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Learning requires a change in the brain...

Learning requires a change in the brain... | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 14, 2014 8:15 AM

How do students learn? There are many concepts that look at this question, and the visual above in one way to view this. 

To the left you have a box that shows that students take in content by reading, writing, listening and experiencing, and that to comprehend and interpret content they must have prior knowledge, make observations, identify main and supporting ideas and gather evidence.

In the midle section the student has to take the input and use critical thinking skills. To do this they must also be engaged in and committed to the learning process. 

And the final section looks at their output, how does the student show what they have learned.

In all phases technology may play a role.

This visual would be great to spark discussion amongst faculy.

Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, September 23, 2014 7:21 PM

Aprendizagem requer mudanças no cérebro.

Uma conversa interessante sobre pensamento critico.

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The Science of Attention (And Why eLearning Professionals Should Care)

The Science of Attention (And Why eLearning Professionals Should Care) | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
Paying attention is a task people take for granted; they rarely stop to think about the complex neurocognitive processes involved. However, it is an

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Your Brain at Work - New tools and Approaches have already Produced New Insights

Your Brain at Work - New tools and Approaches have already Produced New Insights | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it

When Apple fanatics lined up to get the new iPhone in 2011, the New York Times published an op-ed titled “You Love Your iPhone. Literally.” It described an unpublished experiment in which the author scanned the brains of 16 people as they heard and watched audio and video of ringing or vibrating iPhones. The scans showed activity in the insular cortex—an area that activates when someone experiences love. “Subjects’ brains responded...as they would respond to the presence or proximity of a girlfriend, boyfriend, or family member,” the author wrote. “They loved their iPhones.”

 

Dozens of neuroscientists cosigned a letter to the Times condemning the article, noting that one-third of all neuroimaging studies reveal activity in the insular cortex. It’s active when people sense temperature changes or even just breathe. In fact, in 2007 the Times itself had published an op-ed showing that the same area of the brain was engaged when subjects felt the opposite of love. Titled “This Is Your Brain on Politics,” the article linked activity in the insular cortex to disgust and asserted that it was particularly strong in men who saw the term “Republican.” Scientists wrote a letter protesting that article, too.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
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Why You Need To Feed Your Brain Different Experiences

Why You Need To Feed Your Brain Different Experiences | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
You wouldn't eat one food all the time, so why do you spend all of your workday in front of a screen?

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Graeme Reid's curator insight, August 6, 2014 10:48 PM

Encapsulated in the phrase - ''Variety is the spice of life".

Judih Weinstein Haggai's curator insight, August 7, 2014 12:15 AM

Good ideas - cognitive diversity to keep  our brain in shape

54321ignition's curator insight, August 7, 2014 7:39 AM

Yes, I'd recommend parachuting to everyone afraid of heights! It cured mine.

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Using Brain Research to Design Better eLearning Courses: 7 Tips for Success

Using Brain Research to Design Better eLearning Courses: 7 Tips for Success | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
Jey principles from neuroscience research paired with tips that will allow course creators to achieve effective eLearning development.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Why we need more visual texts in our teaching and learning

Why we need more visual texts in our teaching and learning | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it

Found this fantastic infographic touting the success of infographics. Reading it ( or more correctly, viewing it) immediately focused my thoughts on the use of visual texts in classrooms today. Click on the screenshot above to view the animated, interactive info graphic that presents  13 reasons why we should use infographics ( or visual texts in general). Unlike other infographics I link to on Mr G Online, I’m not going to discuss the specific points presented – that would be contradictory to the message of the infographic. I’ll let you get your own meaning from it. However, I am going to reflect on how it made me consider the use of visual texts in education.

 

If we take at face value the research this infographic is based on, human beings are, at heart, visual learners. Our first written languages were image based (hieroglyphics). Our first recorded historical artefacts are cave paintings. Before the Bible was printed, the story of Christianity was predominantly told through Church Art. Museums are based on our desire to see artefacts firsthand.

 

I in no way want to devalue the importance of reading. Making connections with the printed word promotes creativity and imagination as we strive to interpret the  detailed writings of an author. Words allow us to add our own meaning to written texts rather than have an artist’s or film maker’s interpretation forced upon us. Reading is vital for learning and engaging with the world.


Via Beth Dichter, Miloš Bajčetić
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Nancy Jones's curator insight, July 15, 2013 1:50 PM
 

As a visual learner myself, I love onto graphics, beginning with the dAiley ones posted NBC USA Today since its inception. 

Caleb Yap's curator insight, July 17, 2013 11:30 PM

really? more of these non-classical pedagogical methods?

Audrey's curator insight, August 29, 2013 2:53 PM

You can absorb the visual faster and make sense of it in a holistic way; particularly if you spend time engaging with the information from different physical points of view. The information is embedded in the memory because the individual is encouraged to project their own meaning.  Having been directed to view educational materials, the learner can them be asked questions to test their understanding. 

 

Visual learning is necessary from a young age and is what home school sources learning is all about.