Dyslexia the Motoric Form
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Millions Have Dyslexia, Few Understand It  @lawrenceschool.org @NPR

Millions Have Dyslexia, Few Understand It  @lawrenceschool.org @NPR | Dyslexia the Motoric Form | Scoop.it

Despite stumbling over the simplest words, Thomas — a fourth-grader — is a bright kid. In fact, that's an often-misunderstood part of dyslexia: It's not about lacking comprehension, having a low IQ or being deprived of a good education.

It's about having a really hard time reading.
Dyslexia is the most common learning disability in the United States. It touches the lives of millions of people........


Via Lou Salza, Rowe Young- Kaple
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Tamara Quintana's curator insight, November 29, 9:34 PM

Good read when looking at dyslexia

Tamara Quintana's curator insight, November 29, 9:35 PM

Good read when looking at Dyslexia

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Millions Have Dyslexia, Few Understand It  @lawrenceschool.org @NPR

Millions Have Dyslexia, Few Understand It  @lawrenceschool.org @NPR | Dyslexia the Motoric Form | Scoop.it

Despite stumbling over the simplest words, Thomas — a fourth-grader — is a bright kid. In fact, that's an often-misunderstood part of dyslexia: It's not about lacking comprehension, having a low IQ or being deprived of a good education.

It's about having a really hard time reading.
Dyslexia is the most common learning disability in the United States. It touches the lives of millions of people........


Via Lou Salza
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Tamara Quintana's curator insight, November 29, 9:34 PM

Good read when looking at dyslexia

Tamara Quintana's curator insight, November 29, 9:35 PM

Good read when looking at Dyslexia

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What are dyslexia, dyscalculia, dyspraxia and dysgraphia?

What are dyslexia, dyscalculia, dyspraxia and dysgraphia? | Dyslexia the Motoric Form | Scoop.it
What are dyslexia, dyscalculia, dyspraxia and dysgraphia? - These excellent visuals come from aboutdyspraxia.com (website seems to be down at time of writing) and offer a quick reference fo
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Why Dyslexia Awareness is Important - Differently Wired

Why Dyslexia Awareness is Important - Differently Wired https://t.co/zKskiYaPWo via @DifferentlyMike
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Mark Brace: Dyslexia in our classrooms - New Zealand Herald

Mark Brace: Dyslexia in our classrooms - New Zealand Herald | Dyslexia the Motoric Form | Scoop.it

"

"These children are not bad at learning. They just learn differently. The changes that need to be made are around how we approach teaching. I have discovered that a learning environment that gets it right for dyslexic learners, gets it right for all learners. We need an education system that is flexible; a system that fits around the needs of the children in the broadest emotional as well as academic sense.

A learning environment that works best for everyone contains particular physical and cultural traits. And those traits can be identified. For example, the ideal learning environment stimulates and celebrates thinking and creativity ahead of 'process'. And it may seem odd to need to point this out, but we as humans, are social creatures, and we seek out positive interactions and happiness. Therefore, a strong and trusting relationship between the teacher and the student, as well as between students, is essential. The research tells us that happy learners make great learners. Learning that is not forced, works best."

Read more of this post by clicking the link below


Via NYC Dyslexia
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By identifying the reversed sensation felt by these learners, turning the hand (and keeping it that way)  so that they can feel the top side of movement will make a world of difference as they learn the movement involved in learning.    

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AMERICAN DYSLEXIA

A look at how Public Schools, School Districts, States and Washington violate the civil rights of Dyslexic students.

Via Carolyn D Cowen
Rowe Young- Kaple's insight:

Help for our cause is always needed!

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Dr. Pat McGuire's curator insight, July 6, 2015 2:58 PM

I have worked as a developmental and behavioral pediatrician for 30 years (since my residency ended) and have identified many hundreds of students, and some adults, with dyslexia.  I have been involved with the International Dyslexia Association, both in the state of Iowa and nationally since the early 1990's.  While Arne Duncan (US Dept. of Ed.) says things are better, the reality is that it is moving at glacial rates in most parts of this country, Iowa included.  Iowa just had a bill signed by Governor Branstad in July 2014  making it a duty of all schools to identify children with dyslexia by 3rd grade.  But as of a year later, few (If any) districts are actually doing that or getting training for teachers to be trained in the specific reading programs that have been found effective for students with dyslexia. There are 3 school districts in Eastern Iowa who have been on top of this issue since the late 1980's, however, who have incorporated these programs into their general education classrooms with good results. A few more began coming on board since 2000, again with improvements for their students. But they did so without actually having a diagnosis but rather bringing the training to all students.

