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(e)Books and (e)Resources for Learning & Teaching
A repository of books and resources on learning and teaching
Curated by Daniel Tan
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Education struggles to respond to the potential of Cloud computing

Education struggles to respond to the potential of Cloud computing | (e)Books and (e)Resources for Learning & Teaching | Scoop.it
How should education respond to Cloud Computing developments? What is the role of managers and leaders?

Via Rui Guimarães Lima
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kelvinsmim's curator insight, December 23, 5:24 AM

chevrolet impala alternator

kelvinsmim's curator insight, December 23, 5:26 AM

chevrolet impala stater moter

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Instructional Design Models and Theories - eLearning Industry

Instructional Design Models and Theories - eLearning Industry | (e)Books and (e)Resources for Learning & Teaching | Scoop.it
At the Instructional Design Models and Theories Journey you will find 33 Instructional Design Models and Theories. A New IDM Will Be Added Every Week!
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Building a Productive Learning Culture: Advancing the Organization’s Learning Capability

Building a Productive Learning Culture: Advancing the Organization’s Learning Capability | (e)Books and (e)Resources for Learning & Teaching | Scoop.it
In a previous blog, “Building a Productive Learning Culture: Rightsizing Learning Opportunities,” we explored the ways that L&D teams can curate learning opportunities to offer those that are most relevant to employees. In this blog, we’ll look at how to teach employees how to learn—rather than just telling them what to learn.
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Top 100 Tools for Learning 2014

Top 100 Tools for Learning 2014 | (e)Books and (e)Resources for Learning & Teaching | Scoop.it
Results of the 8th Annual Survey of Learning Tools
Daniel Tan's insight:

The updated list with some old favourites still there. Like the Forbes 500, i suspect some significant changes with each year.

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Welcome // | DiRT Directory

Welcome // | DiRT Directory | (e)Books and (e)Resources for Learning & Teaching | Scoop.it
The DiRT Directory is a registry of digital research tools for scholarly use.

Via Alastair Creelman, Jesús Salinas
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Connectivism | Visual.ly

Connectivism | Visual.ly | (e)Books and (e)Resources for Learning & Teaching | Scoop.it
This infographic outlines the learning theory pioneered by George Siemens and Stephen Downes.

Via Klaus Meschede
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Brain Rules: 12 Things We Know About How The Brain Works | Farnam Street

Brain Rules: 12 Things We Know About How The Brain Works | Farnam Street | (e)Books and (e)Resources for Learning & Teaching | Scoop.it
Brain Rules: 12 Things We Know About How The Brain Works

by Shane Parrish

If workplaces had nap rooms, multitasking was frowned upon, and meetings were held during walks, we’d be vastly more productive.

Here are 12 things we know about how the brain works from Brain Rules.

Rule #1 Exercise boosts brain power
Wondering whether there is a relationship between exercise and mental alertness? The answer is yes.

Just about every mental test possible was tried. No matter how it was measured, the answer was consistently yes: A lifetime of exercise can result in a sometimes astonishing elevation in cognitive performance, compared with those who are sedentary. Exercisers outperform couch potatoes in tests that measure long-term memory, reasoning, attention, problem-solving, even so-called fluid-intelligence tasks. These tasks test the ability to reason quickly and think abstractly, improvising off previously learned material in order to solve a new problem. Essentially, exercise improves a whole host of abilities prized in the classroom and at work.

Rule #2 Survival
The human brain evolved, too.

The brain is a survival organ. It is designed to solve problems related to surviving in an unstable outdoor environment and to do so in nearly constant motion (to keep you alive long enough to pass your genes on). We were not the strongest on the planet but we developed the strongest brains, the key to our survival. … The strongest brains survive, not the strongest bodies. … Our ability to understand each other is our chief survival tool. Relationships helped us survive in the jungle and are critical to surviving at work and school today. … If someone does not feel safe with a teacher or boss, he or she may not perform as well. … There is no greater anti-brain environment than the classroom and cubicle.

