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Kirkpatrick's Four-Level Evaluation Model in Instructional Design

Kirkpatrick's Four-Level Evaluation Model in Instructional Design | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
RT @MitchWeiss1978: Kirkpatrick's Four Level Evaluation Model - The Basics! - #eLearning #instructionaldesign | http://t.co/ci0Z3Gds2H

Via robinwb
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Still the benchmark in evaluation of learning ...

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Integrating the 16 Habits of Mind

Integrating the 16 Habits of Mind | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
Edutopia blogger Terry Heick provides a quick tour of Costa and Kallick's 16 Habits of Mind, along with suggestions for integrating them as classroom best practices.
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12+ Books for Instructional Designers

12+ Books for Instructional Designers | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
If you're looking for some reading to improve your skills or get started in the field of instructional design, check out these books.
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Learning Theory v5 - What are the established learning theories?

Learning Theory v5 - What are the established learning theories? | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
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Connecting the dots

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Storytelling In eLearning - YouTube

Storytelling In eLearning - YouTube | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
Storytelling in elearning can make it more effective, but understanding how to do that effectively can be extremely challenging. This 10 Part Series explores...
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A virtual treasure of information about one the best engagement tools for elearning

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Three Ways to Shift Instructional Practices to Meet the Needs of 21st-Century Learners

Three Ways to Shift Instructional Practices to Meet the Needs of 21st-Century Learners | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
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Why Workplace Learning Fails, And Why It's Time to Ban The Fire Hose

Why Workplace Learning Fails, And Why It's Time to Ban The Fire Hose | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
Could it be that employees really want workplace training, but they don’t want to learn the way companies teach them?
Lawrence Jacobson's insight:

Trying to pack as much learning into a single event, maybe because time "is" money, is more and more being seen as a less-effective approach than spreading out learning over time. Teacher-facilitator-coach-peer, is this a natural progression and improvement?

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A Periodic Table To Help You Choose The Best Type Of Visualization - Edudemic

A Periodic Table To Help You Choose The Best Type Of Visualization - Edudemic | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
People love visuals. Visuals have been shown to help us learn more quickly and to retain more information than text alone. We’re more easily able to understand the world around us when we have visual components to aid us. The same goes for the classroom. If you present your students with a block of text …
Lawrence Jacobson's insight:

Although text-based by own preference, more and more I am seeing the benefits of a more visual style for elearning

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10 Surprising Social Media Facts [INFOGRAPHIC] - Mainstreethost Blog

10 Surprising Social Media Facts [INFOGRAPHIC] - Mainstreethost Blog | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
Here's an infographic that lists ten essential facts you should keep in mind when using social media to market your business.
Lawrence Jacobson's insight:

From deep within disruptive technologies emerges predictibility and pattern. Very interesting?

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46 Hidden Tips and Tricks to Use Google Search Like a Boss

46 Hidden Tips and Tricks to Use Google Search Like a Boss | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
How often do you use Google to find something on the internet? If like a lot of people you use Google every day you’ll be astounded by the number of hidden tips and tricks their search facility off...
Lawrence Jacobson's insight:

How do I google you, let me count the ways

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10 TED Talks Perfect For the eLearning Industry - eLearning Industry

10 TED Talks Perfect For the eLearning Industry - eLearning Industry | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
Does eLearning kill creativity? Bring on the eLearning revolution! What do you believe about open-source learning? What eLearning developers can learn from kids? Would you teach at the 100,000 student classroom? What have you learned from online education?
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Rescooped by Lawrence Jacobson from Online Video Publishing
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The Top 100 Tools to Capture, Edit, Publish and Distribute Video Online

The Top 100 Tools to Capture, Edit, Publish and Distribute Video Online | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
The best tools and services to capture, edit, publish and distribute video online.

Via Robin Good
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Mª Jesús García S.M.'s curator insight, January 13, 1:58 AM

Awfully good list!

Tdutec Innovación Educativa's curator insight, January 25, 11:51 AM

añada su visión ...

Ness Crouch's curator insight, April 9, 8:31 PM

Wow! Extensive Lots of ideas here!!

