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We need pedagogy, not just cool tools | Sophia Mavridi

We need pedagogy, not just cool tools | Sophia Mavridi | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it

Via Shona Whyte
Pamela Perry King's insight:

So true, so many tools so little time. We must remember our first objective is to be a teacher.

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Shona Whyte's curator insight, December 8, 2013 12:00 PM

"What [teachers] really need is training and clear criteria against which to evaluate and choose technologies; they need to be able to make informed decisions about whether or not to integrate them into their classrooms. They also need to be reassured that if their goal for students is language learning then technology is just a means to an end, not an end in itself."

Victoria Marín's curator insight, December 9, 2013 5:30 AM

I would like to highlight the following from this article:

 

Let’s take the focus off the tool; Instead, let’s focus on:

the pedagogy behind the tool and use it because it addresses our students’ cognitive needs, not because it is available or exciting.

developing critical thinkers with the ability to find, reflect on, curate and synthesise information.

developing lifelong learners who will be able to create and use their Personal Learning Networks to self-educate and grow.

educating digital citizens, that is, responsible members of an increasingly global and interconnected world who know their rights and responsibilities; people who can make informed decisions about the content they create or share and its impact on themselves and on the other members of a digital community.

Sandrine Meldener's curator insight, December 10, 2013 3:46 PM

Soyons centrés sur la pédagogie et non sur la technique.

SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046
Project based learning, thinking critically.
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Why Blogging Is Key to the Future of Higher Ed

Why Blogging Is Key to the Future of Higher Ed | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it
A massive experiment at Virginia Commonwealth University involving 7,000 blogs could lead to a new view on how college students learn.

Via EDTECH@UTRGV
Pamela Perry King's insight:

Every Hero Has A Story....What's Your's?

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Educational Leadership | Assessing Creativity | eLeadership | eSkills

Educational Leadership | Assessing Creativity | eLeadership | eSkills | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it

Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Creativity




Via Gust MEES
Pamela Perry King's insight:

Great Article! To be creative has so many sides!

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Word Cloud Self-Portraits (Then and Now) - Dryden Art

Word Cloud Self-Portraits (Then and Now) - Dryden Art | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it
If I were doing this project today I would have students do every step on the iPad using 


1. Notes to brainstorm and write their 75 words


2. Word Cloud to paste in and create their cloud then design their layout


3. Superimpose to layer their images together, mask their photo, and save


I have a tutorial showing how to layer and mask images using the green screen app here.


The images can also be layered in the latest version of the Green Screen app by DoInk now that you can resize images.


Via John Evans
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mrsjgarcia's curator insight, April 9, 11:40 AM

What a lovely beginning of the year activity. I can also see teacher using it for goal setting or end of the year whatI have learned or summing up the grade type activities.

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8 Ways to Engage eLearners [Infographic]

8 Ways to Engage eLearners [Infographic] | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it
The 8 Ways to Engage eLearners Infographic provides 8 tips that will leave your learners energised and primed to look at your learning in a different light.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Engage-ME%21

 

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

 

https://gustmees.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/practice-21st-century-assessment-flowchart-page2-pdf.pdf

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/01/28/practice-learning-to-learn-example-2/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

 


Via Gust MEES
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terry clarke's curator insight, March 4, 11:01 PM

Superb graphic of the 8 steps important to engaging e-learners, along with an excellent collection of links providing more tips for the teacher/professor whose course includes distance-learners. I certainly could have used this information my last half dozen years as a Marshall Graduate College professor/lecturer!

Tony Guzman's curator insight, March 5, 10:54 AM

This infographic shares 8 excellent tips on how to keep your online learners engaged.

RESENTICE's curator insight, March 6, 7:57 AM

8 astuces pour dynamiser les parcours de formations en ligne et les rendre plus attractifs...

