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Misadventures in Spelling

Misadventures in Spelling | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it

"Dyslexia forced me to develop powers of concentration that have been invaluable throughout my career in business, philanthropy, and public life."

Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

Children's book and young adult author Kate Scott reflects on her dyslexia and Nelson Rockefeller's letter to dyslexic children in her blog. Pretty cool that she's able to write about a dyslexic teen who is read this letter. 


"In the novel, she is read an excerpt of this same letter that inspired me so much as a child."


Read more. 

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Lou Salza's curator insight, March 15, 2013 2:46 PM


Excerpt from a letter written by Nelson Rockerfeller:


" ....Looking back over the years, I remember vividly the pain and mortification I felt as a boy of 8, when I was assigned to read a short passage of Scripture at a community vesper service during summer vacation in Main—and did a thoroughly miserable job of it.

I know what a dyslexic child goes through—the frustration of not being able to do what other children co easily, the humiliation of being thought not too bright when such is not the case at all.
My personal discoveries as to what is required to cope with dyslexia could be summarized in these admonitions to the individual dyslexic:
- Accept the fact that you have a problem—don’t just try to hide it.
- Refuse to feel sorry for yourself.
- Realize that you don’t have an excuse—you have a challenge.
- Face the challenge.
- Work harder and learn mental discipline—the capacity for total concentration—and
- Never Quit...."

Cathy Booth's curator insight, March 20, 2013 5:15 AM

I like this blog and this article quoting Rockefeller's letter is really goood.

 

Dyslexic Advantage Blog
Dyslexia, creativity, and MIND thinking advantages
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Dyslexic Advantage - Dr Dave McComas - Space Physicist and NASA IBEX Director - YouTube

Dr Dave McComas shares his dyslexia story "A Personal Journey from 'Slow' to the Interstellar Frontier". Dave is the principal investigator for the IBEX (Int...
Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

Dave McComas is a NASA space pioneer who was thought to be 'slow' because of his difficulty reading. He made jewelry in high school but his fine motor ability, entrepreneurial ability, and ability to think out of the box - all helped him send rockets to the farthest reaches of the solar system. 

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Dyslexic National Geographic Photographer and Filmmaker Michael Shainblum

Dyslexic National Geographic Photographer and Filmmaker Michael Shainblum | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it
Michael Shainblum grew up thinking he wasn't good at anything—until he discovered his knack for beautiful photography.
Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

"As a kid, a lot of people would succeed in certain ways that I couldn't. It took me a really long time to learn how to read and write. As a kid, school takes up a good portion of your life. And I wasn't very good at most academics or sports or athletics. So I was stuck trying to find something that I could be good at or be proud of.


That's where art came in. I was always interested in art. That's always been something that's been with me, and it's grown over time. It was the thing that allowed me to escape, to stop thinking that I'm bad at everything and realize that as a human, I had something to offer.


I get a lot of other emails from other dyslexic artists who say they had the same [experience]. A few of [the letter writers] are parents, too: "Our son was the same way, but we see the potential and talent..."

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Dyslexic Illustrator Wendell Minor Honored at MA Norman Rockwell Museum

Dyslexic Illustrator Wendell Minor Honored at MA Norman Rockwell Museum | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it

"Wendell Minor “read” books by interpreting the art and learned to love literature through his sixth-grade teacher, a giant of a man with a resonant voice who delighted in reading aloud stories...“For the first time, I was hearing words come to life. Mr. Gilkey’s voice lifted them off the page, creating wonderful pictures in my imagination. … Words paint pictures in the mind and I wanted someday to bring those pictures alive in paint."

Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

Wendell worked in a meat packing company in order to earn enough money to attend a then-unaccredited art school. In a leap of faith, he sold his VW beetle and moved to NY to look for a job as an artist. The leap paid off.  His first job was a book cover - he was told to read a manuscript and have a picture by the end of the day.