 

Dyslexia does not need a doctor's diagnosis since the tools used come from the education and speech/language disciplines. But until schools are willing to use the appropriate tools to assess for the key areas of deficit (phonemic and phonologic awareness, decoding and encoding (spelling) skills, as well as other language based problems that are caused by the problems processing the sounds in oral language which can lead to memory and comprehension problems) the diagnosis will end up coming from people like me and institutions that do tertiary care, such as universities.

 

We need to take this seriously so that we don't end up spending our public dollars later for juvenile delinquency, drug and alcohol abuse, under and unemployment, and broken homes due to the anxiety and depression that don't allow the individual to be there for the people he loves.

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Brain differences seen in children with dyslexia, dysgraphia

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Brain differences seen in children with dyslexia, dysgraphia 
Via Carolyn D Cowen
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Inversion of writing letters can effect both those with identified dyslexia and those with WLD written language disabilities

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Carolyn D Cowen's curator insight, June 11, 2015 12:47 PM

Recent study finds structural brain differences between children w/ dyslexia & dysgraphia and children. w

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Dyslexia Unrelated to Vision Problems: Study - US News

Dyslexia Unrelated to Vision Problems: Study - US News | Dyslexia the Motoric Form | Scoop.it
Eye therapies will not cure reading disorder, experts say

Via Carolyn D Cowen
Rowe Young- Kaple's insight:

Read:

Eye Dominance Difference Connection to LD Learning Disabilities

http://acascipub.com/World%20Journal%20of%20Psychology%20Research/Current%20Issues.php

 
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David Flink, author of Thinking Differently

David Flink, author of Thinking Differently | Dyslexia the Motoric Form | Scoop.it
In a scholastic milieu where the odds were stacked against him from even before his early diagnosis of dyslexia and ADHD (in 5th grade), David has faced a new Goliath so often, so calmly, and with such inevitable success, it's no wonder he has...

Via Collection of First
Rowe Young- Kaple's insight:

This is common story regarding bright students who have differences that make the academic world difficult.  

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Marie Schoeman's curator insight, May 19, 2015 12:40 PM

Role models who have achieved against all odds can inspire all children with ADHD.

Jacqui Jacobs's curator insight, September 7, 2015 6:04 AM

 Creating a platform to learners where all can feel accepted and free to be different is setting the scene to success. 

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Brain 'architecture' differs in kids with dyslexia - Futurity

Brain 'architecture' differs in kids with dyslexia - Futurity | Dyslexia the Motoric Form | Scoop.it
Neuroimaging shows that "white matter" behaves differently in the brains of children with dyslexia, a disorder that makes reading a struggle.

Via Carolyn D Cowen
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Another study comparing differences in the brain of dyslexics

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Terry Doherty's curator insight, November 2, 2014 3:27 PM

The article is fairly technical, but you can scroll down to get to the essence for helping dyslexic learners: "The typically developing readers showed greater connectivity to linguistic regions than the dyslexic group. Those with dyslexia showed greater connectivity to visual and (memory encoding and retrieval) regions."

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@Learning_Ally Denver Schools give 80K audiobooks to struggling students @lawrenceschool @cdcowen

@Learning_Ally Denver Schools give 80K audiobooks to struggling students @lawrenceschool @cdcowen | Dyslexia the Motoric Form | Scoop.it
DENVER - Denver Public Schools gave 80,000 audiobooks to students struggling with dyslexia.

Dyslexia and other reading disabilities affect one in every five Colorado students according to Learning Alley, a national nonprofit organization who helps students who are blind, visually impaired, or dyslexic.

Students will be able to access 80,000 books on their computers, tablets, smartphones, iPods, or other devices. The audiobooks include textbooks and other literature titles.

Now more than 4,500 students in 165 Denver Public Schools will have access to audiobook technology due to a partnership with Learning Ally and a grant from The Denver Foundation.

The number of students enrolled in the Learning Ally program is expected to reach 5,200 students this year and 85 percent of Denver Public Schools are currently enrolled in the Learning Ally program.