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Leadership Courage: Creating A Culture Where People Feel Safe To Take Risks

Leadership Courage: Creating A Culture Where People Feel Safe To Take Risks | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it
The human ingenuity within any organisation are it's greatest competitive advantage. Yet according to the latest statistics, over half of todays workers are disengaged . When leaders are committed and actively working to engage, inspire and embolden – they unleash untapped potential and raise the bar not just on productivity, but on the value their organization contributes to all stakeholders.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Pamela Perry King's insight:

Have the courage to connect. 

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Andrea Payne's curator insight, January 27, 3:23 PM

I've been reading "Real Influence" by Robert Ullman and John Goulston (http://www.amazon.ca/Real-Influence-Persuade-Without-Pushing/dp/081442015X), and they talk about the importance of connecting authentically.  In Real Influence, Ullman and Goulston refer to this authenticity as "Connected Influence".  

W. Bradley Gooderham's curator insight, January 28, 4:38 PM

The future need innovators and the present needs innovative teachers to nurture them.   Creativity and the ability to innovate are natural characteristics but they must be built up and encouraged in our students, colleagues, and selves.


IteratED is committed to bringing out and nurturing the best in all of our faculty and students. We understand that this requires greater autonomy to make decisions and more trust in the natural ability to learn through exploration.


Are you a teacher who wants to reach for your highest potential? We are here to help you get there. Contact IteratED for more information on how together we can provide exceptional 21st-century education.

Roy Sheneman, PhD's curator insight, March 26, 9:03 AM

Be strong and courageous.

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Twenty Tidbits for New Teachers

In no way, do I want to add to the burden of the already-filled-to-the-brim, new teacher stress bucket. I do however, want to share just 20 tidbits which I hope will help ease new teachers into a fun, successful school year. Some of these will be in the form of social media tools, which I think are awesome, and wish I had had as a newbie. And each little tidbit is linked to a resource which I hope you will find supportive.

1. Seek Your Passion!

As a new teacher this may be the farthest thing from your mind. But... it's the real reason you wanted to be a teacher in the first place. I recommend that you consistently keep in mind what your passion is as a teacher. Read The Passion Driven Classroom by Angela Maiers and Amy Sandvold. It's all about the role passion plays in our work, our lives and our classrooms. Grab a copy and take your time this year to read it.

2. Be a 21st Century Educator

We all hear this term so often around the web... but what does it mean? Visit this wiki for an easy read about what it means to be 21st century educator. It has great resources to take you further in the journey when you're ready. Be sure to view the video at the bottom of the wiki home page.

3. Build Relationships

As you begin your first year, building relationships with grade-level buddies and others at your school site is critical to your success. Don't be afraid to reach out and let them know that you are eager to get to know them. You want to seek out your administrators also and begin to build a good relationship. Encourage them to get to know you, too! This also includes the most important relationship: the one with your students and their families. You are central to their lives now, and your actions will play a big role in all they do this year -- you can count on that! Read this article and begin thinking about how you will build trusting relationships with your school community.

4. Communicate

How you begin to communicate with your student's and families, is truly a reflection of your commitment to them as their teacher. Communication now and throughout the school year is so important. It's vital and essential that it's on-going and creates an environment of collaboration -- with parents as your partners in this journey. Take a look at teacher Pernille Ripp's example of first-time communication with students' parents and get a feel for how you might get started.

5. Collaborate

When I was a new teacher, I sadly taught in isolation. Experienced teachers were unwilling to share resources or lesson plans with me. They held those very close, almost like a mom holds their infant child. It was a tough time for me and I had to rely on my own skills and talents to get me through those early years. This lack of sharing and collaboration meant that every time I wanted to launch a project, I was on my own to make it happen. It doesn't need to be that way! Open yourself up -- share and collaborate with your grade-level team and/or college classmates. Share resources, join planning teams, be a part of the conversation! You will find that the road to developing lessons and projects will be so much more meaningful to you because you did it with a collaborative spirit! And check out the Collaborators Wanted Group here on Edutopia.org to get some inspiration.