Rule #3: Every brain is wired differently

What you do and learn in life physically changes what your brain looks like – it literally rewires it. … Regions of the brain develop at different rates in different people. The brains of school children are just as unevenly developed as their bodies. Our school system ignores the fact that every brain is wired differently. We wrongly assume every brain is the same.

Rule #4: We don’t pay attention to boring things

The brain is not capable of multi-tasking. We can talk and breathe, but when it comes to higher level tasks, we just can’t do it. … Workplaces and schools actually encourage this type of multi-tasking. Walk into any office and you’ll see people sending e-mail, answering their phones, Instant Messaging, and on MySpace—all at the same time. Research shows your error rate goes up 50% and it takes you twice as long to do things. When you’re always online you’re always distracted. So the always online organization is the always unproductive organization.

We must do something emotionally relevant every 10 minutes to reset our attention.
10-minute-rule

Rule #5: Repeat to remember

Improve your memory by elaborately encoding it during its initial moments. Many of us have trouble remembering names. If at a party you need help remembering Mary, it helps to repeat internally more information about her. “Mary is wearing a blue dress and my favorite color is blue.” It may seem counterintuitive at first but study after study shows it improves your memory.

Rule #6: Remember to repeat

How do you remember better? Repeated exposure to information / in specifically timed intervals / provides the most powerful way to fix memory into the brain. … Deliberately re-expose yourself to the information more elaborately if you want the retrieval to be of higher quality. Deliberately re-expose yourself to the information more elaborately, and in fixed, spaced intervals, if you want the retrieval to be the most vivid it can be. Learning occurs best when new information is incorporated gradually into the memory store rather than when it is jammed in all at once. … Memory is enhanced by creating associations between concepts. This experiment has been done hundreds of times, always achieving the same result: Words presented in a logically organized, hierarchical structure are much better remembered than words placed randomly—typically 40 percent better.

Rule #7: Sleep well, think well

The bottom line is that sleep loss means mind loss. Sleep loss cripples thinking, in just about every way you can measure thinking. Sleep loss hurts attention, executive function, immediate memory, working memory, mood, quantitative skills, logical reasoning ability, general math knowledge.

As for naps

Napping is normal. Ever feel tired in the afternoon? That’s because your brain really wants to take a nap. There’s a battle raging in your head between two armies. Each army is made of legions of brain cells and biochemicals –- one desperately trying to keep you awake, the other desperately trying to force you to sleep. Around 3 p.m., 12 hours after the midpoint of your sleep, all your brain wants to do is nap.

The ideal time to nap – the nap zone
nap zone

One more tip, “[d]on’t schedule important meetings at 3 p.m. It just doesn’t make sense.”

Rule #8: Stressed brains don’t learn the same way

Your brain is built to deal with stress that lasts about 30 seconds. The brain is not designed for long term stress when you feel like you have no control. The saber-toothed tiger ate you or you ran away but it was all over in less than a minute. If you have a bad boss, the saber-toothed tiger can be at your door for years, and you begin to deregulate. If you are in a bad marriage, the saber-toothed tiger can be in your bed for years, and the same thing occurs. You can actually watch the brain shrink.

What causes stress?

Business professionals have spent a long time studying what types of stress make people less productive and, not surprisingly, have arrived at the same conclusion that Marty Seligman’s German shepherds did: Control is critical. The perfect storm of occupational stress appears to be a combination of two malignant facts: a) a great deal is expected of you and b) you have no control over whether you will perform well.

What affect does stress have on the brain?

Stress damages virtually every kind of cognition that exists. It damages memory and executive function. It can hurt your motor skills. When you are stressed out over a long period of time it disrupts your immune response. You get sicker more often. It disrupts your ability to sleep. You get depressed.