"Mr. Minor finds it ironic that a dyslexic should end up in the publishing business, but his reading disability has not curtailed his career. He brings deep research and insight to each of his projects. “Each cover assignment took me on a journey of discovery that required research and careful consideration of the text to create the visual essence of the book …, “ he wrote. “Each was a challenge and each one taught me something new.”


Read more: http://www.countytimes.com/articles/2013/12/08/l_c_t_monthly/doc52a0f8f20a40d577644117.txt


Also watch a photo montage of Wendell's American illustrations here

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Jony Ive - Dyslexic Genius Behind Apple Design

Jony Ive - Dyslexic Genius Behind Apple Design | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it

In a new book about the Jony Ive ("the genius behind Apple's greatest products"), the author talks about his dyslexia.

Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

From NYT interview with the Ives' biographer:  "one of the most insightful things, one of the things that I found most fascinating, was that Jony Ive is dyslexic. But one thing I noticed, that no one has ever made clear, is that he’s always been very tactile. He loves to touch things. One of his first products, when he was a student working as an intern for a design company, was a pen that you could fiddle with, and they had what they called it “the fiddle factor.” He knew people fiddle with pens." 


We also liked this: 

"He was a design prodigy. He’s been obsessed with design since he was a kid. His dad — people say that he is a silversmith. But he was actually a designer — he was an education reformer. He specialized in design education in the U.K.


So he and his son were a couple of design nuts. They used to walk around looking at everything in the street, talking about the lampposts and why they were designed the way they were, and would they work in the rain or in the fog..."



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Supporting STEM Students with Dyslexia

Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

Great dyslexia practice guide for faculty and staff in STEM (Science-Technology-Engineering-Mathematics) disciplines from the Institute of Physics.

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Malcolm Gladwell's 'David and Goliath' talks Dyslexia and its Advantages

Malcolm Gladwell's 'David and Goliath' talks Dyslexia and its Advantages | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it
Author Malcolm Gladwell's latest book, "David and Goliath," explains why underdogs can win -- if they realize they're not really underdogs.
Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

Listen to Malcolm Gladwell on David Boies' dyslexia and his latest book David and Goliath  http://bit.ly/1chiSQy


Excerpt: "Why do we return again and again to the subject of seemingly lopsided conflicts? So one, I wanted to explain that obsession. And two, I thought the ways in which we misread these conflicts are symptomatic of something deeper, which is I don't think that we have a good sense of what an advantage really is. Or a disadvantage. We have those categories mixed up, and I wanted to kind of sort through them and say, 'Things that we have thought were real advantages actually aren't, and things that we think of as overwhelming obstacles actually are incredibly useful.'"


On the success of David Boies, a trial lawyer diagnosed with dyslexia:

"Here we have one of the greatest lawyers in the country, and he is profoundly dyslexic. He reads basically one book a year. He finds reading difficult and painful. Think about that for a moment, he's a lawyer! He's in a profession that has reading at its absolute core. When I talked to him, I said, 'How did you become such a successful lawyer in spite of this disability?' And he said, 'not in spite, I became a successful lawyer because of this so-called disability.' And he explained to me how he spent his life compensating for this."


"He learned how to listen, and he also developed an extraordinary memory. So he would sit in school, and he didn't take notes, he sat and listened to the teacher and remembered everything that was said. Those two skills turned out to be far more useful than you'd think in getting through school, but more importantly, when he becomes a trial lawyer, what's being a great trial lawyer all about? It's about listening very closely to what the person you're cross-examining is saying and being able to summon that in the moment. So he's famous for confronting the witness and saying, 'Three days ago, you said the following thing.' He'd been working on those skills his entire life." "

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Dyslexia Today's curator insight, October 13, 2013 7:04 PM

Looks like a good read!!

