e-Santé Marketing...
Follow
Find
12.4K views | +5 today
 
Rescooped by Dominique Godefroy from PATIENT EMPOWERMENT & E-PATIENT
onto e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant
Scoop.it!

Harnessing the Power of the Digital Patient


Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Dominique Godefroy's insight:

The biopharmaceutical industry is currently facing a number of macro-environmental factors, which underscore its need to
think of itself not as a developer of singular products, but as a critical part of an interoperable system. This fundamental shift
must include a strategic approach for engaging with an increasingly informed and connected patient population.

The amount of medical information now available to patients online is truly remarkable. Coupled with a decrease in the amount
of time physicians can actually spend with their patients, today’s health care consumers are savvy, engaged and have a strong
desire to learn as much as they can about their diseases.

By not directly engaging with patients, biopharmaceutical companies are missing an enormous opportunity to reduce the time
and cost of clinical development and maximize the return on their development investments. However, by earning patient trust
and creating a two-way dialog, some companies have been able to engage patients to participate and remain in research; prove
product value and safety by directly gathering personal outcomes, medical records, and diagnostic data from labs or devices;
and accelerate product adoption and adherence.

This white paper discusses how biopharmaceutical companies can harness the power of the digital patient when it engages
them in the appropriate manner. Quintiles’ Digital Patient Unit was founded to continue to innovate around these areas
of opportunity.

more...
No comment yet.
e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant
innovations en e & m-Santé
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Dominique Godefroy
Scoop.it!

Florida Hospital tests out shoe sensor for pediatric rehab

Florida Hospital tests out shoe sensor for pediatric rehab | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Florida Hospital, a 2,200-bed acute-care medical facility and a member of Adventist Health System, will begin testing a shoe-based wearable sensor from Seattle-based Reflx labs to assist in pediatric rehabilitation.

The platform, called Boogio Bionic Foot Sensors, consists of foot pressure, balance and 3D movement sensors hidden in a user’s shoe. They connect to a mobile app, allowing doctors or physical therapists to track a patient’s progress. Boogio will be deployed at Florida Hospital‘s “living laboratory campus,” called Celebration Health.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominique Godefroy
Scoop.it!

MD Anderson Pilots Apple Watch for Breast Cancer Treatment

MD Anderson Pilots Apple Watch for Breast Cancer Treatment | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
MD Anderson Cancer Center at Cooper is teaming up with behavioral health technology company Polaris Health Directions (Polaris) on an behavioral health pilot project using the Apple Watch to help improve breast cancer treatment outcomes. The integrated medical behavioral health pilot project will utilize the Apple Watch to capture behavioral data that could affect the courses and outcomes of treatment for breast cancer patients.

The partnership brings together MD Anderson Cooper’s expertise in oncology and Polaris’s deep experience in behavioral health science and innovative technology. It will leverage Polaris’s Polestar behavioral health outcomes management (BHOM) platform–an advanced data-collection-and-analytics platform that provides meaningful, actionable results for reporting on and monitoring of a patient’s expected treatment response.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominique Godefroy
Scoop.it!

Résultats du « Baromètre Santé 360″ Orange Healthcare / MNH

Résultats du « Baromètre Santé 360″ Orange Healthcare / MNH | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Les nouvelles technologies offrent de nombreuses possibilités pour optimiser les parcours de soins, en soutien de la relation médecin-patient traditionnelle.
Dans ce contexte, la seconde vague du baromètre Santé 360 d’Orange Healthcare et la MNH réalisé par ODOXA – avec le concours scientifique de la Chaire Santé de Sciences Po – interroge le grand public, les patients et les médecins sur leur perception du rôle de l’hôpital au sein des nouveaux parcours de soins.


L’Hôpital numérique n’est pas encore une réalité

Les résultats de la seconde édition du Baromètre Santé 360 montrent qu’aujourd’hui, les trois-quarts des patients prennent contact avec l’hôpital par téléphone (49%) ou sur place (26%) et seulement 5% d’entre eux choisissent Internet et les emails pour communiquer avec l’hôpital.

Le médecin traitant reste un acteur pivot de la relation patient-hôpital puisqu’il y organise les séjours dans 21% des cas.

