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Shifting the Debate on Tech

Shifting the Debate on Tech | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
One day, the debate of whether to  tech or not to tech will no longer make sense, no longer be discussed, no longer belong to a narrow community, who at times, sound revolutionary to the non-pract...

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[pictures] The Maker Movement. Implications of new digital gadgets, fabrication tools and spaces for creative learning and teaching

[pictures] The Maker Movement. Implications of new digital gadgets, fabrication tools and spaces for creative learning and teaching | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
In our article “The Maker Movement. Implications of new digital gadgets, fabrication tools and spaces for creative learning and teaching” the figures are available in bad quality – here are the originals, under CC BY: Reference: Schön, Sandra;...
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HERRAMIENTAS DE EVALUACIÓN MINEDUC

HERRAMIENTAS DE EVALUACION DE DESEMPEÑO Y OBSERVACION

Via ANIBAL CADENA, Juergen Wagner
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Bringing Storytelling into eLearning Infographic - e-Learning Infographics

Bringing Storytelling into eLearning Infographic - e-Learning Infographics | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
The Bringing Storytelling into eLearning Infographic presents the fundamentals of storytelling in eLearning.
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Utilizing the power of Storytelling to create engaging Simulations: A 4 Prong Strategy

Utilizing the power of Storytelling to create engaging Simulations: A 4 Prong Strategy | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
Leading learning theorist David Kolb describes learning as a four-step process consisting of Concrete Experiences, Reflective Observation, Abstract Conceptualization and Active Experimentation. Exper
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Demystifying Creativity: Four Ways to Easily Foster Student Creativity

Demystifying Creativity: Four Ways to Easily Foster Student Creativity | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
By Kevin Parr My son Mason is well into the stage where he wants to do everything by himself. It is a wonderful and fascinating phase, although it can be frustrating at times. For example, Mason has developed an interesting yet lengthy process of getting in and out of his car seat. He also has a unique way of climbing a certain structure at the park near our house that is both intriguing and terrifying to watch. Most astonishing, however, is his method of putting on his jacket. As a proud parent, all of these acts of independence are wonderful to watch. As someone who is trying to get somewhere on time, they can be frustrating. As a teacher, they are truly enlightening. As I watch Mason demonstrate his independence, I just can’t get over the fact that there are better, more efficient ways of doing almost everything he does. For example, to put on his jacket, he lays it on the floor, puts his arms in, flips the jacket up and over his head, and—viola—it’s on. Of course, when I try to suggest a more straightforward way of doing things, his response is a very clear, “All by self, Daddy!” And it’s at those times that I realize I should value and celebrate even the simplest expressions of creativity instead of automatically surrendering to conformity and efficiency, both at home and at school. Creativity with a capital “C” versus creativity Creativity has become a hot topic in education. It is almost impossible to read anything now that doesn’t mention the critical role creativity plays in the futures of our students and how schools should devote more energy to fostering it. And it’s true; creativity does play an important role in today’s world and schools should be doing more to promote it. Most of what I read, however, refers to what I call creativity with a capital “C” and it seems a bit out of reach for me in my classroom. Examples of creativity with a capital “C” are students creating robots, constructing utopian civilizations in the class Minecraft lounge, or engaging in other applications that seem equally unrealistic for me in my current setting. The more I watch Mason, though, I realize that although some of the more publicized examples of student creativity are out of my reach, there are still ways I can encourage students to pursue their own method of thinking and doing things. Here are some ways teachers—no matter their circumstance—can foster student creativity. 1. Ask better questions. I feel teachers, myself included, often fixate on one right answer and one right way to do things. In supporting this, we ask bad questions. Obviously, there are times when you need to ask basic recall questions that only have one right answer; for example, students need to understand the story they are reading before they can think deeply about it. Asking deeper questions, however, helps students move beyond the mentality that there is only one right answer for everything. Deeper questions also allow for divergent thinking, yet require students to justify why their responses are reasonable. If a student has a response and a reasonable justification, teachers should try to honor it even if it does not exactly match how the teacher would respond. Teachers can and should explain their thought processes, but shouldn’t dictate that their answers are right and their students’ answers are wrong. Teachers stifle the creativity they are trying to grow within their students by mandating one right answer all the time. When students are invited to think creatively, everyone benefits because students are exposed to other opinions and ways of thinking. 2. Assign more projects. Projects can inspire creativity, especially when students must prepare and present a final product to a real audience. When left to their own devices, it is amazing what kids will come up with. Recently, I attempted a project approach for the first time with a unit that tied in health and math with cooking. The project differed from my former, more traditional approaches because it allowed room for students’ creativity, from the development of a team name, to the layout of the information, to the presentation of the salads they made. In hindsight, the most amazing thing I realized was that this was just the beginning. I began asking myself, “How can I design this and other projects to allow for even more creativity?” When teachers start thinking this way, they will be well on their way to preparing kids for the ever-changing world that lies ahead. 3. Let students explore and struggle. When was the last time you presented something (for example, a multistep word problem in math) and let students really struggle to make sense of it and figure it out on their own? This is how it usually looks in my classroom: I present the problem and after allowing kids a few token minutes to try it out on their own, a few students share ideas and we pick the “best” way to solve it and replicate that process on succeeding problems. If we really want to foster creativity, we must allow kids time to struggle and create their own understanding and way of doing things. Again, there is real value in direct instruction, but giving students knowledge and telling them what to do with it are different. 4. Let kids design their own assessments. My next goal in cultivating student creativity is to allow them to design their own assessments. What could be a bigger honor than outlining what skills and knowledge students need to demonstrate and then having them design the task? Sure, many may choose a traditional testing format, but I can also imagine comic books, nonlinguistic representations, digital media creations, how-to guides and how not-to guides. The possibilities would be endless, and that’s the point. Fostering creativity in our students is paramount to our work as teachers in today’s schools to prepare kids for success in the 21st century. …
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Barrierefreies E-Learning: Digitale Hürden über­winden | bildungsdoc-Blog | News & Wissenswertes zum Thema Bildung