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7 Trends Shaping How Brands Use Social Media in 2014 [INFOGRAPHIC]

7 Trends Shaping How Brands Use Social Media in 2014 [INFOGRAPHIC] | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it

2013 was a year of exploration for brands on social media. From testing Vines to launching Instagram ads, many companies were dabbling in social media efforts across the Web just to see how customers would react.

Now, in 2014, brands are geting serious. They’re using the wealth of data as well as the human connection that social media can provide to develop deeper relationships with customers.

 

Visit the link for more on these seven ways brands are using social media to increase customer loyalty this year.


Via Lauren Moss
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Eyal Levi's curator insight, May 8, 2014 2:41 AM

Here some of the benesits considering social media

Katie Muirhead's curator insight, August 19, 2014 11:52 AM

Further highlights statistics of social media consumption and the information behind the choices of online advertisiers

David W. Deeds's curator insight, October 7, 2014 4:21 PM

Thanks to Lauren Moss.

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The 892 unique ways to partition a 3 x 4 grid

The 892 unique ways to partition a 3 x 4 grid | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
Lawrence Jacobson's insight:

It took me a while to figure this one out and then realised how helpful this could be with designing e-learning interfaces and templates. 

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The 5 Pillars of Interaction Design

The 5 Pillars of Interaction Design | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
The 5 pillars of interaction design




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JERRY CAO
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Jerry Cao is a content strategist at UXPin — the wireframing and prototyping app — where he develops in-app and online content for the wireframing and prototyping platform.

In today’s world of infinite-scrolling websites and touch devices, you must understand interaction design in order to create user experiences that feel fluid and life-like.

As described in Interaction Design Best Practices Vol. 1, interaction design requires mastery of multiple UX disciplines — which makes sense, since it’s not easy to make a system of objects feel friendly, learnable, and useful.

Let’s start by defining IxD, breaking down the core principles, and explaining a 5-step process to better interaction design.

The 5 Pillars of Interaction Design

Good interaction design is driven by a human connection. But what drives human connection and how does that translate into a computerized interface? The answers to these questions aren’t so black-and-white. In our experience, we’ve found that success depends on the perfect execution of UX fundamentals.

1. Goal-driven Design

Even if you’re not personally conducting user research, you still need to know how to build the insights into the design.



 Source: MailChimp Personas

We’ve found these UX processes help you empathize with users as people made of flesh and blood:

1. Personas — Personas are fictional characters created from the behaviors and psychologies of your target users. Personas come in handy as a reference when making crucial design decisions, for example, “What kind of checkout process would Sally the Seasonal Shopper prefer?”

2. User Scenarios — Related to personas, user scenarios explain how the personas act when using the site. For example, “It’s Black Friday, and Sally the Seasonal Shopper has a long list of presents to buy online before work.” User scenarios force you to explore the context in which the persona interacts with your product.



Source: Detailed Experience Map

3. Experience Maps — Going one step further from user scenarios, experience maps chronicle all the conditions surrounding a single interaction, including emotion and external circumstances. “Angry that her skiing trip ended in a broken leg, Sally the Seasonal Shopper must do her Christmas shopping as quickly as possible.”

These three techniques create a complete picture of the experience: the user, the scenario, and the entire emotional journey.

2. Usability

Usability is the bare minimum for design. If your audience can’t use the product, they certainly won’t desire it. Let’s look at EventBrite’s seat designer.

This online app lets event organizers create a reserved-seating event from start to finish with a high level of detail (such as determining rows, tables, and a dance floor, if needed). It consolidates a multi-step, multi-program process into a single linear path.



Source: EventBrite Seating Designer

Like Eventbrite, a system’s usability must be effortless. The less attention the user pays to figuring out the system, the more they can accomplish the task at hand.

3. Affordances & Signifiers

The concept of affordances is that a function must speak for itself, and suggest its own use (i.e. a road affords walking). Signifiers hint at the affordance (i.e. the road’s flat surface signals you to walk with your feet).

Affordances in Design

Without signifiers, users can’t perceive the affordance.



Source: Affordances in Design

In the above example, you can see the progression of button design. The first stage lacks any signifiers and looks just like standard text, while the third stage resembles a button with its rounded edges and gradient.