6. Get a Mentor

I believe strongly in the power of mentoring. I believe that this relationship is vital to the success of a new teacher. However, not all experienced teachers at a school site are able to take on this challenge. A year ago I had the idea, that if there weren't enough experienced teachers at a school site who could, or were willing to mentor a new teacher, why not a virtual mentor who would be willing to lend support? The Teacher Mentoring Project was born! I urge you to seek out this group on the EduPLN.com community. Many amazing educators from around the globe are available to support and mentor you through the first years of your practice and beyond!

7. Ask for Help

I spent over ten years as a site principal. One thing I noticed most of all, as I worked with my new teachers, was that they failed to ask for help. They didn't ask for help from me, their mentors, or even their own colleagues! Then when the big concerns arose, as they almost always did, they spent all this time apologizing for why they weren't successful. Don't make this same mistake. Ask for help! It's okay and shouldn't be seen as a sign of weakness. On the contrary, most will see it as a strength. Isn't this what we expect from our students? Don't we tell them to ask for help if they are struggling with a concept? So why wouldn't you?

8. Be Willing to Grow

You know it all... right? Are you sure? It has been my experience that some new teachers are offended when their mentor or admin asks them to make some adjustments, or dare I say it, improvements. Don't let that be you. Don't let your ego get in the way of an opportunity to grow or move in a better direction. As the year develops, if you have a good admin, you will have an opportunity to be observed. Again, if you have a good admin they will comment on your lessons and offer some ideas on areas for growth. Be gracious and accept them. Ask questions about what they observed. Ask what they offer as a proactive solution, and how they will be supporting you. Then take some time for personal reflection. Read the post by Edna Sackson. It's a great start...

9. Blog for Yourself

I know... I've heard it all from many new teachers: "It's too hard. I'm too tired. I just don't have anything to say." I hope you will consider leaving those excuses behind. Many new teachers are blogging and I can't say enough about the power of blogging in your life as a new teacher. It will help you reflect, get feedback, and collaborate. I, myself, was a novice blogger two years ago. I'm happy to share that I feel like my blogging experience will always be a journey of discovery -- and I kinda like that. In any case, take a look at my blog, and the "Blogs I Follow" on my home page, to get a feel for what others are doing with blogs. There are some awesome blogging platforms available on the web. Pick one that speaks to you and then... jump in! Let me know when you've finally got it up and running!

10. Blog with Your Students

As soon as you have jumped in and started to blog, get your students doing it too! I know there might be confidentiality issues that may persist at your school sight, but if you are able to, this is a must-do. The insight you'll gain about your students' lives will be priceless. Many teachers have their students blogging worldwide. I'm happy to connect you to them so you can ask questions and collaborate. Give it some thought...

11. Make Time for R & R

If you don't take time for rest and relaxation you will crash and burn! This is the truth -- no doubt about it. What commitment have you made to yourself to ensure that you do this -- and get some exercise, too? Joan Young started a blog fueled by this idea: "The goal is for us to help keep ourselves motivated and dedicated to living our healthiest, best lives." Check out this blog for ideas on how to be sure you make the time to refuel yourself -- and not just with coffee!

12. Start a Wiki

A wiki is a website that lets any visitor become a participant. You can create or edit the actual site contents without any special technical knowledge or tools. A wiki is continuously being transformed and is a living collaboration. I encourage you to take the time to create a wiki for your classroom. It can hold all kinds of great content that you can share with your students and their parents -- the power of wikis is amazing! Check out this site for ideas on how to get started.

13. Use Skype

Most of us know how to use Skype to chat with friends or colleagues, but did you know that you can use it to connect with educators (some who are also new teachers) around the globe? Be sure to check out Skype in the Classroom for awesome ideas, projects, and collaborations!