La notion d’Hôpital numérique demeure lointaine car les médecins utilisent encore beaucoup le courrier et les dossiers papiers pour le partage d’informations médicales (56%), même s’ils seraient très demandeurs d’un usage accru des nouvelles technologies dans ce domaine.

Près de 90% des patients sont par ailleurs satisfaits de la gestion de leur relation avec les hôpitaux.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominique Godefroy
Scoop.it!

Prediction: 12 million wearable patches will ship in 2020

Prediction: 12 million wearable patches will ship in 2020 | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Research firm Tractica predicts that worldwide unit shipments of clinical and non-clinical connected wearable patches will grow to 12.3 million per year by 2020. Last year, annual shipments were just 67,000. The market for such connected patches, Tractica predicts, will hit $3.3 billion per year.

Tractica describes the category as including “patches, tattoos, or small devices that are affixed to the skin and worn for a limited period of time, ranging from an hour to several weeks” and adds that “the patches also have an element of wireless connectivity, and have a medical, health, or wellness purpose that can range from monitoring physiological data to delivering medication.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominique Godefroy
Scoop.it!

Pharma ‘ignoring patient services’

Pharma ‘ignoring patient services’ | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
The industry should be doing more to make patients aware of additional health services within their treatment pathways.

This is according a new survey: Patient Services: Pharma's Best Kept Secret, commissioned by Accenture, of 10,000 patients in five countries and across seven therapeutic areas.

It revealed that when patients are aware of additional therapeutic services, nearly six out of 10 of those surveyed use them (58%), and nearly eight in 10 (79%) perceive the services as extremely or very valuable.

Yet, less than one in five patients (19%) are aware these programmes even exist as pharma is not communicating their existence well enough.

Results show patient awareness is low across all therapeutic areas, ranging from 18% for bones, lung and heart conditions, to 21% for cancer and immune diseases.

The survey also revealed that patients want more help and guidance before they begin treatment for a disease, with their greatest frustration being lack of notification of being “at risk” for a condition.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dominique Godefroy from innovation & e-health
Scoop.it!

The Future May Be All About Tiny Wearables

The Future May Be All About Tiny Wearables | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Ils disent que les bonnes choses viennent en petits paquets. Et cela semble être doublement vrai pour les technologies portables.

 

Tout comme certains appareils sont de plus car la vidéo (la chose se passe) semble mieux plus, il ya une voie parallèle du développement numérique qui se passe pour le plus petit des petits.

Ou, comme Jeremy Wagstaff note dans un article récent publié par  Yahoo , "Oubliez« vestimentaires », et même« hearables ». La prochaine grande chose dans les appareils mobiles: '' disappearables ".

 

Comme si la nouvelle montre d'Apple était pas assez petit, les analystes de l'industrie croient vestimentaires pourraient bientôt être envahies par hearables - appareils avec des puces d'ordinateur minuscules qui correspondent à l'intérieur d'une oreille humaine. Pas assez petite? Que diriez-vous d'un disappearable qui borde la technologie dans votre pantalon ou veste?

«En cinq ans, quand nous regardons en arrière, tout ce que nous voyons (maintenant) sera absolument être classé comme des jouets, comme les premières étapes très simples d'obtenir ce droit», dit Nikolaj Hviid, l'homme derrière écouteurs intelligents appelé le Dash.


Via Alex Butler, Jerome Leleu
more...
Jerome Leleu's curator insight, May 18, 1:42 AM

ajouter votre perspicacité ...

Rescooped by Dominique Godefroy from PATIENT EMPOWERMENT & E-PATIENT
Scoop.it!

How #digitalhealth is changing doctor-patient relationships

How #digitalhealth is changing doctor-patient relationships | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

A few days ago, I was skimming my Twitter feed when I saw a post from a major academic medical center. The post, which showed off a group of the center’s specialists, featured five forty-something men and women, grouped in a “C” and dressed so casually that they looked like they were taking their dogs for a walk. (Sort of a “Friends” look, if you ignored the thinning hair and scattered wrinkles.)

