, but how their outlines come to be known. Repetitively iterating through these works simultaneously upholds the chance nature of the epiphenomenal occurrences while also illustrating the sameness of the underlying algorithm over time, creating a future-oriented interpretive arc. I examine two works that play off of this technique in different ways: Nick Montfort’s Taroko Gorge, a poetry generator which uses random generation to distill the essence of its object’s possibility, and the action role-playing game Torchlight, which attempts to elevate chance beyond a mere gameplay mechanic and toward an ethic.

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