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Ennis' Gift

Ennis William Cosby was dyslexic. As a boy, he struggled to learn in school. And he didn't know why. Eventually, Ennis came to understand that he simply lear...
Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

Watch it! This is a beautiful movie about dyslexia, learning differences, and dyslexic advantages that Ennis Cosby had - like having a heart for helping other people and being a sensitive and perceptive teacher. 

 

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Dyslexic Inventor of Ebooks and Project Gutenberg - Michael Hart

Dyslexic Inventor of Ebooks and Project Gutenberg - Michael Hart | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it

"Dyslexic but precocious, Hart was messing with algorithms while other kids were fumbling with Lego. He plowed through the U of I in two years, graduating first in his class with a self-created major in man-machine interfaces..." - 

Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

"I have the kind of self-confidence that allows me to release all sorts of mistakes to the outside world. . .I am dyslexic, but if you think I am going to run this through a spellchecker, sorry. . .I would rather work more with that time and energy on the books. . .that's my REAL goal. . ." - Michael Hart, dyslexic, inventor of Ebooks and Project Gutenberg


Hart's parents were both government codebreakers in WWII. Dad was a professor of Shakespeare and CPA, while mom was a math and education professor who also ran a women's clothing store. He saw himself as a an electronic Johnny Appleseed by sowing the Internet with books that were available past copyright. 


Great quotes from Michael Hart:


"Reasonable people adapt themselves to the world. Unreasonable people attempt to adapt the world to themselves. All progress, therefore, depends on unreasonable people."


Michael Hart and Project Gutenberg at Wired


Other references: Slashdot, Michael Hart on Wikipedia, Project Gutenberg

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What It's Like to be Dyslexic - Harvard Grad '13

What It's Like to be Dyslexic - Harvard Grad '13 | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it

"If my AP psychology teacher did not lecture on dyslexia but instead made us learn solely from our text, I probably would have never figured out I was dyslexic since I would have missed the book's main points given my difficulty reading. But since 40 million American Adults are dyslexic, but only 2 million people know it..."

Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

"I always ask people how to spell words, and often people respond by sounding the word out for me like k-aa-t.  I never understood why that made sense, but I would just pretend like it helped.  Why couldn't they just say, " C, A, T"...When I read books and I had no clue how to pronounce the name of the characters I simply made up new names.  When people heard I read a book, they would talk to me about the characters and I would have no clue who they were talking about."


A lot of people would find it unbelievable that a student who could graduate from Harvard would not what it meant to sound out the letters in 'cat', but that's a huge part of dyslexia not being recognized. The combination of high intellectual abiity with unexplained difficulties  sounding out words and reading is the classic presentation of dyslexia. 


We're hoping to get a chance to talk to Hena and invite her to give a webinar. Check out her wonderful post here: http://www.limeconnect.com/blog/detail/spotlight-on-our-network-what-its-like-to-be-dyslexic  


The more dyslexic people speak out about what it's like - the better for everyone.



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John Rodrigues High School Dropout to Harvard

John Rodrigues High School Dropout to Harvard | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it

Thank You John Rodrigues!

High School Dropout to Harvard Book Give-Away



Author John Rodrigues has generously offered to give away free copies of his book (paperback and ebook) to members of our Dyslexic Advantage community. He's also kindly offered to hold a Question & Answer webinar in our new webroom at Dyslexic Advantage. Look for sign-ups in July.

Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

"I had a very rough time in my early schooling and I want to help other dyslexics not have to go through the same thing that I did." - author and teacher John Rodrigues

John is also happy to write an inscription in the book to whomever you choose. 


For additional books, John's book can be purchased here.


Sign-Up and request a personalized dedication here: http://www.formstack.com/forms/?1510253-4sGtFozk5x

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Happy Mother's Day - Mom is Wow

Happy Mother's Day - Mom is Wow | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it

Happy Mother's Day to all those incredible Mom's out there.