Even five  years ago, you would never have seen a hospital present their specialists to the public in such an informal manner. No, the men would have been wearing dress shirts and ties, and the women business-like dresses and carefully conservative jewelry, capped, of course, by white lab coats. What’s more, they would have been posed with some sitting and some standing, all staring at the camera rather than paying any attention to each other, a display of powerful experts rather than people.

What a difference a few years of digital health evolution can make.

Today, with mHealth tools and social media putting patients into direct, sometimes intimate contact with their doctor or NP, providers are being nudged into the direction of exposing more of their actual selves rather than hiding behind that white coat.

While they still need to be careful what they say on medical topics, many providers are developing a more casual professional style, a development which is nearly inevitable as they spend increasing amounts of time in the same social sandboxes as patients.

Also, given the way apps, digital health tools like telemedicine and social media work, providers stand a chance of encountering their patients digitally 24 hours a day, rather than living in a completely separate world. This, too, lowers the barriers between doctors and patients, turning doctors into trusted advisers rather than stern scientists whose word is never to be challenged.

This trend is likely to expand in the future as patients are given some of  doctors’ minor superpowers, such as doing their own lab tests or conducting their own ultrasound with a smartphone-connected reader. True, patients have gradually been demanding more power in their medical relationships for quite some time, but with technology leveling the boundaries, the pace of change should accelerate.

Admittedly, both the patient and the doctor will probably go through some difficult moments as they shift dance steps. But if both sides are willing to keep dancing, change will come.

 


Via Plus91, Chanfimao, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominique Godefroy
Scoop.it!

Hospital Pilots Chemotherapy Apple Watch App in London

Hospital Pilots Chemotherapy Apple Watch App in London | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
King’s College Hospital in London is launching a pilot that will equip patients going through chemotherapy treatments with an Apple Watch to improve medication management and adherence, Wearable reports. Using Medopad’s Apple Watch Chemotherapy app, patients will receive on-wrist notifications of their medications to take. Patients will also be able to track their symptoms and temperature to submit to physicians in a couple of taps. Medical staff will also have access to patient’s activity levels captured by the Watch’s accelerometer through Medopad’s software solution.

So far, the British-based company Medopad who has been building apps for doctors since the inception of the iPad was able to acquire a couple of Apple Watches at the beginning of the trail. This was mainly due to the short supply in the market; however, Medopad’s CTO Dan Vàhdat noted that the company plans to purchase 100 or 200 Apple Watch devices.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominique Godefroy
Scoop.it!

« L’année 2015 sera cruciale pour l’évolution de l’écosystème des applications médicales »

« L’année 2015 sera cruciale pour l’évolution de l’écosystème des applications médicales » | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Richard Brady, chirurgien fondateur du site web Researchactive.com s’exprime sur l’écosystème des applications médicales aussi varié soit-il, et met en lumière les moyens qui permettraient de mieux engager les utilisateurs de ces applications mobiles. Il sera présent à l’occasion du congrès Health 2.0 qui se tiendra les 18 au 20 mai prochains à Barcelone et dont L’Atelier est partenaire.
L’Atelier : Quel est votre constat général à propos des applications mobiles médicales ?

Richard Brady : Aujourd’hui, on recense plus de 150 000 applications médicales disponibles sur le marché, mais de récentes études ont démontré que plus de 50 % d’entre elles ont été téléchargées moins de 500 fois. Les applications médicales sont répandues et disponibles, mais beaucoup moins utilisées qu’on voudrait le croire. De plus, il existe très clairement une batterie de mauvaises applications médicales : mal construites, dangereuses, inexactes, ou développées uniquement dans le but de faire du profit, sans aucun test préalable ou de connaissance précise sur le sujet qu’elles abordent. Ces applications prolifèrent mais peinent tout de même à s’imposer sur ce marché très compétitif.

2015 est une année rude mais aussi cruciale en ce qui concerne l’évolution de l’écosystème des applications médicales. Globalement, je pense qu’il persiste un manque d’information ainsi que de confiance de la part de grand public et des docteurs en ce qui concerne le potentiel réel des applications médicales. Ces insuffisances sont véhiculées par un défaut d’espaces fiables et réputés pour télécharger des applications médicales de bonne qualité, et par les classifications peu claires des app stores, qui ont tendance à mélanger les applications de catégorie « lifestyle et fitness » avec les applications médicales. De plus, l’absence d’un système d’étiquetage reconnaissable qui signalerait au consommateur que l’application est basée sur des preuves scientifiques ou a été examinée par des professionnels, ne participe pas à guider le consommateur.