Bei Barrierefreiheit denken viele erst einmal an fehlende Rampen für Roll­stuhlfahrer. Doch es gibt eben so­viele Hürden wie es unterschiedliche Beh
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Who is Accountable if the Online Training Fails?

Who is Accountable if the Online Training Fails? | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
How is it possible to deliver online training that makes everybody happy? (Who is Accountable if the Online Training Fails?
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[Infographic] Growth in Flipped Learning - EdTechReview™ (ETR)

[Infographic] Growth in Flipped Learning - EdTechReview™ (ETR) | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
Flipped learning is a pedagogical approach in which direct instruction moves from the group learning space to the individual learning space.
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Teaching Is Establishing The Need To Know

Teaching Is Establishing The Need To Know | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
TEST Teaching Is Establishing The Need To Know
by Terry Heick
The above image comes from a presentation from Jesse Stommel , an Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities at University of Wisconsin-Madison.
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Gamification: Your Learners Deserve To Be Delighted And Excited - eLearning Industry

Gamification: Your Learners Deserve To Be Delighted And Excited - eLearning Industry | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
Gamification is an incredible way to engage learners in their training. Learn about the difference between structural and content gamification here...Source: elearningindustry.comSee on Scoop.it - ...
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5 BYOD & Responsive E-Learning tips | Elucidat elearning authoring software

5 BYOD & Responsive E-Learning tips | Elucidat elearning authoring software | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
5 things you should be concerned about when commissioning #elearning or #mlearning. http://t.co/sy61PNETPr
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Metro, other TN school districts stop buying social studies textbooks

Metro, other TN school districts stop buying social studies textbooks | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
Instead, teachers will use online websites and interactive videos for history, geography. (Tenn.
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New Study: Engage Kids with 7x the Effect

New Study: Engage Kids with 7x the Effect | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
The way to engage students is to make sure that they care about the material and that they know how much you care about them.
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Präsentationen mit sozialen Medien interessant gestalten - Lehrer-Online

Präsentationen mit sozialen Medien interessant gestalten - Lehrer-Online | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
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6 tips for creating great e-learning content - eFront Blog

6 tips for creating great e-learning content - eFront Blog | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
Following are 6 small tips to create great e-learning content.
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Studie beweist: Smartphone und TV stumpfen unsere Kinder sozial ab | Androidmag.de

Studie beweist: Smartphone und TV stumpfen unsere Kinder sozial ab | Androidmag.de | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
Was wir schon längst wussten, ist nun amtlich. Zumindest habe es Forscher der University of California (UCLA) nachgewiesen: Kinder verlieren zunehmend ihre
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Benefits of Custom e-Learning Course Development | eLearning Mind

