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Rescooped by Kenneth Carnesi from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
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Journalists, Social News, and 4 PR Takeaways: New Study

Journalists, Social News, and 4 PR Takeaways: New Study | e-commerce & social media | Scoop.it

In the age of social media democratization, news distribution is no exception.  Nowadays journalists are competing head-to-head with brands and publishers for the most sharable content. The changing landscape of interconnected social news distribution and consumption also means that PR communicators need to strengthen their storytelling abilities and social angles to support their chances of media coverage in this competitive environment.A recent survey by  Edelman,  NewsWhip  and Muck Rack with an infographic sheds light on how PR folks can exploit these changes to get the most coverage possible.  Here are 4 takeaways for PR profs....


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, February 8, 2015 4:33 AM

This study gives us a valuable perspective on PR and journalism in the age of social media. Hint: think storytelling!

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, February 9, 2015 2:28 AM

The story is the driving force, whether it is in the field of reporting, or marketing, or even teaching. The pressure of finding a story good enough to tell, and being able to do so in an interesting manner can make all the difference to the news report, or the boardroom presentation before the takeover, or even the class room on jurisprudence!

Rescooped by Kenneth Carnesi from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
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Why there's reason to be optimistic about journalism's future

Why there's reason to be optimistic about journalism's future | e-commerce & social media | Scoop.it

Caroline Little, CEO CEO of the Newspaper Association of America (NAA), says despite what cynics say, the future of newspapers is bright. In an article published Friday, she shared some NAA research:


"Our audience has grown with the shifting digital landscape, and we’re seeing increased levels of audience engagement and new avenues of consumption. We made the first gain in circulation revenue since 2003, with revenue rising by 5 percent — from $10 billion to $10.5 billion — as digital subscriptions grew dramatically.


The number of unique visitors engaged with U.S. newspaper digital content hit a new high in September 2013, totaling 141 million adults — an impressive increase of 11 percent since just June. We’ve changed with the times to fit the needs of our audience, from print to website to tablet to mobile, adapting our content and strategies for delivery. And it’s working. Across all digital platforms, 71 percent of adults in this country engage with newspaper content, and 55 percent of those visitors consume newspaper content on mobile devices"....


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, January 5, 2014 10:50 AM

a few traditional media with deep pockets adapting but most are struggling to get digital. Changes to engage young readers including younger op ed writers and reporters is essential for the futurefuture.

Celeste Côté's curator insight, January 5, 2014 6:32 PM

A refreshing smidgen of encouragement amidst all the despair I keep reading about...

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All you need to know about journalism: click here

All you need to know about journalism: click here | e-commerce & social media | Scoop.it

In the last few weeks the shooting down of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, the Ukrainian crisis and the situation in the Gaza Strip are monopolizing media attention....


Last Wednesday the Twitter account of the Associated Press posted this tweet:

BREAKING: Dutch military plane carrying bodies from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crash lands in Eindhoven.

The news was verified, the tweet was not wrong from a grammatical point of view, however there was an ambiguity whereby if the word 'crash' is read as a part of the verb 'crashland' rather than as a noun, the meaning becomes the plane which was carrying the bodies of the passengers of the MH17 had crashed. A little later, the account   clarified the misunderstanding, but the damage was done with the tweet wrongly interpreted and already shared by thousands of people,   sparking the most varied reactions.


The episode has prompted Megan Garber of The Atlantic to write a piece about the use of "breaking news" designation. According to Garber, it was not a necessary piece of news to add to many others re-launched as indispensable 'breaking news' (a plane has landed, after all: it is news in an article, in a context, but not breaking news itself). It is useless to engulf the news ecosystem. "The term 'breaking' is quickly losing its meaning," Garber explains, in agreement with what Felix Salmon stated during the last edition of the International Journalism Festival....


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, July 26, 2014 9:45 AM

The global boom of fact-checking and other current journalism challenges is explored in this excellent post from the IJF.