Stress not only lowers performance, but also heightens emotional memory so that the poor performances are very easy for us to remember.

stress

Rule #9: Stimulate more of the senses

Our senses work together so it is important to stimulate them! Your head crackles with the perceptions of the whole world, sight, sound, taste, smell, touch, energetic as a frat party. … Smell is unusually effective at evoking memory. If you’re tested on the details of a movie while the smell of popcorn is wafted into the air, you’ll remember 10-50% more. … Those in multisensory environments always do better than those in unisensory environments. They have more recall with better resolution that lasts longer, evident even 20 years later.

learning

Rule #10: Vision trumps all other senses

We are incredible at remembering pictures. Hear a piece of information, and three days later you’ll remember 10% of it. Add a picture and you’ll remember 65%. … Pictures beat text as well, in part because reading is so inefficient for us. Our brain sees words as lots of tiny pictures, and we have to identify certain features in the letters to be able to read them. That takes time. … Why is vision such a big deal to us? Perhaps because it’s how we’ve always apprehended major threats, food supplies and reproductive opportunity.

pics

Rule #11: Male and female brains are different

What’s different? Mental health professionals have known for years about sex-based differences in the type and severity of psychiatric disorders. Males are more severely afflicted by schizophrenia than females. By more than 2 to 1, women are more likely to get depressed than men, a figure that shows up just after puberty and remains stable for the next 50 years. Males exhibit more antisocial behavior. Females have more anxiety. Most alcoholics and drug addicts are male. Most anorexics are female. … Men and women process certain emotions differently. Emotions are useful. They make the brain pay attention. These differences are a product of complex interactions between nature and nurture.

Rule #12: We are powerful and natural explorers

The desire to explore never leaves us despite the classrooms and cubicles we are stuffed into. Babies are the model of how we learn—not by passive reaction to the environment but by active testing through observation, hypothesis, experiment, and conclusion. Babies methodically do experiments on objects, for example, to see what they will do.
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DocuBase Article: New Modes of Learning and Teaching in Higher Education

DocuBase Article: New Modes of Learning and Teaching in Higher Education | (e)Books and (e)Resources for Learning & Teaching | Scoop.it

Source: European Commission
From Executive Summary:

The higher education landscape is undergoing significant change as a result of technolog- ical innovations. We are witnessing changes in the way higher education is taught and in the way students learn. While the conventional setting ...

Daniel Tan's insight:

The higher education landscape is undergoing significant change as a result of technolog- ical innovations. We are witnessing changes in the way higher education is taught and in the way students learn. While the conventional setting of the lecture hall will continue to form the bedrock of higher education systems, it will be enhanced by the integration of new tools and pedagogies, and it will be complemented by many more online learning opportunities and a greater variety of providers in higher education.

These new technologies and approaches to education are already having a clear and positive impact on higher education provision. They can support efforts within the Bologna Process and the European Union Modernisation Agenda to enhance the quality and extend the reach of higher education across Europe. And they are already starting to facilitate better quality learning and teaching for both on-campus and online provision, as educational resources from around the globe become more freely accessible and more interactive media for learning are employed. Methods of teaching can be better tailored to individual students’ needs and advances in learning analytics are enabling quicker feedback on students’ performance.

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Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: Nice Visual on The Ins and Outs of Professional Development

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: Nice Visual on The Ins and Outs of Professional Development | (e)Books and (e)Resources for Learning & Teaching | Scoop.it

Via victormblancogijon, Alazne González
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The Longest Lasting #Emotions In Customer Experience - Forbes #marketing

The Longest Lasting #Emotions In Customer Experience - Forbes #marketing | (e)Books and (e)Resources for Learning & Teaching | Scoop.it
The Longest Lasting Emotions In Customer Experience. Recent research published in the journal: Motivation and Emotion shows which emotions last the longest and why. We explore what this means for customer service and customer experience leaders.

Via beyondthearc, Fred Zimny, ThePinkSalmon, Alazne González
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Laura Gruici's curator insight, December 1, 2:36 PM

What someone ruminates over holds the emotion longer.  Sadness is the longest held emotion, however joy is pretty close.  What do we do to follow-up to keep the participant thinking in the right direction?

Paula King, Ph.D.'s curator insight, December 2, 10:34 AM

Cool research.  My experience with customer experience confirms this study.  

Florence Rigneau's curator insight, December 11, 8:02 AM

Pour établir votre proposition de valeur, viser à solutionner les "pains" de vos clients en priorité car les émotions de tristesse, haine, anxiété, déception et désespoir persistent plus longtemps que la plupart des autres émotions.

