E-Learning Method...
Follow
Find tag "assessment"
1.9K views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Elke Lackner from E-Learning and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

Assessment, Choice, and the Learning Brain

Assessment, Choice, and the Learning Brain | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
The growing field of educational neuroscience, converging developmental psychology, cognitive science, and education, can help teachers and school leaders rethink how they approach assessments. While some of its initial findings merely support what educators have intuitively believed, it is also challenging many assumptions and providing new insight into best educational practices, especially regarding assessment.

Via Dennis T OConnor
more...
Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, October 29, 2014 3:51 PM

Assessments-- high stakes testing in particular, have changed the learning environments of classrooms across the country. 


This insightful article may help everyone gain a better understanding of what the research says about teaching and learning.

ajinugraha's curator insight, November 1, 2014 12:13 AM

http://manfaatbuahdansayuran.oherbal.net/2014/11/01/manfaat-bawang-merah-untuk-berbagai-penyakit/

Vanessa Monell Mercado's curator insight, November 2, 2014 7:41 AM

I want to do a PhD on Educational Neuroscience, any suggestions? Not for the money, but for the learning and helping educators part!

Rescooped by Elke Lackner from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Teachers Surveyed on Using Games in Class

Teachers Surveyed on Using Games in Class | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
We have an early look at some of the interesting data coming out of a larger report on teacher attitudes around the use of games in the classroom. The numbers hint at wider use of games in the classroom and indicate teachers see the real benefit of games in helping low-performing students.

Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 9, 2014 9:17 PM

Do you think games have a place in your classroom? This newly released data is from a survey of 694 K-8 teachers in the U.S. that the Joan Ganz Cooney Center conducted in 2013 to see how teachers are using digital games in their classrooms.
What are some of the findings?

* 74% of teachers are using games in their classroom

* 55% of students play games at least once a week

* 72% of students access games on a PC or a Mac, and 41% of teachers use a white board to share games

* The two greatest barriers are the time it takes to implement games (45%) and the cost of the games (44%)

This post from Games and Learning provides the current data in both a visual and written form. There is much more to be found on the website. You may also want to check out the Joan Ganz Cooney Center. They have also published an article on this which may be found at http://www.joanganzcooneycenter.org/2014/06/09/digital-games-in-the-classroom-a-national-surevy/

Rescooped by Elke Lackner from EdTech Tools
Scoop.it!

12 Things You Should Never Do When You Teach Online

12 Things You Should Never Do When You Teach Online | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
You are never alone when teaching online. As a writer and teacher, I'm here to share my experiences and insights so that you will not hit the ground. We

Via Patty Ball
more...
Carmenne K. Thapliyal's curator insight, August 25, 2013 7:09 AM

Superb article

Dico Krommenhoek's curator insight, August 26, 2013 9:44 AM

Thanks for sharing. Many of the ideas are directly applicable in a face to face classroom as well, aren't they?

Scott Holcomb's curator insight, October 4, 2013 2:46 AM
(null)
Rescooped by Elke Lackner from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

5 Research-Based Tips for Providing Students with Meaningful Feedback

5 Research-Based Tips for Providing Students with Meaningful Feedback | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
Teacher feedback must be informative and encouraging for students to fully understand whether they're learning and what they can do to improve the learning process.

Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 3, 2014 10:32 PM

Do you know how to provide meaningful feedback to your students. This post in Edutopia provides five suggestions, all of which are included in the illustration above (located here).

What are the suggestions?

* Be as specific as possible

* The sooner the better

* Address the learner's advancement toward a goal

* Present feedback carefully

* Involve learners in the process

Additional information on these five suggestions are in the post.

Mary Starry's curator insight, September 14, 2014 7:38 PM

The role of immediate, meaningful feedback must also be incorporated into the active learning environment.

Rescooped by Elke Lackner from Elearning, pédagogie, technologie et numérique...
Scoop.it!

Infographie : "How to Give Feedback in eLearning Assessments"

Infographie : "How to Give Feedback in eLearning Assessments" | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it
The How to Give Feedback in eLearning Assessments Infographic presents 5 tips to provide effective feedback on your eLearning course assessments.

Via uTOP Inria, CECI Jean-François
more...
uTOP Inria's curator insight, May 21, 2014 2:39 AM

(e-Learning Infographics, 19/05/2014)

CECI Jean-François's curator insight, May 21, 2014 2:56 AM

La qualité de l'apprentissage ne sera pas la même suivant l'approche choisie. L'une encourage, l'autre sanctionne. La 1ere développe un état d'esprit de développement, la 2e un état d'esprit fixe ou tout doit être réussi du 1er coup. Cela stigmatise l'erreur comme ne pardonnant pas et ne faisant pas partie du processus d'apprentissage...

Rescooped by Elke Lackner from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
Scoop.it!

No. 8 aha moment: web 2.0 will change everything in online learning | Tony Bates - online learning and distance education resources

No. 8 aha moment: web 2.0 will change everything in online learning | Tony Bates - online learning and distance education resources | E-Learning Methodology | Scoop.it

A broad range of tools with common characteristics that are conveniently lumped together as web 2.0 will fundamentally change the design of online learning and even more significantly, the relationship between post-secondary instructor and student. … The general characteristics of web 2.0 are as follows:

- End-user control/authoring

- Collaboration and sharing

- Collective intelligence

- Low-cost/free, adaptive software

- Rich media

- Portability/mobility


Via Peter B. Sloep
more...
Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, March 25, 2013 12:33 PM

Tony Bates reports that he has "grown increasingly convinced that [web 2.0 tools] have the power to really revolutionize university teaching in particular". Unfortunately, he says, formal post-secondary education shows few signs of have understood this message. This is a pity, he continues, as web 2.0 tools i) can facilitate 21st century knowledge workers,  ii) lend themselves to constructivist approaches, iii) are familiar to students, iv) are more engaging for student.

 

These are the reasons most people will mention for why we should invoke web 2.0 tools. However, Tony's fifth reason is not so familiar and arguably the most powerful one. Eventually, he claims, web 2.0 tools will radically change student assessment. No more paper and pencil or computer marked assignments, but assignment via portfolios and the use of multimedia.  That of course requires us to rethink the idea of a course completely.

 

It also shows that MOOCs really are 'education as we know it' in an online mould. If Tony is right, then we may wonder if quality will prevail (that is redesign of education making full use of the affordances of web 2.0 tools) or if maximizing revenues will prevail (that is, sticking to existing models but broadcasting the content even more widely). Seen in this way, MOOCs really are web 1.0, the information web, rather than the social web that web 2.0 is. So, a step back rather than a step forward. (@pbsloep)

 

Louise Lewis's curator insight, March 26, 2013 6:30 AM
Yes, totally agree with the comments re MOOCS being web 1.0 but what if they are just another resources for a learner in a learner-centred environment?