"My mum has helped so much to understand me and what is different about me to anyone else." - son with dyslexia nominating his mom Joanne Cooke for Parent of the Year Award

Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

Here the sons, daughters, and moms speak for themselves:

 

"So my mother created the 'exceptions': 'mental health days' Anytime I had a spelling test or I didn't want to go to school...Mental health days were one of the few bright spots in my life." - Jonathan Mooney, Learning Outside the Lines

 

"I firmly believe my mother’s ideals and education have inspired me and my siblings to believe that we can all make a difference, and have something special to give." - Susan Hampshire, actress with dyslexia

 

"I’m dyslexic and when I was six my parents realized I couldn’t read and had been fooling everyone. The only way my mum could get me to work at my reading was if she promised to get me an agent. She said to me, ‘If you come to me with a book in your hand and a smile on your face every single day during the summer holidays, then at the end of it I will get you an agent." - Keira Knightley, actress with dyslexia


" During all this time, he cherished our read-aloud time. He has an intense love of books and good literature, and once he realized that he could someday read his books to himself, he was ecstatic. A great burden had been lifted from his young shoulders..." - homeschooling mom Maureen Wittman

 

"To remediate his dyslexia, I have used private tutors..I have received 170 hours of coursework toward becoming an academic language therapist....I find I am not at all atypical in my quest to further my own educatino to help my son...." - Mary Natwick

 

"...no one ever talked about dyslexia. In those days were were just classed as 'thick'. But eventually my mother realized what was happening and taught me herself." - Natasha Cooper, author Trish Maguire series

 

"Well, my mother tutored me in reading. When I think of my mother, every night, making me read, it was like hell. I found it very uncomfortable having to sit there for a half-hour or 20 minutes. Maybe it was five minutes, I don't know, but it seemed like hours. But when you're being made to learn to read where you're stumbling along - they were very concerned about my poor performance in school. And I think during my high school years, to go from grammar school into high school, my mother, truth be told, did most of my homework. [Laughs.]...My mother would say Paul is good with his hands and he makes things." - glass artist Paul Stankard

 

"My mother taught me to love my work. I learned everything about business from her. I watched her work. She enabled me to work." - David Geffen, Dreamworks

 

"I fax papers home to my mom to have her read them to me." - Ben Foss, JD MBA, Intel reader

 


"His mother had read everything to him and in medical school his wife was reading aloud all books and references...there was some opposition to his continuance in medical school on the part of the dean and one other faculty member, but the opposition subsided...After his graduation a report came from a distance medical school hospital stating that this man was the best intern they had had for some time. He passed his American boards in internal medicine and became the head of a group practice clinic in a large city..." - Lloyd Thompson, Reading Disability

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Dyslexic Artist Colin Poole - Dyslexic Advantage

Dyslexic Artist Colin Poole - Dyslexic Advantage | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it
From: Flourishing with Dyslexia (http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_7694/is_200807/ai_n32301838/)

Excerpt: How I create, think, process information,...
Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

"When I was in school I wondered why I didn't understand; now I wonder why "they" don't understand. My life and my viewpoint are distinct, and I love it this way. Dyslexies are often the inventors, the artists, and the creators. We are the different people who make a difference."


And: "How I create, think, process information, and view the world around me are all tied in. Thanks to ADD, multitasking comes naturally. I listen to books on tape while I work (over 3,500 so far) and can comfortably toss in other activities without even realizing it. Sifting and condensing information is part of understanding it, so I can explain the theory of relativity in a sentence or express the essentials of form and imagery. My focus, both consciously and unconsciously on the visual and tactile world, has become another priceless ingredient in my artwork. I think effectively in 3D which comes in handy when I am reconfiguring a Corvette suspension system or troubleshooting a glass manufacturing production line. This is also an invaluable tool in the creation of my sculptures, some of which are fully formed in my mind before they become reality. The 3D viewpoint also plays a strong role in my paintings.


Read more.