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Top 100 Tools for Learning 2014

The Top 100 Tools for Learning was compiled by Jane Hart from the votes of 1,038 learning professionals from 61 countries worldwide - in both education and wor…
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IRRODL Vol 15, No 5 (2014) - Special Issue: Research into Massive Open Online Courses

IRRODL Vol 15, No 5 (2014) - Special Issue: Research into Massive Open Online Courses | (e)Books and (e)Resources for Learning & Teaching | Scoop.it

Vol 15, No 5 (2014)

Special Issue: Research into Massive Open Online Courses
Guest Editor: George Siemens 


Via Andreas Link
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Isabellefr10's curator insight, October 30, 7:44 PM

hummmmmmmmmm!

John Bostock's curator insight, October 31, 2:35 PM

This looks a very interesting set of papers for all keen followers of MOOC trends and developments.

Kiruthika Ragupathi's curator insight, November 4, 7:04 PM

This special issue reflects the research questions and methodologies deployed by MOOC researchers over the past year and represents the current front line evaluation of how open online courses are impacting education.

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Gamification in Education: Top 10 Gamification Case Studies that will Change our Future

Gamification in Education: Top 10 Gamification Case Studies that will Change our Future | (e)Books and (e)Resources for Learning & Teaching | Scoop.it
The Top 10 Education Gamification Examples according to Pioneer and Stanford Lecturer Yu-kai Chou is 1. Duolingo 2. Ribbon Hero 3. Class Dojo 4....

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Rui Guimarães Lima
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Willem Kuypers's curator insight, December 16, 10:55 AM

Le gamification reste un grand mot sans les finances qui peuvent soutenir ce genre de projet en informatique. Depuis toujours les jeux de rôles, et autres activités ludiques sont faites au cours, mais l'ordinateur rajoute une couche spécifique.

Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, December 17, 1:59 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Tony Guzman's curator insight, December 23, 9:10 AM

Here are 10 examples of gamification tools that could be used in your classroom. Most of these are K-8 examples but some can certainly be used in high school and college environments.

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[Interview] Sir Ken Robinson at Miami Global Forum

So what has this explosion in technology meant for creativity and learning? According to Robinson, the impact has been enormous. “Tools have extended our physical reach, allowing us to do things physically we couldn’t otherwise do, but they’ve also expanded our minds,” he says. “The relationship between tools and intellectual, physical and spiritual development is really powerful.”

 

But while Robinson believes that tools play an important role in creativity, he sees an even higher calling for technology. “The real virtue is not in the tools we create, it is in how we use the tools to create, how creative we become with the tools,” he says. “The challenge with technology is not a technological one, it’s a spiritual one.”

 

For the best performing schools, technology has become an enabler of creativity and innovation, and Robinson believes it has the potential to do even more. “A lot of advocates of the standards movement think that creativity is some recreational activity, a distraction we don’t have time for,” he says. “The real situation is that adopting creative approaches to teaching and learning is among the best ways of engaging kids’ interests, imagination and therefore, raising standards.”

 

Creativity, as defined by Robinson, is also the basis for life-long entrepreneurship and innovation, highly sought-after in the 21st century workforce. He believes that, by unleashing students’ creativity, we can help them develop the kinds of skills that will serve them well in their careers, and as leaders of future generations.

 

In today’s thought-provoking Daily Edventure, Sir Ken and I discuss the state of education, technology and creativity, and what it all means for society. But there’s no better way to close out this post than by sharing the sign-off from the always-quotable Robinson’s keynote: “If we start to rethink some of the fundamental principles of education, [and] its relationship with technology, there’s a better chance that we will create the world that we and our children will want to live in.”


Via Edumorfosis, Jim Lerman, Rui Guimarães Lima
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 20, 7:27 PM

“The real virtue is not in the tools we create, it is in how we use the tools to create, how creative we become with the tools,” he says. “The challenge with technology is not a technological one, it’s a spiritual one.”