Benefits of Custom e-Learning Course Development | eLearning Mind | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
Think you know all the benefits of custom e-Learning? eLearning Mind reveals three surprising benefits of custom e Learning. Check out the post here!
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Kritik an Studenten: "Ich wünsche mir mehr Widerspruch"

Kritik an Studenten: "Ich wünsche mir mehr Widerspruch" | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
Überall Konsens und marktkonforme Lehre: Uni-Dozentin Christiane Florin ergründet im Interview, warum unsere Studenten so angepasst sind.
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Back to School Activities to Try in Your Class

Back to School Activities to Try in Your Class | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
August 25, 2014
In the series of posts I am sharing here on the back-to-school event, today I uncovered from my archive two awesome posters created by Busy Teacher outlining some interesting ideas...
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Do You Need a Social Media Detox?

Do You Need a Social Media Detox? | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
We all know that social media can be a great tool for teachers, both in the classroom and for professional development purposes.
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An Elearning Design Reading List

An Elearning Design Reading List | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
Several things have led to me actually writing a blog post.  First, I'm home for two whole weeks straight (this alone is a small miracle).  I'm also relatively up to date with my inbox and to do li...
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12 Tips for New Teachers (And Those Starting Anew in 2014)

12 Tips for New Teachers (And Those Starting Anew in 2014) | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
By Jenny Edwards, PhD For all of you new teachers out there (and also those who have been in the profession for a while now), I wish you years of success, as you are in the greatest position of all— the position to influence the lives of many students. Right now, your current focus is probably on how to have a successful first few weeks of school. What might be the best ways to spend your time as you are preparing for the school year to start? What are some things you should keep in mind once the students arrive and class begins? Here are 12 tips for success as you begin your career (or school year) and continue growing in the teaching profession. Familiarize yourself with your school district’s website before school starts. Become familiar with the curriculum you will be using and learn about the district policies. Get to know your colleagues and begin to develop a good working relationship with them. Have the attitude of a learner. Be willing to share your ideas with them and be willing to learn from them. Get to know other school personnel, such as the secretaries, custodians, and cafeteria workers. Go out of your way to greet them. Seek out mentors. Identify people from whom you would especially like to learn and get to know them. Set up a classroom management system from the beginning of the year. Ask your colleagues what works for them and use ideas from your teacher training. Know exactly how you will manage the students the minute they walk in the door and use these strategies consistently throughout the year. Create lessons and materials for the first week of school prior to the start of school so that you will know exactly what you are going to do and will have everything ready to go. Think through when students will be turning in major assignments and stagger the due dates. Build positive relationships with your students by smiling, getting to know them, and treating them with respect. Build positive relationships with the parents of your students by making positive phone calls to them in the first several weeks of school. Introduce yourself, say something positive about their child, and let them know that you are looking forward to working with them and their child. Make sure they know how they can contact you and when you will be available. Make use of small bits of time throughout the day. If you have five extra minutes, what might you be able to accomplish? Call the parent immediately should an incident occur to explain what happened. People usually believe the first person they hear. Be sure to inform your principal as well. Ask yourself empowering questions throughout the day, such as “How can I help each of my students to enjoy learning today?” or “How can I build a positive relationship with each student?” Find more resources for heading back to school on ASCD's website. For more from Jenny Edwards, check out her new publication Time To Teach: How Do I Get Organized And Work Smarter?.

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An illustrated guide to illustrating elearning - TrainingZone.co.uk (blog)

An illustrated guide to illustrating elearning - TrainingZone.co.uk (blog) | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
An illustrated guide to illustrating elearning
TrainingZone.co.uk (blog)
Who doesn't like cartoons? Illustrations are designed to break up large amounts of text, introducing fun and laughter into the process.
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Report on Social Media in Education (Part 1) [Facebook and Twitter] - EdTechReview™ (ETR)

Report on Social Media in Education (Part 1) [Facebook and Twitter] - EdTechReview™ (ETR) | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
Social media in education is a medium for educators & learners like teachers, students to express, learn and share their views, problems with others, irrespective of the language, place, time, religion (Report on Social Media in Education [Facebook...
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Excellent “Reading Research Summary” From Scholastic

Excellent “Reading Research Summary” From Scholastic | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
Scholastic has just unveiled a new website focused on the joy of reading. It includes a number of materials, including videos and a free downloadable book with contributions from educators about their own reading experiences.
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