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Blake Charlton Fantasy Author and Physician

Blake Charlton Fantasy Author and Physician | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it

"Dyslexia has had a defining role in my life and career. As a teenager and as a young adult, I fought against it, trying to escape it...These days I see the idiosyncracies of my mind if not as a gift, then as a purpose - one that has led me to my two great passions, medicine and literature." - author and physician Blake Charlton

Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

"...At twelve years old, I still couldn’t read a book by myself. To encourage a love of literature, my parents read to me every night. It wasn’t working. I preferred the football field or basketball court where my disability didn’t show.


But then my parents began reading fantasy: Terry Brooks, Raymond Feist, Tad Williams, Robin Hobb, and Robert Jordan. Both being psychiatrists, mom and dad noticed my interest and read to me less and less each night. They faked exhaustion or sore throats or tired eyes, but they always left the book. I became obsessed with fantasy..."


Read more From Special Ed to Stanford Med and Blake Charlton, Author


Blake's coming to our conference in April!

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Video games that hold the attention proposed as aid in dyslexia - University of Oxford

Video games that hold the attention proposed as aid in dyslexia - University of Oxford | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it

Dyslexic Oxford researcher discovers multisensory challenge that may point the way toward better educational and video game training strategies.


Dyslexic scientists may have the nod over many non-dyslexic scientists in the study of perceptual difficulties because they can recognize the challenges, but also not be biased by what has not yet been proven conclusively by research.

Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

Excerpt: "The researchers suggest that action video games, where attention is constantly shifting focus, may be able to boost literacy skills – though they have yet to test this. The findings are reported in the journal Current Biology.


'Imagine you are having a conversation with someone when suddenly you hear your name uttered behind you,' says Dr Vanessa Harrar of the Department of Experimental Psychology at the University of Oxford. 'Your attention shifts from the person you are talking to – the visual – to the sound behind you. This is an example of a cross-sensory shift of attention. We found that shifting attention from visual to auditory stimuli is particularly difficult for people who have dyslexia compared to good readers.'

The study is of personal interest to Dr Harrar, as she had some early difficulties in reading and writing. 'I was never actually diagnosed with dyslexia,' she says, 'and my difficulties were in the past. I was a very slow reader and made a ton of spelling mistakes. The more difficult it was to read, the less I did it and the more I fell behind my peers.

'I'm still a bit slower than most readers but otherwise I have overcome my difficulties...


She adds: 'Some people with dyslexia have more apparent auditory deficits, others visual, and perhaps others have more multisensory problems. In the long term, we'd like to be able to target dyslexia training programmes to the specific sensory deficit of each child.'


To read more: 

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    Dyslexia...the one label we don't mind having

    Dyslexia...the one label we don't mind having | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it
    I appreciate those who are concerned about not wanting to strap my child with a label. But, please know, I want my child to have that label. Not to define who he is, but to ensure an appropriate ed...
    Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

    "When dealing with dyslexia (and a lot of other things in life) clarity brings clarity. However…confusion, hiding, misunderstanding, or not knowing can often lead to shame. We’ve come far enough as a society to know that it is always better to stand and face things than to run away...I don’t want to pretend that nothing is wrong, while my very intelligent child is aware of the gap between him and the other students that continues to grow, because without identifying what is actually going on there will be no hope to find the appropriate interventions that can make a difference."


    "We shouldn’t be running away from the word dyslexia. These kids are creative, empathetic, 3D thinkers who can tell a story like nobody else. Given the appropriate instruction, we can take the negative out of being dyslexic and just leave behind the traits and characteristics that make them such unique individuals.


    “The happiest day of my life occurred when I found out I was dyslexic. I believe that life is finding solutions, and the worst feeling to me is confusion.” -Ennis Cosby "

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    Maryanne Wolf - Dyslexia as a Gift

    Maryanne Wolf - Dyslexia as a Gift | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it
    Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

    From Dr Maryanne Wolf:


    "...so often these are brains that are wired to see spatial patterns, to see the big picture, to go outside of the box, to think holistically.  Often they're artists, they're architects and yeah, that same advantage or set of advantages which made them before literacy, our generals, out builders, a lot of our great figures, that made a disadvantage at the same time for some of the wiring that goes into left hemisphere language processes.