De ce fait, on détecte de plus en plus du cynisme au sein des patients et des médecins à propos des applications médicales, qui a pris le pas sur l’enthousiasme général qui avait gagné ces mêmes populations sur les bénéfices d’une telle technologie.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dominique Godefroy from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Wearables 2015: Defining digital medicine

Wearables 2015: Defining digital medicine | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Digital medicine is poised to transform biomedical research, clinical practice and the commercial sector. Here we introduce a monthly column from R&D/venture creation firm PureTech tracking digital medicine's emergence.


Technology has already transformed the social fabric of life in the twenty-first century. It is now poised to profoundly influence disease management and healthcare. Beyond the hype of the 'mobile health' and 'wearable technology' movement, the ability to monitor our bodies and continuously gather data about human biology suggests new possibilities for both biomedical research and clinical practice. Just as the Human Genome Project ushered in the age of high-throughput genotyping, the ability to automate, continuously record, analyze and share standardized physiological and biological data augurs the beginning of a new era—that of high-throughput human phenotyping.


These advances are prompting new approaches to research and medicine, but they are also raising questions and posing challenges for existing healthcare delivery systems. How will these technologies alter biomedical research approaches, what types of experimental questions will researchers now be able to ask and what types of training will be needed? Will the ability to digitize individual characteristics and communicate by mobile technology empower patients and enable the modification of disease-promoting behaviors; at the same time, will it threaten patient privacy? Will doctors be prescribing US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared apps on a regular basis, not just to monitor and manage chronic disease but also to preempt acute disease episodes? Will the shift in the balance between disease treatment and early intervention have a broad economic impact on the healthcare system? How will the emergence of these new technologies reshape the healthcare industry and its underlying business models? What will be the defining characteristics of 'winning' products and companies?


These are just some of the questions we plan to ask over the coming months. In the meantime, we introduce here some of the key themes shaping R&D in the digital medicine field and focus on what they might mean for the biopharmaceutical and diagnostic/device industries.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Risto Suoknuuti's curator insight, May 17, 4:23 AM

Man made machines for mans use. Systems simplyfies after getting complex. This is the rule in the winning game.

Ed Crowley's curator insight, May 17, 8:30 AM

Wearable medical technology is quickly changing the potential for health research, and with IoT, health management. 

Be-Bound®'s curator insight, May 18, 9:54 AM

And this is just the beginning ! 

Scooped by Dominique Godefroy
Scoop.it!

Une appli "ludique" et un jeu pour évoquer la contraception d'urgence

Une appli "ludique" et un jeu pour évoquer la contraception d'urgence | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Le laboratoire HRA Pharma vient de lancer le jeu Capote Riposte et le Serious Game « Nuit Chaude Douche Froide » avec pour obejctif vise à sensibiliser, en particulier les jeunes, à la contraception d’urgence.

Le laboratoire HRA Pharma, pionnier dans la contraception d’urgence développée depuis 1999, a développé deux nouveaux outils sur un mode ludique puisqu’ils utilisent le jeu interactif pour informer et sensibiliser le grand public à la contraception d’urgence.

L’appli Capote Riposte, disponible sur Android et IOS se présente sous la forme d’un jeu dont le principe est de prendre le contrôle de son personnage et piéger les spermatozoides pour les empêcher de s’échapper. Plusieurs niveaux de difficultés et des questions sur la contraception complètent l’ensemble. En cas d’accident, des questions bonus permettent aux joueurs d’obtenir une pilule du lendemain pour continuer la partie.

HRA Pharma avait déjà développé au printemps 2015 un serious game sur la contraception d’urgence intitulé « Nuit Chaude Douche Froide » pour informer de manière originale sur les risques encourus lors d’un échec contraceptif.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominique Godefroy
Scoop.it!