14. Join Twitter

Twitter is an online social networking and micro-blogging service that enables its users to send and read text-based posts of up to 140 characters, informally known as "tweets." Twitter is an amazing social media tool for educators and can be a huge source of support for new teachers. If you aren't yet on Twitter, check out Steven Anderson's Live Binder on Twitter for Educators. It's not to be missed. If you are on Twitter... Bravo! Now pass this link to a friend who's still on the fence.

15. Participate in Twitter Chats

Twitter chats are the next best thing to sharing a coffee with a buddy at a local Starbucks. New teachers can find many wonderful support systems in chats. I want to take this time to invite you to join our New Teacher Chat on Twitter (Wednesdays, 8pm ET, #ntchat). It's small, practitioner focused, and supportive. If you are new to chats, it's really the best place to start. I hope you will join us!

16. Join a Community

As a new teacher, you may at times feel isolated. The power of an online community is that you can probably find someone else who'd like some company. Kidding aside, more than that, it's a way to be a part of something bigger than yourself! You can also freely contribute, share a blog post, or ask a question. Consider joining our New Teacher Connections Group here on Edutopia, for starters. You can also find other great communities such as Ning, which will offer amazing opportunities to connect to resources you may have never known existed! Seek out relevant content specific communities for deeper learning.

17. Start a YouTube Channel

The YouTube channel in the link above was created for new teachers, by me. It's a collaborative with several educators in Canada. The purpose is to provide year-long feedback to new teachers on how to get through the first year of teaching. Think about how you could use your own YouTube channel with your students, parents, and colleagues. It's fun, and easy to do. Give it a try.

18. Participate in Free Online Professional Development

As a new teacher, it's vital that you carve out some time to attend professional development conferences. And these days, it's no longer necessary to spend tons of hard-earned resources to participate. You can attend amazing free professional development opportunities online -- and often times in your jammies! Take a moment to explore an example of what an online conference looks like. And research other opportunities on your own. Let us know what you think about the idea of free online webinars!

19. Journal About Your Experience

When you look back on the journey of this first year, you will be amazed at your experiences! I really hope that you will capture them in a journal, a blog, or with an online diary. I'm a big fan of journal writing, and over the years have captured some amazing memories that would have otherwise been lost. The ability of a journal to allow for personal reflections is truly amazing. In the process of your own journal writing you will think of great ideas of how to do this with your students. For a quick, easy way to journal, check out Penzu. It's really cool -- and it's free!

20. Don't Be Afraid to Fail

"And why do we fall, Bruce? So we can learn to pick ourselves up." ~Thomas Wayne from Batman Begins (2005)

What a great movie quote, don't you think? It speaks to the fact that we are going to fail. No doubt about that. It happens to all of us. But what we do about it, regardless of what "it" is, is truly what's the most important. The sooner you learn that it's okay to fail, the more enriching your experience as a teacher will be. You will embrace your failures as opportunities for new beginnings.

I'm fortunate to be a part of The 30 Goals Challenge. For this challenge I created 30 blog posts on various subjects that speak to the heart of what it means to be an educator. As I close this "20 Tidbits for New Teachers" post, I leave you with the message of goal #13: Learn from your mistakes.

Let me know what you think. All the best to you on your journey!

There are so many more awesome "tidbits" that can be shared with new teachers. What would be one of yours?

 


Via Giri Kumar, Philippe Trebaul
Pamela Perry King's insight:

Stay connected!

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The 13 MUST Know Professional Development Websites for Teachers

The 13 MUST Know Professional Development Websites for Teachers | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it

Professional Development is a life-long learning process that involves different activities including individual progress, continuing education, inservice education, peer collaboration, study groups, and peer coaching or mentoring. The importance of professional development lays in the fact that it is closely related to the overall quality of education and students achievements. Teachers who stop learning and suffice themselves with the curriculum content soon turn into hard working students only a step above their actual students.


Via Steven Engravalle
Pamela Perry King's insight:

Great sites!

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How to Think Critically and Learn Anything - YouTube

I first started writing this as a much-needed lesson plan for my niece and nephew (who are about to enter their high school years) and then figured I'd turn ...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Pamela Perry King's insight:

Great video, excellent description!