    Now the real, if, if you wanna know my real task in life, it's to re-conceptualize or to help re-conceptualize dyslexia from being thought of as a deficit or something wrong with the brain, to realizing this is an extraordinary and beautiful brain that we have failed as an educational system to know how to teach easily when it comes to reading.  But that is the failure, not the child, but of us to understand..."

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    LD Friendly Colleges & College Transition Handbook

    Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

    Thanks @denveracademy for a great updated list of LD Friendly Colleges and resources for College and Transition #dyslexia #dyslexic #college #ld   http://www.denveracademy.org/document.doc?id=15

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    Dyslexic Scientist and Med School Lecturer Judith Williams

    Dyslexic Scientist and Med School Lecturer Judith Williams | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it

    "My dyslexia enables me to push my students beyond linear thinking... I see my dyslexia positively as a mechanism that helps my students to see the bigger picture."

    Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

    "My dyslexia enables me to push my students beyond linear thinking... I see my dyslexia positively as a mechanism that helps my students to see the bigger picture." -award winning dyslexic med school lecturer Judith Williams


    Excerpt: "In my junior academic years, I suffered from imposter syndrome – the feeling that you are inadequate and one step away from being exposed – and used to spend hours preparing everything so not be tripped up or caught out...


    I thought preparation would give me confidence, especially when teaching. Instead it limited and fought against my natural interactive and experiential style of teaching. By swallowing my pride and being open about my dyslexia, I'm now able to deliver fluid, flexible and – I hope – dynamic teaching.


    I will never stop having what has been described by many teachers as truly imaginative spellings. I often alter words, accidently, of course, and totally unaware of the highly suggestive alternatives that cause riotous laughter...


    Now I realise that this creativity is one of my strengths (and all through life I thought of it as a weakness). I will never be able to guarantee a teaching session with correct spellings and perfect grammar but my dyslexia enables me to push my students beyond linear thinking. I find it easy to make connections, pull together concepts and knowledge. In this way, I see my dyslexia positively as a mechanism that helps my students to see the bigger picture."


    Hooray for you Prof Williams!


    Read more: http://bit.ly/H1LwdW

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    What Is Dyslexia? - Increase Awareness of Dyslexic Advantages

    What Is Dyslexia? - Increase Awareness of Dyslexic Advantages | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it
    Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

    October is Dyslexia Awareness month. Please share this graphic to change what people think of when they think of dyslexia. For more resources and to join our community: http://dyslexicadvantage.com

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    Entrepreneur helps young dyslexics get their firms off the ground

    Entrepreneur helps young dyslexics get their firms off the ground | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it
    Adam Norris, a former director at broker Hargreaves Lansdown and dyslexic himself, set up Horatio Investments in 2010. It has £100million to invest in start-ups.
    Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

    Excerpt:" Norris, 42, said: ‘Many people at the very top of business have dyslexia, but dyslexics are often turned away or fail to push on because of their difficulty in learning to read or interpret words. 

    ‘However, dyslexics are often astute at creating ideas and have remarkable vision, while their work ethic to overcome their issue often sets them apart.’ "


    Would love to have Adam talk to dyslexic VCs here in the US. He really has vision. Powerful idea - more dyslexics helping dyslexics.

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    Dyslexics Top Codebreakers in the UK

    Dyslexics Top Codebreakers in the UK | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it
    A spokesman for the Government’s top-secret electronic eavesdropping station in Cheltenham, pictured, said last night that some of their most talented code-breakers have difficulty in learning to read or interpreting words.
    Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

    Excerpt: "Sir Iain Lobban, the director of GCHQ, said: ‘Part of my job is to attract the very best people and harness their talents, and not allow preconceptions and stereotypes to stifle innovation and agility.’