E-santé : Imedicup, une coupelle à médicaments connectée pour les personnes âgées et malvoyantes

E-santé : Imedicup, une coupelle à médicaments connectée pour les personnes âgées et malvoyantes | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

Imedicup est une coupelle à médicaments connectée destinée aux personnes âgées ou aux personnes malvoyantes. Conçue par la société française Medissimo, ce système permet de sécuriser la prise de médicaments, limitant les risques d’oubli ou de confusion.
A l’instar du pilulier connecté Imedipac, Imedicup est une solution qui permet de prolonger l’autonomie à domicile des personnes âgées.


Imedicup : présentation d’une solution connectée pour sécuriser la prise de médicaments

Imedicup est une coupelle à médicaments connectée à utiliser en association avec le pilulier medipac. Cette coupelle permet d’une part d’intégrer des ordonnances électroniques et d’autre part de scanner les médicaments intégrés au pilulier avant leur prise.

Concrètement, le pharmacien prépare le pilulier medipac en saisissant les données relatives au traitement du patient. Grâce à une application mobile Medissimo, la coupelle Imedicup récupère et enregistre les données de traitement du pilulier.
Lorsque vient le moment de prendre ses médicaments, le patient est alerté par l’Imedicup, qui émet un signal sonore, et par l’application elle-même, sur son smartphone ou sa tablette.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dominique Godefroy from Digital Health
Scoop.it!

New video game imitates symptoms of Alzheimer's

New video game imitates symptoms of Alzheimer's | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

The heavy chime of a clock wakes you in a vaguely familiar living room. Scattered keepsakes on tables drop hints at the people who have passed through here, but you can't quite piece them together. The photos hanging on the walls capture smiling faces you don't wholly recognize, even if one of them is yours.


This is the opening scene of Forget-Me-Knot, a new video game that puts its players in the shoes of someone battling Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Alexander Tarvet, a student in Abertay University's Game Design & Production Management program in Dundee, Scotland, aims to use the game to raise awareness of the brain disease, in which a person's memory, thinking and problem-solving skills progressively worsen over time


Via Alex Butler
more...
Tanja Juslin's curator insight, May 13, 12:53 AM

You tended to remember...

Scooped by Dominique Godefroy
Scoop.it!

#eSanté : Un marché estimé à 2,4 milliards d’euros et qui devrait progresser de 7% par an

#eSanté : Un marché estimé à 2,4 milliards d’euros et qui devrait progresser de 7% par an | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
À l’occasion du congrès Doctors 2.0 & You qui aura lieu à la Cité Universitaire à Paris, les 4 et 5 juin prochain, Denise Silber, fondatrice de cet événement, fait un point sur le secteur de la santé et du digital. Son métier ? Accompagner les acteurs de l’industrie de la santé dans leur transformation numérique depuis 1995.
Quelles sont les grandes lignes de l’évolution de l’e-santé depuis ses premiers balbutiements ?

Les premiers logiciels destinés à la santé datent des années 60. Ils ont été créés par des professionnels de santé dans leurs hôpitaux et laboratoires. On parlait déjà du dossier médical électronique. Mais malheureusement, près de 50 ans après il n’est toujours pas disponible de manière universelle. Il y a eu ensuite l’émergence de la télémédecine utilisée de façon ponctuelle. Elle est née du besoin de rapprocher un patient d’un médecin, sur les champs de bataille, dans l’espace, dans les prisons, dans des régions inaccessibles. Puis, avec l’amélioration de la prise en charge des maladies chroniques est arrivé le télémonitoring, le suivi régulier de certains patients chroniques, par exemple de suivre la consommation en oxygène du malade en insuffisance respiratoire.

L’internet a apporté une vraie rupture au milieu des années 1990 avec la démocratisation de l’accès à l’information santé avec le terme e-santé qui date de 1997. La profession médicale en France a mis un certain temps avant d’accepter que les patients puissent se servir d’internet. Près de 20 ans en fait. Entre temps, de nombreux usages se sont développés ailleurs, tels que des communautés en ligne, des applications mobiles et des serious games pour améliorer la compréhension des maladies. Cela fait déjà quelques années que l’objet connecté est utilisé pour mesurer de façon régulière notre activité. Ce qui nous conduit à parler de la santé connectée.
Quelles sont les tendances aujourd’hui en matière d’innovation ?