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Teaching Metacognition: How Students Think Is Key To High Achievement

Teaching Metacognition: How Students Think Is Key To High Achievement | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it

"A few years ago, I came across some interesting research by cognitive psychologist Ronald T. Kellogg. He claimed that the mark of an expert writer is not years of practice or a hefty vocabulary, but rather an awareness of one’s audience. This made sense to me, and I wondered if it were true in other disciplines as well."


Via Beth Dichter
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Joy Power's curator insight, October 9, 2014 9:21 AM

Important research on learning for achievement.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, October 9, 2014 3:53 PM

Teaching Metacognition: How Students Think Is Key To High Achievement

Becky Roehrs's curator insight, October 13, 2014 9:51 PM

Research about how self-awareness can help you tap your learning potential

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How Educators Can Assist Learners in Developing a Growth Mindset

How Educators Can Assist Learners in Developing a Growth Mindset | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it

Coaches operate with an underlying assumption that giving advice to others undermines the confidence and self-worth of others.  Others don’t need to be fixed.  In teaching we need to move to exactly this stance in order to foster creativity in our students–to allow our students the choice, control, novelty and challenge that builds their creativity. 

 

Without the assumption that our students are already competent, imaginative, and ready to burst forth with regular exhibitions of novel and valuable ideas and products, we are limiting their creative capacities before they’ve even had a chance to discover them.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=MindShift...

 

 

 


Via Gust MEES
Pamela Perry King's insight:

Growth is the key to success!

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Allan Shaw's curator insight, September 29, 2014 7:26 PM

It remains easy to slip back into the mindset, perhaps habitual, that knowledge is something to be transmitted by the teacher and the student is an empty vessel to be filled. While there is some truth in this stereotype, research on neuro-plasticity, understandings about how learning occurs, and about interpersonal skills suggest clearly that a growth mindset model is more useful for teaching and learning  with children and young adults.

Sandra Oeding-Erdel's curator insight, September 29, 2014 10:11 PM

Mindset and reflection 

Growing Up Greatness's curator insight, October 5, 2014 3:23 AM

So important to have an expectation that all students have the capacity to learn and contribute to learning.

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The Shift of the Role of the Teacher

The Shift of the Role of the Teacher | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it

We know today’s students will have to create their jobs, not look for jobs. They will compete with others around the globe. They will have jobs replaced by outsourcing and technology if their skills are easily replicated or duplicated.  To succeed, students will need creativity, communication, critical thinking, collaboration, and entrepreneurship.

 

They will need to be able to adapt to change, be resilient and able to work effectively in a variety of environments.

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/05/25/so-whats-the-change-for-teachers-in-21st-century-education/

 

 


Via Gust MEES
Pamela Perry King's insight:

What's the change: Excellent Tips!

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Alfredo Corell's curator insight, September 28, 2014 8:54 AM

From the plain lecturing to the complex Coaching skills

In which step do you think are your teaching scenario?

nihal abitiu's curator insight, September 29, 2014 4:32 AM

The  role of the Teacher

Ness Crouch's curator insight, April 28, 9:53 PM

There are huge shifts in the role of the teacher these days! A very worthwhile read and great graphic

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Great Critical Thinking Map for your Classroom

Great Critical Thinking Map for your Classroom | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Pamela Perry King's insight:

Seems to follow the Effective School Correlates.

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Javier Castro's curator insight, September 24, 2014 8:42 AM

agregar su visión ...

Cynthia Day's curator insight, September 25, 2014 11:07 AM

Making up my mind

Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, September 25, 2014 6:10 PM

A good one to display for a visual reminder.

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5 Ways to Help Your Students Become Better Questioners

5 Ways to Help Your Students Become Better Questioners | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it
Asking a question can be a scary step into the void. How do you create a culture of using questioning in the classroom?