Source: Affordances in Design

Signifiers also work as metaphors, because people also need to know why they would interact with something, not just if it’s possible. In the above iPhone dock example, you can see how the rounded edges let us know that we can interact with the buttons, while the metaphorical images (phones, envelope, musical note) communicate the purpose.

4. Learnability

In an ideal world, a user remembers every function after a single use. Reality is much different. Familiarity and intuition must be designed into every interface.

Successful interaction design boils down complexity by creating consistency and predictability. For example, don’t make some links open in a new tab while others redirect the user. Likewise, don’t use a lightbox for some images while others open in a new tab.

Consistency creates predictability, which improves learnability.



Source: Consistency As the Key to Better UX

A common tactic for improving learnability is using UI patterns. Many sites and apps already use these patterns so the user is familiar (plus the pattern is consistent), and you’re still allowed plenty of creativity to customize the design elements for your site.



Source: Breadcrumb Navigation in Website Design: Outdated or Trending?

For example, breadcrumbs are a common web pattern for helping users navigate. It doesn’t matter what site you’re on, if you see breadcrumbs, you understand how they work. This familiarity lends itself to a product’s learnability. When products are learnable, it encourages people to use those products, which naturally improves usability.

5. Feedback & Response Time

Feedback is the heart of interaction. Since every interaction is a conversation between your user and product, your product better be friendly, interesting, and helpful.



Source: Applied Interaction Design

Whether an elaborate animation, a beautiful micro-interaction, or a simple beep, your product must communicate if the task was or was not accomplished (and what to do next).

In the below example from Hootsuite, the owl simply “goes to sleep” after a long period of user inactivity, which makes sense since the app pulls in data from Twitter (and doesn’t want to overload the API). The feedback is intelligent and fun, and actually turns a possibly negative experience (stopping updates) into a positive one.



Source: Emotionally Intelligent Interaction Design

Another key factor in feedback is response time. The best response times are as immediate as possible. Imagine how infuriating it would be if you were playing a guitar, and every note came seconds after strumming.

5-Step Process for Improving Interactions

Now that you know the fundamentals, we’ll describe a process we’ve found helpful to nailing the details.



Source: IXDA Columbus

As notable interaction designer Stephen P. Anderson advises, it can be eye-opening to have someone pretend to be your interface while you interact with them as a user. You’ll be able to hear out loud any awkward responses from the interface, which will help you avoid creating robotic interactions that feel inhumane. Once you’re done with the role play, you can start scripting the narrative and restructuring interaction.

Here’s the process:

Roleplay the interaction — Grab two people, one to act as the interface and the other to take notes. Make a browser window prop to be held by the interface person and show the interface on a projector. Then, start a dialog with you as the user explaining their goal, and the “interface” limiting their responses only to labels, menus, and anything else on the UI. Check out this video and transcript to see how it plays out.



Source: Interaction Design Roleplay & Micromoments

Map out the narrative — Document each step of the experience, including tasks and emotions. As discussed in The Guide to UX Design Documentation, this can be as simple as a few user scenarios or as complex as a 4-stage experience map.



Source: Anatomy of an Experience Map

Simplify the steps — Users sometimes have goals that require many steps (buying a car online, booking airline tickets). As recommended in The Guide to Prototyping, your interface must be able to separate a complex goal into simple steps (like asking for a destination, then a departure/arrival date, etc). For example, Virgin America’s stepped form design make the booking process feel much easier than it is.

 

Source: Web UI Patterns 2014

Limit user choices — This is probably the hardest step, but you must minimize the actions available to users. Always ask yourself if all the choices are critical for that moment in time. If not, separate it for another conversation.

Pay attention to micromoments — A micromoment is when a person might hesitate, advance, or stop when engaging with interfaces. If you look back to the role-playing exercise, you’ll remember the moments of apprehension. To clarify the conversation, take advantage of microcopy and UI patterns like contextual actions and selection-dependent inputs (which we discuss in Web UI Patterns 2014).