 

This is an important consideration. Many so-called tech experts fall short in understanding the key skills are pedagogic/spiritual rather than technical and technological. When we resort to the latter only, we succumb to Technique (Ellul).

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Ubiquity Press

Ubiquity Press | (e)Books and (e)Resources for Learning & Teaching | Scoop.it
Ubiquity Press is an open access publisher of peer-reviewed academic journals, books and data. We operate a highly cost-efficient model that makes quality open access publishing affordable for everyone.

We also make our platform available to the Ubiquity Partner Network, providing the infrastructure and services to enable university and society presses to run sustainably and successfully.
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A ‘starter’ bibliography on design models for teaching and learning

A ‘starter’ bibliography on design models for teaching and learning | (e)Books and (e)Resources for Learning & Teaching | Scoop.it

Via Jesús Salinas
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50 media trends and predictions for 2014 - interactive

50 media trends and predictions for 2014 - interactive | (e)Books and (e)Resources for Learning & Teaching | Scoop.it
A panel of 50 media and technology professionals highlight what they think will be the main trends, predictions and talking points of 2014
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Rescooped by Daniel Tan from Pedalogica: educación y TIC
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Digital Citizenship: Resource Roundup

Digital Citizenship: Resource Roundup | (e)Books and (e)Resources for Learning & Teaching | Scoop.it

Check out Edutopia's collection of articles, videos, and other resources on internet safety, cyberbullying, digital responsibility, and media and digital literacy.

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/11/learning-to-become-a-good-digital-citizen-digital-citizenship/

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/09/06/digital-citizenship-internet-safety-and-cyber-security-advisory-board-run-by-students/

 


Via ICTPHMS, Gust MEES, Alazne González
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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 16, 2:12 PM

Check out Edutopia's collection of articles, videos, and other resources on internet safety, cyberbullying, digital responsibility, and media and digital literacy.


Learn more:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/11/learning-to-become-a-good-digital-citizen-digital-citizenship/


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/09/06/digital-citizenship-internet-safety-and-cyber-security-advisory-board-run-by-students/


Robert Hubert's curator insight, November 18, 4:23 PM

Excellent resources for teaching your child, or your class about Digital Citizenship

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Report highlights 10 trends set to shake up education

Report highlights 10 trends set to shake up education | (e)Books and (e)Resources for Learning & Teaching | Scoop.it
Massive open social learning and dynamic assessment on the Open University’s list

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Alazne González
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Connectivism - Infographic

Connectivism - Infographic | (e)Books and (e)Resources for Learning & Teaching | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Alazne González, Rui Guimarães Lima
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Gonzalo Abio's curator insight, November 17, 6:51 AM

Conectivismo con un toque para profesores y no apenas teórico.

Rescooped by Daniel Tan from Open Educational Resources (OER)
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Erasmus plus 2015 guideline

Are you ready for the new Erasmus plus project proposal? Have you read the new guideline? Do you have the right partner? Here you can find some useful informa…

Via nicoleta susanu, Andreas Link
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nicoleta susanu's curator insight, November 8, 6:14 PM

The Erasmus +: Knowledge Alliances and Sector Skills Alliances Partner Search Tool is an online resource for organisations applying under these actions. The tool helps organisations to identify project partners ahead of submissions for the latest Calls for Proposals.

FCSH/NOVA's curator insight, November 10, 9:26 AM

Guia para apresentação de candidaturas ao ERAMUS +, por Nicoleta Susanu

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Kawachi, Paul - Quality Assurance Guidelines for Open Educational Resources : TIPS Framework, version 2.0

Masses of related research data on QA for Open Learning and OER


Via Andreas Link
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QLET's curator insight, November 10, 6:21 AM

Useful research data on quality for open learning and OER:

 

From the executive summary:

 

"Use a learner-centred approach. Don’t use difficult or complex language, and do check the readability to ensure it is appropriate to age/level. Make sure that the knowledge and skills you want the student to learn are up-to-date, accurate and reliable. Consider asking a subject-matter expert for advice. Be sure the open licence is clearly visible. Ensure your OER is easy to access and engage."