E-Learning and Online Teaching
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E-Learning and Online Teaching
Curated Content: UW-Stout E-Learning and Online Teaching Graduate Certificate
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Personality Matters When Teaching Online

Personality Matters When Teaching Online | E-Learning and Online Teaching | Scoop.it
Online instructors are hired for their experience and expertise, but don't under estimate the importance of personality when it comes to student learning.

Via Beret Furuseth Hagen
Maggie Rouman's insight:

Great advice for new online teachers!

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Beret Furuseth Hagen's curator insight, October 1, 2015 2:11 PM

Another good article by Errol Craig Sull- this time about creating an online presence in your eLearning classroom.

Maggie Rouman's comment, October 2, 2015 11:01 AM
Great online, especially good advice for new online teachers! Thanks for sharing!
Joyce Valenza's curator insight, October 3, 2015 8:16 AM

An important consideration. 

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Are Teachers of Tomorrow Prepared to Use Innovative Tech?

Are Teachers of Tomorrow Prepared to Use Innovative Tech? | E-Learning and Online Teaching | Scoop.it

By Katrina Schwartz |


With a new generation of teachers coming into the work force, there’s a discrepancy between what principals expect of teachers-in-training and what they’re actually learning in school.

A new Project Tomorrow report surveying principals concluded that they want to hire new teachers with creative ideas about how technology can be leveraged to create authentic and differentiated learning experiences. But student-teachers report that their tech training focuses only on simple management tools. At the same time, the report concludes that those who have the biggest influence on new teachers — veteran educators —  don’t always embrace new ways of using technology to engage students.

Dennis T OConnor's insight:

Aspiring teachers may need to look beyond the basic training received in a school of education.  A new teacher who knows how to learn with technology should be able to leverage that understanding into teaching skills... especially if they are self-directed learners. 

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Tim Hopper's curator insight, December 16, 2014 5:42 PM

We need reflect on how ed tech shifts our pedagogical practices. Minimum is individualized learning.

 

Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, December 18, 2014 7:17 AM

I think most future teachers are ill-equipped to use technology effectively primarily because they don't have the resources nor the opportunity to learn how to use technology--"innovative" or otherwise--in their own learning.


"Principals want new teachers to know how to use technology to create authentic learning experiences for students (75 percent) and how to leverage technology to differentiate instruction (68 percent) before they apply for a position at their school." It doesn't help that many principals might think they know what these terms and phrases mean but they might know really know the implications for making sure teachers have the best possible skills and the best possible resources.

WEAC's curator insight, December 18, 2014 10:17 AM

A new Project Tomorrow report surveying principals concluded that they want to hire new teachers with creative ideas about how technology can be leveraged to create authentic and differentiated learning experiences. But student-teachers report that their tech training focuses only on simple management tools.

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Teacher Statistics: How Teachers Make a Difference

Teacher Statistics: How Teachers Make a Difference | E-Learning and Online Teaching | Scoop.it
You know that bumper sticker that says, “If you can read this, thank a teacher”? It’s the literal truth. While most of us spend more time thinking about reality TV stars and pro athletes, teachers are among the few people who truly affect our ...

Via Beth Dichter
Dennis T OConnor's insight:

I'm a lifelong teacher.  I believe in the iceberg principle.  As a teacher you only see the tip of the iceberg.  Occassionally you hear from a student who thanks you. It's the best feeling in the world.  At the same time for evey one that reaches out there are many who still feel the positive change you helped bring about. 


I've said thank you to many of my own great teachers (but not all). 

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Tiziana Rosanna Iozzi's curator insight, September 11, 2013 1:37 AM

Un insegnante ha il ruolo di un mentore, è un modello, sa aiutare i ragazzi nelle difficoltà e li incoraggia a seguire i loro sogni... A chi di voi è capitata la fortuna di conoscerne almeno uno/a nella vita?

Darleana McHenry's curator insight, September 11, 2013 11:56 PM

I had the opportunity to tell my first grade teacher thank you 5 years ago. She actually had kept my first grade picture all these years. My teachers were great and school was my favorite place and I excelled there. So thanks to all the teachers that I did not get to thank. :-)

Silvia Nascimento's curator insight, August 6, 2015 9:22 PM

There are days when we ask ourselves why we teach...and this infographic shares lots of reasons for why we teach and how we impact our students...so as a visual to share, or one to look at you when you need some building up.

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New Studies Find That, for Teachers, Experience Really Does Matter

New Studies Find That, for Teachers, Experience Really Does Matter | E-Learning and Online Teaching | Scoop.it
In all, the new studies paint teacher quality as a mutable characteristic that can be developed, rather than a static one that's formed in the first few years on the job.
Dennis T OConnor's insight:

No surprise for me here.  Lifelong learning and an ongoing commitment to meaningful professional development are central to what I do and who I am.  


In other words, I am biased. I believe great teachers develop over time.  




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Why We Believe in Our Students, a Timely Reminder

Why We Believe in Our Students, a Timely Reminder | E-Learning and Online Teaching | Scoop.it

By: Maryellen Weimer, PhD in Teaching Professor Blog -


For most of us, it’s that time of the semester when we are least likely to think positively about students. We’re tired, they’re tired, and there are still the proverbial miles to go. Some students have finally figured out they’re in trouble in the course, but none of their difficulties derive from anything they’ve done (or haven’t done), or so they think. Others remain lost in a thick fog that obscures even very fundamental course content. Passivity is the default mode for what feels like an increasingly large group. If there’s any lull in the action, they settle back, quickly finding their way to places of mental relaxation.


An exaggeration, perhaps, but it’s easy to lose faith in students when so many of them seem bent on making poor decisions about learning, which is why we may need a post that reminds us how much all students need teachers who believe in them.

Dennis T OConnor's insight:

Timely words for the end of the semester.

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University of Wisconsin Stout: Interested in online teaching and learning?

Information about our Graduate Certificate in Online Teaching and Learning.