Via Gust MEES
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ManufacturingStories's curator insight, September 17, 2014 1:56 PM

add your insight...


K'Ailene M. McGlothen's curator insight, September 17, 2014 2:24 PM

This article identifies strategies to utilize 21st century learning with K-12 teaching practices.

David Baker's curator insight, September 18, 2014 12:19 PM

Providing  a classroom culture framework can help me as a teacher and my students to have a culture of practice around questioning. 

 

Making questioning fun and then making sure it sticks are reminders for me and my practice.

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3 Ways a Leader’s Attitude Impacts the Team | Success | Character | Empathy

3 Ways a Leader’s Attitude Impacts the Team | Success | Character | Empathy | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it
Everyone struggles with keeping their attitude positive, even people in leadership roles. The pressure of leadership, personal issues, and life in general will impact your mood, energy and attitude. And, attitude matters more than you probably realize. When left unchecked your attitude can damage your team.

Without saying a word your attitude permeates from your skin. Even when you think you are hiding it and that no one sees they often do. Here are 3 ways a leader’s attitude impacts the team.

Your attitude sets their attitude

Attitude is contagious especially when you are in a leadership role. Positive or negative your team will soon adopt your attitude. Over time, your attitude sets the tone for the employees and also indicates what is and is not acceptable.

Even when you don’t want your attitude to impact the organization it will.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Success



Via Anne Leong, Richard Andrews, Ines Bieler, Gust MEES
Pamela Perry King's insight:

Attitude is like a cold....cough on someone and spread the joy!

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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 3, 6:16 PM
Everyone struggles with keeping their attitude positive, even people in leadership roles. The pressure of leadership, personal issues, and life in general will impact your mood, energy and attitude. And, attitude matters more than you probably realize. When left unchecked your attitude can damage your team.

Without saying a word your attitude permeates from your skin. Even when you think you are hiding it and that no one sees they often do. Here are 3 ways a leader’s attitude impacts the team.

Your attitude sets their attitude

Attitude is contagious especially when you are in a leadership role. Positive or negative your team will soon adopt your attitude. Over time, your attitude sets the tone for the employees and also indicates what is and is not acceptable.

Even when you don’t want your attitude to impact the organization it will.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Success


Dr. Deborah Brennan's curator insight, June 4, 10:39 AM

Leaders have to be self aware.  What they say, do, even think effects the whole school!

Dr. Deborah Brennan's curator insight, June 10, 5:30 PM

Attitude matters!  A teacher's attitude affects the students - a leader's attitude sets the tone for the entire building.  Someone once said, "the principal should be the happiest person in the building" (it is the principal, more than others, who controls so much of what goes on). 

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The Science: The Growth Mindset - Mindset Works®: Student Motivation through a Growth Mindset, by Carol Dweck, Ph.D.

The Science: The Growth Mindset - Mindset Works®: Student Motivation through a Growth Mindset, by Carol Dweck, Ph.D. | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it
Research shows that Intelligence is Malleable
It’s also important to know that the growth mindset has been receiving scientific confirmation from cognitive psychology and from neuroscience. For example, neuroscientists tracked students during their teenage years. For many students, they found substantial changes in performance on verbal and non-verbal IQ tests. Using neuroimaging, they found corresponding changes in the density of neurons in the relevant brain areas for these students. In other words, an increase in neuronal connections in the brain accompanied an increase in IQ-test performance, while a decrease in neuronal connections in the brain accompanied a decrease in IQ-test performance.

Via Jay Cross
Pamela Perry King's insight:

Having a growth mindset in a fixed mindset work environment is a challenge. 

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Jay Cross's curator insight, April 11, 1:25 PM

New target for learning: boost intelligence. Get a Growth Mindset!

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Used Effectively or Simply Used? - Langwitches

Used Effectively or Simply Used? - Langwitches | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it

"Beth Holland shared her presentation “Used Effectively or Simply Used” from the ASCD conference 2015 as a slide deck via Twitter.