    Adrian Culley, a cyber expert and former Scotland Yard computer crime detective, said: ‘Dyslexic people have the ability of seeing codes with patterns, repetitions and omissions. 


    'Dyslexia may in other circumstances be regarded as negative – but most people only get to see the full jigsaw picture when it’s nearly finished while dyslexic cryptographists can see what the jigsaw puzzle looks like with just two pieces.’ "


    Too cool. Probably why there are so many dyslexics in fields such as internet security and white hat hacking.

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2362793/Dyslexia-Britains-secret-weapon-spy-war-Top-codebreakers-crack-complex-problems-suffer-condition.html#ixzz2Yz8BkJVz 

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    Lou Salza's curator insight, September 2, 2013 5:49 AM

    From our good friends, Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com

     

    Excerpt:

    "Last week MPs on the Commons Intelligence and Security Committee praised steps taken by spy chiefs to harness the skills of dyslexic code-breakers.

    The threat to the UK from cyber attacks, according to the report, is at its ‘highest level ever’ and is ‘disturbing’ in its scale  and complexity.

    Sufferer: Some of the world's greatest thinkers, including Albert Einstein, pictured, had dyslexia

    The MPs said the Cheltenham-based agency had set up a Dyslexia and Dyspraxia Support Group, which provides ‘mentoring and practical support to individuals’.

    A GCHQ spokesman said some of their most talented code-breakers were affected: ‘They are very creative but may need support, including adjustments in the workplace, such as IT tools and computer software, or [reductions] in their working hours.’

    In a speech last year, Sir Iain Lobban, the director of GCHQ, said: ‘Part of my job is to attract the very best people and harness their talents, and not allow preconceptions and stereotypes to stifle innovation and agility.’



    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2362793/Dyslexia-Britains-secret-weapon-spy-war-Top-codebreakers-crack-complex-problems-suffer-condition.html#ixzz2djru8FRw ;
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

    Abi James's curator insight, September 3, 2013 3:45 AM

    Nice to see recognition of those who may struggle academically but be highly skills at analysing and assessing information.

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    Max Brooks, Dyslexic Author of World War Z

    Max Brooks, Dyslexic Author of World War Z | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it

    "I decided to use the oral accounts because I am painfully dyslexic. And when I was growing up, audio books were the only way I could study. And one audio book that I listened to just for pleasure was Studs Terkel's The Good War, and that book never left me. And I wanted that to be the template for describing a global crisis, because I thought an oral history is a great way to bring in so many voices, literally, from all around the world."

    Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

    Max Brooks: "When I was 16, the first book I ever actually purchased with my own money, in fact, and had read on my own time was Hunt for Red October by Tom Clancy. ... It opened up a world into geopolitics, which continues to drive me to this day. And I would never have done that had I just listened to my current events class."


    Novels are often a great mind playground for dyslexic thinkers. From Wikipedia: "Brooks conducted copious research while writing World War Z to make the novel as realistic as possible. The technology, politics, economics, culture, and military tactics were based on a variety of reference books and consultations with expert sources[6]. Brooks also cites the U.S. Army as a reference on firearm statistics.[7]"


    Max Brooks is the son of Mel Brooks and Anne Bancroft.

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    TrishAJ's comment, July 30, 2013 11:40 AM
    Our dyslexic son finds it hard to finish reading novels. I'd like for him to read this one.
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    Strengthening Self-Image in Dyslexic Students

    Strengthening Self-Image in Dyslexic Students | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it

    Psychologist Michael Ryan and his tips for strengthening self image: recognizing MIND strengths, identifying passions and interests, and encouragement.


    Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

    "...improving one’s self-image involves three things: identifying advantages, nurturing passions, and encouragement."


    Dr. Ryan's advice ring completely true.