Nous sommes aujourd’hui témoins de ruptures plus importantes que toutes celles que nous avons vécues jusqu’à présent. Par exemple, le Do It Yourself. Il est possible aujourd’hui, grâce à une société californienne qui l’a inventé, avec quelques gouttes de sang, de réaliser trente tests de laboratoire de biologie chez soi. Des imprimantes 3D permettent de fabriquer chez soi des prothèses. A un stade un peu plus lointain de quelques années, il y aura des organes « on a chip ». Des scientifiques travaillent sur des puces destinées à remplacer des organes. C’est est encore à un stade expérimental mais cela progresse. Il y a aussi l’exosquellete motorisé qui permet aux handicapés de remarcher ; nous savons communiquer de cerveau à cerveau, par la stimulation magnétique craniale, chose pratiquée à MIT. L’ordinateur IBM Watson qui combat le cancer à partir de l’analyse du génome de chaque patient….
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominique Godefroy
Scoop.it!

Les Français réticents à partager leurs données de santé avec les labos pharmaceutiques

Les Français réticents à partager leurs données de santé avec les labos pharmaceutiques | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Les Français sont réticents à partager leurs données de santé dès lors que cet échange d’information s’effectuerait avec des acteurs économiques comme les laboratoires pharmaceutiques. Ils ne sont que 32% à accepter ce partage. C’est ce qui ressort de l’étude menée en avril dernier par le cabinet d’études Odoxa à la demande d’Orange.

Personne de confiance

En revanche, les Français et les patients se disent prêts à partager ces informations avec l’équipe de soin qui les prend en charge (86%), avec un autre professionnel de santé (79%), ou avec une personne de confiance à condition qu’ils l’aient eux-mêmes nommée (74%).

Enfin, 63% des Français et 84% des médecins souhaiteraient pouvoir récupérer l’ensemble de leurs données de santé réparties dans les systèmes d’informations hospitaliers et auprès des professionnels de santé grâce à un simple bouton sur leur téléphone mobile.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominique Godefroy
Scoop.it!

From cancer to feet: the power of Twitter in healthcare

From cancer to feet: the power of Twitter in healthcare | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
twitter healthcareWhy should Twitter care about healthcare, other than the obvious reason that it’s a $3 trillion industry just in the U.S.?

Because consumers care about the kind of influence, support and resources that social media can uncover, according to Craig Hashi, one of two Twitter engineers dedicated to healthcare.

Speaking Sunday at the Cleveland Clinic’s sixth annual Patient Experience: Empathy + Innovation Summit, Hashi cited some interesting statistics from a variety of sources. Some 40 percent of consumers believe that information they found on social media affects how they deal with their health, he said. A quarter of Internet users with chronic illnesses look for people with similar health issues. And 42 percent search online for reviews of health products, treatments and providers.

The volume of information available on Twitter is staggering, Hashi said. There are half a billion tweets send every day. There will be more words on Twitter in the next two years than in all books ever printed. An analysis Hashi put together found that there were 44 million cancer-related tweets in the 12 months ending in March 2015, and traffic spiked in October, which happens to be Breast Cancer Awareness Month.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominique Godefroy
Scoop.it!

Des chaussettes connectées pour prévenir les complications liées au diabète

Des chaussettes connectées pour prévenir les complications liées au diabète | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Des chercheurs de l’institut allemand Fraunhofer ISC ont mis au point des chaussettes connectées pour prévenir certaines complications liées au diabète. Bardées de capteurs, elles détectent les zones de pression excessive susceptibles d’entraîner des lésions et avertissent l’utilisateur via une application mobile qu’il est temps de changer de position.

Des complications graves qui pourraient être évitées

Les hyperglycémies répétées peuvent provoquer chez le patient diabétique une altération des nerfs et des vaisseaux sanguins. Il en résulte une diminution de la sensibilité au niveau des pieds et un retard dans la cicatrisation des plaies. Un patient peut donc voir une petite blessure provoquer des complications graves, pouvant aller jusqu’à l’amputation. 10% des diabétiques seraient concernés, et près de 10 000 amputations seraient imputables au diabète chaque année en France.

