E-learning for deaf people
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Handbook for Emerging Technologies for Learning


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Cíntia Rabello, ThePinkSalmon
Liliane Brito de Melo's insight:

FYI 

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Applications Now Open: 2013 e-Learning: Shaping the Internet--History & Future | CommunityTeleCentre.org

Applications Now Open: 2013 e-Learning: Shaping the Internet--History & Future | CommunityTeleCentre.org | E-learning for deaf people | Scoop.it

Applications are now open for the Internet Society’s Next Generation Leaders (NGL) e-Learning programme “Shaping the Internet – History and Futures.”

 

The Internet Society is pleased to call for applications from talented individuals seeking to join the new generation of Internet leaders, who will address the critical technology, policy, business, and education challenges that lie ahead.

For 2013 the Internet Society is offering two classes in English, one in French, and one in Spanish. All classes will start the week of 27 May 2013.

The course, “Shaping the Internet – History and Futures”, will be delivered by the Internet Society through its own e-Learning platform and learning methodology that features a combination of in-depth course materials, weekly online chats, group projects and a case study examination, all led by an expert moderator.

The NGL programme is designed to advance the careers of individuals who have the potential to become local, regional, and international leaders within the Internet technology, policy, and governance communities. The curriculum empowers participants to share their particular expertise with colleagues while acquiring knowledge in areas outside of their specialties.

Places in the eLearning course are strictly limited, so all applications will be subject to a thorough selection process. The deadline for applications is 15 April 2013.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Liliane Brito de Melo's insight:

Evento sobre e-learning #FYI

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How Copyright Law Keeps E-Books Inaccessible for People With Disabilities | Slate Magazine

How Copyright Law Keeps E-Books Inaccessible for People With Disabilities | Slate Magazine | E-learning for deaf people | Scoop.it

Recently, the White House made about 114,000 new friends by agreeing that it should be legal to unlock your cellphone. In a response to a We the People petition, a White House adviser wrote that the Obama administration would work to address a recent decision by the librarian of Congress that made unlocking your cellphone illegal under the anti-circumvention measures of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

 

The unlocking furor is just the latest example of popular opposition to the DMCA’s dreaded anti-circumvention measures. The Electronic Frontier Foundation recently issued a report arguing that over the last 15 years, the DMCA has impeded scientific research, innovation, fair use, and more. But among the DMCA’s many flaws is a significant one of which most people aren’t aware: For more than a decade, the act has imposed a barrier to access for people with disabilities. It hinders access to books, movies, and television shows by making the development, distribution, and use of cutting-edge accessibility technology illegal.

 

Making creative works accessible often involves transforming content from one medium to another—such as adapting the audio of a television show to closed captions to make it accessible to people who are deaf or hard of hearing. Copyright law ordinarily vests authors of creative works with the exclusive right to create adaptations, such as translations to foreign languages. But making works accessible to people with disabilities is arguably exempt from copyright law under the fair use doctrine and other laws like the Chafee Amendment to the Copyright Act. Congress, federal courts, the U.S. Copyright Office, and even the World Intellectual Property Organization have begun to recognize that it’s bad policy to block efforts to create accessible versions of copyrighted works.


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At least, that’s the case with physical and analog media. But publishers, video programmers, and other copyright owners lock down digital content with digital rights management technology designed to limit users’ ability to access, copy, and adapt copyrighted works to specific circumstances. And copyright owners frequently fail to account for the need to adapt DRM-encumbered works to make them accessible to people with disabilities.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Liliane Brito de Melo's insight:

Sobre a inclusão de Pessoas com necessidades especiais / Pessoas com Deficiência.

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