Via Lou Salza
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This is great!
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Lou Salza's curator insight, April 23, 2015 4:45 PM

I LOVE this! Kudos to Denver and Learning Ally!!--Lou

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Parents call for more help to identify dyslexic students - WISH-TV

Parents call for more help to identify dyslexic students
WISH-TV
INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — Some Indiana parents say schools need more help recognizing the signs of dyslexia before children fall too far behind.

Via EUdyslexia
Rowe Young- Kaple's insight:

For more ways to identify LD in bright students read: 

Effects of Physical Rotational Movement Difference and Handwriting Position on Academic Achievement and Learning Disabilities  http://www.scirp.org/Journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=54032

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Learning Disabled or School Disabled? - Independent Ideas Blog @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @Ryan_Masa

Learning Disabled or School Disabled? - Independent Ideas Blog @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @Ryan_Masa | Dyslexia the Motoric Form | Scoop.it
People readily accept that individuals can be reliably differentiated from each other based on fingerprints and DNA. Yet regardless of all that researchers have learned about the brain, educators continue to cling to the belief that it makes sense to treat children as though their brains are (or should be) the same -- identical motherboards fitted with identically stamped circuitry. We have built a system of schooling on the myth of the "normal" brain, the comfortable belief that normal people must all learn the same way, that education can be standardized --standardized curricula, standardized course loads, standardized requirements, standardized teaching methods and lessons, standardized tests, standardized expectations.

Alas, this model hasn't worked out very well. Each brain is a complex web of billions of neural networks, each a unique tapestry woven from different experiences, genetic combinations, and chemistry. Children come to school with profiles of cognitive strengths and weaknesses as different from one another as their fingerprints. As a result, they understand and wrestle with problems in many different ways. They need flexible environments that help them find their own path to learning and, ultimately, to meaningful work.

Stories abound of people who were labeled in school and tormented for having some form of abnormal LD and who became successful in careers in which their "disability" proved to be an asset: dyslexics whose different perceptual abilities suited them to careers in astrophysics, biology, engineering, physics, the arts, and mathematics. 

Via Lou Salza
Rowe Young- Kaple's insight:

This is a typical problem for the typical  bright RPS student.  To help see why,  read my new paper: Effects of Physical Rotational Movement Difference and Handwriting Position on Academic Achievement and Learning Disabilities was published in Vol. 6 No.3, 2015. The DOI is 10.4236/psych.2015.63024

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Lou Salza's curator insight, March 11, 2015 9:19 PM

Thank you Alden Blodget! I could not have said this better!--Lou

My favorite passage:

"....Many educators know that there is something wrong.  The recognition of "multiple intelligences" and different "learning styles" or "temperaments" has led to some "experiential education" and "differentiated instruction" (and, occasionally, to truly differentiated schools). But so far, these efforts seem little more than a bit of tinkering -- like Procrustes offering a choice of blankets. The system itself and the entrenched, faulty assumptions about how people learn remain unchanged. Diagnoses of learning disabilities continue to increase, and standardization marches on, right over my grandson....

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 11, 2015 10:51 PM

Although I have not read his work extensively, Bernard Stiegler has some interesting and controversial ideas about learning disabilities such as ADD and ADHD. He sees it as less the person and more institutional and technological.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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'B' And 'D' Learning Process Debunks Dyslexia Jumbled-Letters Myth

'B' And 'D' Learning Process Debunks Dyslexia Jumbled-Letters Myth | Dyslexia the Motoric Form | Scoop.it
Many believe dyslexia is about jumbled letters, but experts say that's not quite right. This story explores what's happening in the brain that causes those backward letters.
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Download Essentials of Dyslexia Assessment and Intervention E-Book Free

Essentials of Dyslexia Assessment and Intervention http://mortalbooks.com/0470927607
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NPR Releases New Dyslexia Series - DIFFERENT BRAINS

NPR Releases New Dyslexia Series - DIFFERENT BRAINS https://t.co/ELabrRt5vD via @BrowardESOL
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Millions Have Dyslexia, Few Understand It

Millions Have Dyslexia, Few Understand It | Dyslexia the Motoric Form | Scoop.it
It's the most common learning disability, yet it's still hard to answer the question: What is it? An NPR reporter who has dyslexia talks with other people — young and old
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Why College Is Better For Students With ADHD | ThinkProgress - ThinkProgress

Why College Is Better For Students With ADHD | ThinkProgress - ThinkProgress | Dyslexia the Motoric Form | Scoop.it
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder can often benefit from the self-driven nature of college courses.