    "The contribution of supportive and significant adults in a child’s life to encourage a child’s interests and endeavors cannot be overestimated. Recognizing and praising the child’s accomplishments is only part of this process. It is important to complement specific characteristics of the child’s performance, considering the process rather than simply the end product.  Using phrases like, “I love the way you use the color red in this picture,” or “You really shot ahead in the last hundred yards of that race, you must’ve been exhausted,” or “You must feel proud of….” builds confidence in children.


    Finally, it is equally important for the adults in the child’s life to not only recognize their accomplishments but to also be involved. This may mean attending sporting events, playing video games, or helping to fix mini-bikes. It can be difficult for parents who do not share their child’s interest, but it’s important to find a way to generate that interest, for example, taking pictures of your child’s track meet. And rather than worry about the video games, keep in mind that these games are simply complex computer programs and may pique a child’s interest in becoming a computer programmer. Rap music often involves complex recording techniques that can foster an interest in technology and even help the child understand set theory.

    If dyslexic child grows up with a positive self-image, a supportive and caring environment, and an understanding of their advantages, there are few goals the individual cannot attain.


    Read more.

     



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    Angela C. Dowd's comment, May 17, 2013 10:34 AM
    Thanks...this puts a lot into perspective.
    DyslexicIT's curator insight, May 23, 2013 11:17 PM

    After years at school feeling failure every hour of every day - building self-esteem is vital.

    Hayley Groff's curator insight, December 8, 2013 8:45 PM

    Very true! 

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    Actor Steve McQueen and Dyslexia

    Actor Steve McQueen and Dyslexia | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it

    Steve Mcqueen was dyslexic and partially deaf. 


    He often performed his own stunt-driving in films like The Great Escape, where he can be seen both as himself and, with clever editing, as his Nazi pursuers.


    He was inducted into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame.

    Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

    Didn't know Steve McQueen (Magnificent Seven, Great Escape) was dyslexic. He had a difficult early life - the school things, but also a troubled home. He ultimately joined the Marines and had some troubles there (41 days in the brig!)  but focused himself and dedicated himself to self-improvement. He would ultimately save the lives of 5 other marines in the Artic and protect the president. The GI Bill helped him study acting.


    McQueen was an avid race car driver and motorcyclist.



    To read more about McQueen's life: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_McQueen

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    Lou Salza's curator insight, March 28, 2013 1:35 PM

    Who knew! I love his movies!-Lou

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    Misadventures in Spelling

    Misadventures in Spelling | Dyslexic Advantage Blog | Scoop.it

    "Dyslexia forced me to develop powers of concentration that have been invaluable throughout my career in business, philanthropy, and public life."

    Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com's insight:

    Children's book and young adult author Kate Scott reflects on her dyslexia and Nelson Rockefeller's letter to dyslexic children in her blog. Pretty cool that she's able to write about a dyslexic teen who is read this letter. 


    "In the novel, she is read an excerpt of this same letter that inspired me so much as a child."


    Read more. 

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    Lou Salza's curator insight, March 15, 2013 2:46 PM


    Excerpt from a letter written by Nelson Rockerfeller:


    " ....Looking back over the years, I remember vividly the pain and mortification I felt as a boy of 8, when I was assigned to read a short passage of Scripture at a community vesper service during summer vacation in Main—and did a thoroughly miserable job of it.

    I know what a dyslexic child goes through—the frustration of not being able to do what other children co easily, the humiliation of being thought not too bright when such is not the case at all.
    My personal discoveries as to what is required to cope with dyslexia could be summarized in these admonitions to the individual dyslexic:
    - Accept the fact that you have a problem—don’t just try to hide it.
    - Refuse to feel sorry for yourself.
    - Realize that you don’t have an excuse—you have a challenge.
    - Face the challenge.
    - Work harder and learn mental discipline—the capacity for total concentration—and
    - Never Quit...."

    Cathy Booth's curator insight, March 20, 2013 5:15 AM

    I like this blog and this article quoting Rockefeller's letter is really goood.