The message from her slides caught my attention… I kept thinking about the questions Beth proposes we ask when we walk into a classroom: 


* Are students engaged?
* Are students creating artifacts as evidence of their own understanding?
* Are students constructing their own knowledge?
* Are students sharing their learning?
* Are student reflecting on their learning?"


Via John Evans
Pamela Perry King's insight:

Very effective!

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7 Online Tools for Creating Charts & Diagrams

7 Online Tools for Creating Charts & Diagrams | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it

"Through the Free Technology for Teachers Facebook page I recently received a request for some suggested online chart creation tools..."


Via Baiba Svenca
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Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, February 13, 11:11 AM

Apps for Google doc integration and creation of charts.

Locke Chastaine's curator insight, February 13, 3:08 PM

I always struggle with graphics. 

Saberes Sin Fronteras OVS's curator insight, February 15, 10:10 AM

#tecnicas

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Professional Learning Communities

Professional Learning Communities | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it
Overview

For education to evolve in the 21st Century, it will take teachers and administrators working alongside one another in true collaboration. This is why Professional Learning Communities, or PLCs, have become so crucial in designing systematic, school-wide strategies dedicated to helping students achieve their potential. 

A PLC is a group of educators who work collaboratively to ensure the academic success of students, then reverse engineer a way for that success to be achieved. It’s about seeking and sharing learning rather than merely teaching. Teachers and staff assess school practices that have proved to be successful in boosting student learning, and then apply those practices in the classroom, and—perhaps most importantly—hold themselves accountable for results. 

The resources included in this toolkit are intended to help you and your team meet the challenges presented by today’s educational landscape and—in the process—elevate learning not only for your students, but for yourselves. 
TitleDescriptionFile PLC Advocates and Studies

Expert endorsements and academic studies that support Professional Learning Communities in schools.

 PLC Advocates and Studies.pdf PLC Peer Observation

Structured peer observations help teachers improve learning for all students.

 PLC Peer Observation.pdf How Professional Learning Communities Impact Student Success

A Professional Learning Community gets teachers working together as members of high-performing, collaborative teams focused on the improvement of student learning.

 How Professional Learning Communities Impact Student Success.pdf The Changing Role of Teachers

New tasks and challenges call for developing new abilities and setting aside old habits.

 Changing Roles with PLCs.pdf Components of a Successful PLC

A comprehensive checklist that details what all thriving Professional Learning Communities have in common.

 Components of a Successful PLC.pdf Building Leadership

Collaboration is an effective strategy for improving student learning. The role of the principal is critical in creating a collaborative environment, as all change flows through the principal‘s office.

 Building Leadership.pdf PLC Teams

A PLC initiative might meet with resistance. So why not simply utilize existing team structures and focus on what effec­tive teams do to help all kids learn?

 Teams.pdf What is a Professional Learning Community?

It’s a focus on learning rather than teaching, with teachers working collaboratively and holding themselves accountable for the results. Learn more.

 What is a Professional Learning Community?.pdf Mentoring and PLCs

Mentoring isn’t just for students anymore. Professional Learning Communities can act as dynamic support systems for teachers.

 Mentoring.pdf The School District as a PLC

The PLC concept can extend beyond teachers and schools when district leaders become emphatic about district-wide learning goals.

 School District as a PLC.pdf Strategies for Principals to Implement Effective Professional Learning Communities

A checklist for principals in creating a culture of continuous learning for their schools.

 Strategies for Principals to Implement Effective Professional Learning Communities.pdf Developing a Professional Learning Community

How does a principal convince a staff that implementing a Professional Learning Community is worthy of their time and effort? Find out how.

 Developing a Professional Learning Community.pdf 

Download the Entire Toolkit


Via Dr. Gordon Dahlby, Vladimir Kukharenko
Pamela Perry King's insight:

PLC's the future.