Via Collection of First
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Good advice
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Dyslexia is no bar to Formula 1 racing champions @lawrenceschool

Dyslexia is no bar to Formula 1 racing champions @lawrenceschool | Dyslexia the Motoric Form | Scoop.it
Being a dyslexic might be a problem when reading in the classroom, but it hasn’t stopped some of Britain’s greatest racing drivers from achieving success – men like Jackie Stewart, Nigel Mansell and Johhny Herbert. Stewart believes that it ultimately played a key role in his success on track.
Canadian F1 writer and friend of JA on F1, Jeff Pappone investigates:
Dyslexics are always finding work arounds for things that come easily for others, Stewart insisted that his disability led him down paths that others might ignore, something that gave him extra ammo to help defeat his rivals.
“The dyslexic cannot think like the ‘clever’ folk, so they have to be thinking out of the box and if they are doing that, they are finding new ways of doing things,” said Stewart who was one of the first F1 drivers to cultivate sponsorship.
“When I was a racing driver, I had a really good communication system with my engineers. I could paint pictures of how my car was behaving, what it felt like, how it did this or that, and I could explain it graphically and make them feel it, so they had a better chance of thinking ‘Hey, I never thought of that.’”

Via Lou Salza
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So true!
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Lou Salza's curator insight, June 30, 2015 7:25 AM

Stewart has been an eloquent spokesperson for the impact of dyslexia since he brought his own son to the US in the 1980's for an opportunity to attend the Landmark school for dyslexics in Massachusetts. I love Stewart's description of his own thought process when confronting problems. --Lou

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Dyslexia Unrelated to Vision Problems: Study - US News

Dyslexia Unrelated to Vision Problems: Study - US News | Dyslexia the Motoric Form | Scoop.it
Eye therapies will not cure reading disorder, experts say

Via Carolyn D Cowen
Rowe Young- Kaple's insight:

Eye Dominance Difference Connection to LD Learning Disabilities

http://acascipub.com/World%20Journal%20of%20Psychology%20Research/Current%20Issues.php

 
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New Research: Students Benefit from Learning That Intelligence Is Not Fixed @lawrenceschool

New Research: Students Benefit from Learning That Intelligence Is Not Fixed @lawrenceschool | Dyslexia the Motoric Form | Scoop.it
Even a one-time, 30-minute online intervention can spur academic gains for many students, particularly those with poor grades. The premise is that these positive effects can stick over years, leading for example to higher graduation rates; but long-term data is still needed to confirm that.

Earlier, well-designed tests of simple and relatively inexpensive growth-mindset interventions had surprisingly shown improvements in students’ grades over weeks or months. For instance, promising results from one famous experiment – an eight-session workshop in 91 seventh graders in a New York City school – led psychology researchers Carol Dweck and Lisa Blackwell to start up Mindset Works, a company that offers a computer-based program called Brainology.

Via Lou Salza
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Good information for bright students who are not doing well
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Lou Salza's curator insight, May 20, 2015 3:41 PM

I recommend Dweck's book - Lou

Lon Woodbury's curator insight, May 20, 2015 7:13 PM

We already know that a positive attitude can change accomplishment.  This article makes intuitive sense that ability can increase with proper exposure to a positive mindset.  -Lon

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The Difference Between IEPs and 504 Plans @lawrenceschool @UnderstoodOrg

The Difference Between IEPs and 504 Plans @lawrenceschool @UnderstoodOrg | Dyslexia the Motoric Form | Scoop.it
Both Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and 504 plans can offer formal help for K–12 students with learning and attention issues. They’re similar in some ways but quite different in others. This chart compares them side-by-side to help you understand the differences.

Via Lou Salza
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Good information!

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Lou Salza's curator insight, May 5, 2015 2:52 PM

Useful, clear information!

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Brain differences seen in children with dyslexia, dysgraphia

Brain differences seen in children with dyslexia, dysgraphia | Dyslexia the Motoric Form | Scoop.it
Structural brain differences between children with dyslexia and dysgraphia and children who are typical language learners have been observed by researchers in a recent study. Researchers say the findings prove that using a single category of learning disability to qualify for special education services is not scientifically supported.