Un grand nombre d’entre elles pourraient cependant être évitées grâce à des mesures de prévention et un diagnostic précoce permettant de traiter le patient à temps. Cette prévention passe d’abord par une surveillance des pieds (contrôles visuels réguliers, hygiène rigoureuse, chaussures adaptées et soins appropriés à la moindre blessure). Mais le développement des capteurs et textiles connectés pourraient apporter de nouvelles solutions pour aider les patients.

Des chaussettes connectées au service de la prévention

Des chercheurs allemands de la Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft, un réseau d’instituts allemands spécialisés dans la recherche en sciences appliquées, ont mis au point des chaussettes connectées pour prévenir certaines complications liées au diabète avant qu’elles n’apparaissent. Les capteurs dont elles sont équipées permettraient en effet de détecter les zones de pression excessive à l’origine de lésions.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominique Godefroy
Scoop.it!

Apple Watch for diabetics

Apple Watch for diabetics | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Watch this!

Looking for something useful to do with your Apple Watch? Dexcom, the maker of a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) for diabetics, suggests you use the watch to monitor CGM –your own or someone else’s. This functionality has been available as a smartphone app, but the watch version is designed to be more convenient and discreet.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominique Godefroy
Scoop.it!

e-santé : quand le médicament français se connecte

e-santé : quand le médicament français se connecte | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
La société Medissimo, PME innovante de la santé qui se spécialise dans le conditionnement des médicaments en pilulier individuel, a réalisé une étude en mars 2015 sur les habitudes de consommation de médicaments réalisée auprès d’une population de plus de 35 000 personnes âgées pendant 3 ans.

Medissimo souhaite, à travers ses actions et notamment la publication de cette étude, faire de la santé connectée un « véritable outil de santé publique ». Ainsi, les données anonymisées de l’étude rendues publiques sont mises à la disposition des universités d’Europe.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominique Godefroy
Scoop.it!

Infographic: 3 Steps to Engage Patients in Advance Care Planning

Infographic: 3 Steps to Engage Patients in Advance Care Planning | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Advance care planning is extremely personal and very complex, leaving many patients to either opt out of making decisions at all or too uncomfortable to discuss them with their provider, according to Emmi Solutions.

A new by Emmi Solutions provides strategies for providers to engage patients in advance care planning.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominique Godefroy
Scoop.it!

The BioDigital Human: Exploring Health in 3D

The BioDigital Human: Exploring Health in 3D | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
It has been hailed as the equivalent of Google Maps for the human body by The New York Times, and now the award-winning mobile-friendly platform BioDigital Human is looking to change the way healthcare information is shared, consumed and understood.

The platform has rolled out a mobile-friendly version that is now available for iPad, iPhone and Android. (Check out below for a peak at an animated view of the brain.)

CEO and co-founder Frank Sculli, sat down with Bioscience Technology to walk us through the platform, which just won silver in the research and education category at the 2015 Thomas Edison awards, and to discuss exciting possibilities for the biomedical community.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominique Godefroy
Scoop.it!

London hospital pilots Apple Watch for chemo patients

London hospital pilots Apple Watch for chemo patients | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
A London hospital is the latest to put the Apple Watch to use within its walls, this time to improve medication management and adherence for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. According to a report from Wareable, King’s College Hospital will be the first to pilot an app from Medopad, a British company that also makes tablet-based mobile health technology.

“Cancer treatment is a challenging journey,” Dr Siamak Arami, a Consultant Haematologist at King’s College Hospital, told The Journal of mHealth last month, when Medopad launched the app. “Adherence to complicated treatment regimens, and the streamlined recording and reporting of health issues during treatment are of paramount value. Medopad’s Apple Watch chemotherapy application is an exciting new development in medical technology that can transform the quality and safety of care for patients, carers and care providers. This can eventually reduce the cost and improve the outcome of treatment for cancer patients.”
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dominique Godefroy from Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English)
Scoop.it!

Apple Watch Changes the Health Wearables Game

Apple Watch Changes the Health Wearables Game | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it

After months of speculation and hype, the Apple Watch has finally arrived. 

What are some first impressions? How does it compare with other watches, bands and wearables? How will it impact the digital health landscape? (By the way, if you are reading this review for information on how to deliver your one-way banner ads brand messages via Apple Watch, you're already missing the point.)