Just like a magician’s trick will fail if the details are off, just one bad interaction can ruin the entire user experience. The process we described above will help you approach interaction design as a conversation rather than just a way of animating interfaces.

If you’d like more inspiration and examples of good interaction design, this Quora thread includes great sources ranging from films to websites like Core77 and PatternTap.

Closing

Interaction design isn’t about how interfaces behave, it’s about adapting technology based on how people behave. You must know your target users like and expect, functionally and emotionally. Based on the technological constraints, you must then design the product for desirability.

The best interaction design is barely there: your product responds promptly, doesn’t require much thought, and works like a good magic trick.

Read Next: How to optimize blog design to better engage with readers


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The Complete Guide to #SocialMedia Image Sizes 2015 - #infographic

The Complete Guide to #SocialMedia Image Sizes 2015 - #infographic | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
Get your social media platforms optimized with the right image sizes and stand out from the crowd.
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The Most Basic Things eLearning Professionals Need to Know About Learning

The Most Basic Things eLearning Professionals Need to Know About Learning | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
Understanding how the brain processes and stores information is key for eLearning professionals as they plan for instruction.
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The building blocks of the learning process. Not all of these must occur in a course, but all need to be accounted for.

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Diving Into Project-Based Learning? Heed these 7 Warnings

Diving Into Project-Based Learning? Heed these 7 Warnings | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
By John Hardison - BEWARE. Creativity can be dangerous. Especially when you are diving into project-based learning.
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Single-Concept Learning: A Radical Alternative To Traditional Workplace Training

Single-Concept Learning: A Radical Alternative To Traditional Workplace Training | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
How can organizations make training and development easier for managers to do? A new approach to technology-enabled learning may hold the answer.
Lawrence Jacobson's insight:

Single-concept learning or using a thin-slice approach breaks learning events down into smaller 5 to 15 minutes occurrences, as and when required. Just in time, personalised and responsive to learner needs. Certainly, at least, a combination of this with established training methods offers a better impact than classroom training on its own.

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A Simple Trick for Learning New Information

A Simple Trick for Learning New Information | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
Students in an experiment appeared to do a better job learning when they thought they'd have to teach the material in question later on.
Lawrence Jacobson's insight:

Certainly not unequivocal findings, but I can certainly vouch for the effectiveness of peer-assisted learning and peer-directed learning in deepening the experience and enjoyment for learners. The old paradigm of master-novice, while still effective in many situations, is making space for a more democratic learning environment populated by equals in both experience and responsibility for learning to occur.

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Looking Ahead: The Future of the Internet at WhoIsHostingThis.com

Looking Ahead: The Future of the Internet at WhoIsHostingThis.com | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
What will the internet look like in the near future, 20 years, 100 years? We explore the possibilities in this illustration.
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How To Format The Perfect Social Media Ads: A 2014 Cheat Sheet (Infographic)

How To Format The Perfect Social Media Ads: A 2014 Cheat Sheet (Infographic) | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
The number of social networks that offer advertising grows every day and it can get confusing formatting ads for each specific community. The bottom line: Looks are everything.  In order to get the …
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Move from success with informal networking in social media to am formal, targeted approach.

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A List of Interesting Mobile Learning Links | The Upside Learning Blog

A List of Interesting Mobile Learning Links | The Upside Learning Blog | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
Interesting Mobile Learning links with referances to mlearning, performance support, ‘just-in-time, BYOD etc.
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Yes We Can? Can Tin Can API Change E-Learning? | Aurion Learning

Yes We Can? Can Tin Can API Change E-Learning? | Aurion Learning | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it
Lawrence Jacobson's insight:

E-learning needs to move away from strict adherence to SCORM alone and towards a system that allows tracking of whether real learning and behaviour change is occurring. Simply tracking learner progress and assessment scores is definitely not enough. A question must be asked whether the computer alone is capable of measuring learning impact? A blended approach is necessary.

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ARCS Explained

ARCS Explained | E-learning with the Ltrain | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Learner motivation

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Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, April 21, 2014 7:03 PM

mais uma opcao para o desenvolvimento de projetos educacionais, corporativos ou não. Curto a simplicidade, me preocupando menos se é teoria ou um modelo.