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Dr. Gordon Dahlby's curator insight, February 19, 2014 2:16 PM

How are you integrating this into your school's Professional Learning Plan?

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Adding a Little Spice to Classrooms

Adding a Little Spice to Classrooms | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it

 If you’re mentoring new teachers and observe that their classes lack interacting or engaging activities, here are some suggestions that I have found easy to implement and wildly successful. Many new teachers erroneously believe that elementary, middle school and even high school students learn in the same manner as adults.  They don’t. These ideas might help them develop other ways of reaching young learners.  None of the ideas in this blog are my creations.  They’re ideas I learned from workshops, books, and other colleagues, but they are ideas that I have tried in my classroom and found effective.


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5 Questions Great Leaders Ask of New Hires in The First Month

5 Questions Great Leaders Ask of New Hires in The First Month | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it

There are a few questions only the best leaders ask of new recruits to drive performance. 


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donhornsby's curator insight, December 2, 2014 10:27 AM

This is a helpful article for anyone who is responsible for a team.

 

(From the article): What one other thing could I have done this month to help you settle in?


This is a question that is very rarely asked. I admit it, most of the time I miss this too. Yet it’s surprising, because as leaders we all have a responsibility to help new recruits get settled.

 

Often the typical question of ‘what would you have changed about your work’ comes at the exit interview, but by then its way too late for any change.

 

This question has several powerful purposes for both the leader and the recruit.

 

First, it tells the recruit that the leader is open to feedback. What better time to encourage this type of conversation than during the first month of work. Second, it helps the leader spot opportunities to help the recruit further settle in. And finally, it helps the leader fine tune their approach to inducting new people, so for the next person they hire, they can adjust their process for maximum affect

 

 

Dawn Matheson's curator insight, December 3, 2014 9:35 AM

These questions (with a little tweak) are good for parents too - particularly in those "transition" years, like elementary to middle school, middle to high school, moving out on their own ... you get the idea

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Digital Storytelling Evaluation Rubrics for Teachers

Digital Storytelling Evaluation Rubrics for Teachers | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it

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Judith Morais's curator insight, January 24, 2014 8:06 PM

While I never use rubrics found online wholesale, they certainly give good ideas for creating units and our own rubrics.

Kerri Schaub's curator insight, February 2, 2014 7:54 AM

Useful!

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, October 10, 2014 5:20 PM

For more resources on STEM Education visit http://bit.ly/1640Tbl

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Free Technology for Teachers: How to Use Classtools.net to Create a Fake Text Message Exchange

Free Technology for Teachers: How to Use Classtools.net to Create a Fake Text Message Exchange | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it

Via Luísa Lima, Juergen Wagner
Pamela Perry King's insight:

great lesson for digital citizenship!

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Cyber-Security Practice: Learn it in one week

Cyber-Security Practice: Learn it in one week | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it
. . Read, think, learn and share over Social Media… Security is everyone's responsibility! We are ALL responsible for the Internet's future! . ===> "Nothing in life is to be feared. It is only t...

 


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Digital Citizenship: Everyone is important  in keeping your own security.

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majorlever's comment, May 1, 11:43 PM
Good one
firesolid's curator insight, May 2, 1:41 AM

Its fantastic

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Designing curriculum that teachers will actually use

Designing curriculum that teachers will actually use | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it

What is leadership in curriculum?

Whatever the answer, the question should not be confused with a related but far different query: What is management in curriculum? Yet, I suspect that few people with curricular responsibilities appreciate how different the questions and answers are – and why real leadership is rare yet sorely needed now.


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30+ Features of The 21st Century Classroom

30+ Features of The 21st Century Classroom | SoHoInt  Critical Creative Thinker 046 | Scoop.it
September 14, 2014
Now that the new school year started and that students are back to their 'formal' learning mode and everything seems to be unfolding as planned, it is time to pause and think...

Via Yashy Tohsaku, Juergen Wagner
Pamela Perry King's insight:

Follows Effective Schools very well!

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