I have been an avid user of wearable fitness and health trackers for a few years. After losing several Nike FuelBands on the soccer field, I recently switched to the Microsoft Band. Although it's slightly bulky, I truly enjoy the simple interface for tracking my activities, instantly measuring my heart rate and even paying for my Starbucks coffee.

Then along comes the Apple Watch. Of course it's got a great design, but it's not going to be for everyone initially. The learning curve is steep, especially if you're like me and don't take advantage of the online or in-store training. It does have a limited battery life and seems to be missing some core health functions. It might not be ideal for people with poor vision, and it doesn't currently have independent GPS capability. I was particularly worried about whether I could wear it while playing soccer, but I simply placed a wristband over it. Voila! I didn't find a default sleep-measurement function, but I assume that there will be apps to do that. Maybe Apple would rather I charge my watch while I sleep.

It's been only a few days, but I can already say that the Apple Watch experience is a great improvement over my other fitness bands. In addition to tracking my heart rate and how much I'm moving or sitting, the Apple Watch lets me do everyday things like receive texts and email, take phone calls and use Apple Pay. But I'm most excited about how it and other wearables will help me modify my behavior for better health. There's something very motivating about receiving visual and sensory cues from a device attached to your body. For instance, the Apple Watch gives you a nudge every hour to get up and move for a minute. It's very subtle and it may be a minuscule benefit, but it can be a great tool to combat the 21st century “disease of sitting” that so many of us are facing. 

We have been talking about big data, value beyond the pill and behavioral economics for some time. 

These wearable devices provide a great opportunity to do more than simply be shiny objects for early adopters. Wearables aren't just for fitness—they can make a big impact on adherence, compliance and cessation of unhealthy behaviors. 

Two hospital systems are currently conducting digital medicine trials using the Apple Watch to help manage hypertension and to determine how nurses and physicians can benefit from incorporating the Apple Watch into a medical home program. There are already a number of industry-related apps available for Apple Watch, including those from Drchrono, Lark, Doximity, WebMD, HealthTap and others.

The uptake has been rapid: Consider the fact more Apple Watches were sold in one day than Android Wear devices in an entire year. As a digital marketer, don't expect every demographic to immediately adopt the Apple Watch or other wearables. But ignore the Apple Watch effect at your own risk. The impact of this new technology and interface will manifest over time, just like our mobile phones did. 

Remember when they said social media was only a fad?



Via Plus91, Celine Sportisse
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominique Godefroy
Scoop.it!

Santé publique : lorsque des applis aident à lutter contre le cancer

Santé publique : lorsque des applis aident à lutter contre le cancer | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
La santé connectée – et plus principalement les applications mobiles – est un réel enjeu de santé publique, notamment en prévention et éducation à la santé. 52% des français déclarent d’ailleurs utiliser, ou avoir utilisé, au moins un outil numérique dans le cadre de la prévention des risques pour leur santé[1]. Zoom sur trois applications qui œuvrent pour la prévention et le dépistage des cancers…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dominique Godefroy
Scoop.it!

Innovation: une gélule connectée contre l’obésité

Innovation: une gélule connectée contre l’obésité | e-Santé Marketing Santé innovant | Scoop.it
Des chercheurs ont mis au point une gélule appelée MelCap System. Ils ont somme toute amélioré le système déjà connu des éponges qui se distendent dans l’estomac afin de provoquer une satiété chez le patient obèse. Dans ce cas-ci, selon la vidéo disponible sur YouTube, la capsule s’ouvre et laisse se diffuser dans une partie de l’estomac seulement une poche occupant un certain volume. La capsule est magnétique, ce qui permet de la positionner correctement grâce à un aimant externe. La capsule peut être activée via un smartphone par exemple.

En plus de libérer un volume de contenu réduisant le volume de l’estomac, l’activation de la capsule, expliquent les concepteurs, stimule électriquement la paroi de l’estomac : les muscles et les terminaisons nerveuses. Cette stimulation permet d’envoyer un signal de satiété une fois l’estomac rempli. L’objectif est d’apprendre au patient de contrôler ses ingesta.
more...
No comment yet.