Via Carolyn D Cowen
Rowe Young- Kaple's insight:
This is important information!
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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, April 29, 2015 1:56 PM

It is a real improvement to be able to get something quantitative measuring the differences.  Makes getting a handle on what the situation is much more objective. -Lon

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New law preserves penmanship in classroom

New law preserves penmanship in classroom | Dyslexia the Motoric Form | Scoop.it
When it comes to written communications, before the advent of smartphones, texting and computers, cursive was the way to go. Examples of cursive writing date back to the time of the Romans, but like Latin, cursive writing appeared to be a dying form of communication.

With people typing more rather than writing, cursive has been falling by the wayside. Many schools even stopped teaching children cursive writing, and the Common Core Standards do not include the subject. It's been no different in Arkansas as schools dropped it as part of their curriculum.

Until now.

Thanks to state Rep. Kim Hendren and the Legislature, teaching cursive writing in Arkansas schools will be mandatory beginning next school year. Act 160 of 2015 requires that students be taught cursive writing by the end of third grade.

Dillon Milton, a third grade student at Cotter Elementary School, ponders his next move while doing a cursive handwriting assignment on Wednesday, Mach 11, 2015. The Arkansas Legislature recently passed a law requiring cursive handwriting be taught by the end of third grade. (Photo: Kevin Pieper/The Baxter Bulletin)
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Betsy Henry — a third-grade teacher at Amanda Gist Elementary in Cotter, who has taught cursive writing for 25 years — says she thinks it's a good idea, and just because it's not included in Common Core, "doesn't mean it's not important."

Family inspires law

Hendren, a Republican from Gravette, said the inspiration to introduce the measure came from his granddaughter and wife. He told The Bulletin his granddaughter is an eighth-grader in Gravette who takes part in many school activities. However, her grandmother learned "she didn't know how to sign her name in cursive."

“I know it was not included in the Common Core Standards, but just because it’s not included doesn’t mean it’s not important.”
Besty Henry, third-grade teacher Amanda Gist Elementary
He said that's when they learned cursive was not being taught at Gravette because of Common Core. Other schools across Arkansas also dropped cursive after the state adopted the Common Core Standards.

The veteran lawmaker said cursive writing is part of a well-rounded education, and believes that even with technology, "we need to keep our roots in mind."

Hendren's bill created debate among legislators. Rep. Jana Della Rosa, R-Rogers, contended there's not much use for cursive writing any more because "almost everything is electronic." Sen. Bruce Maloch, D-Magnolia, supported the idea of teaching cursive, but thought it was more of an action for the Education Department than the Legislature.

When the measure came up for a vote in the House, Mountain Home's Nelda Speaks, a Republican, and Democrat Scott Baltz of Pocahontas voted for it. Rep. Kelley Linck of Flippin and John Payton of Wilburn, both Republicans, voted against it.

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Adalynn Clonts, a third-grade student at Cotter Elementary School, practices cursive handwriting. (Photo: Kevin Pieper/The Baxter Bulletin)
In the Senate, Sens. Scott Flippo of Bull Shoals and Missy Irvin of Mountain View supported it.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson signed the cursive bill into law in late February. Earlier in the legislative session, he signed a bill requiring computer science be taught in high schools. He called the two acts "a great balance."

"I don't think it is inconsistent in my view or inconsistent in practice," Hutchinson said. "I work on my computer, but there is nothing more significant than being able to write a handwritten personal note to a friend or colleague."

Making connections

Henry said learning cursive writing is good for children, and they're eager to learn it. "Kids look forward to writing cursive from the time they first see it, when their grandmas and their grandpas sign their Valentine cards and their birthday cards," she said.

"They see it, and they wonder what it is, and so they think, 'Well, someday I'm going to get to learn what this is.' So, they look forward to it."

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Cotter third-grade students Kendra Pace, from left, Brooks Cheek and Sean Anitoni practice cursive handwriting. The Arkansas Legislature recently passed a law requiring cursive handwriting be taught by the end of third grade. (Photo: Kevin Pieper/The Baxter Bulletin)
"It's important for that same reason that they be able to connect with older generations," Henry added, "like their grandparents, again, because they write little notes in there and they don't want somebody to have to interpret what it says."

CORESTANDARDS
Home | Common Core State Standards Initiative

Some of her students echo that sentiment.

"I really like cursive," Brooks Cheek said. "I like pretty handwriting, I've always liked that. I also like writing cursive, because it makes me feel like I'm growing up, because that's how adults write."


Calli Dilbeck said, "I like cursive because it's a lot faster and really easy, and it makes you understand reading cursive more. There are things you need to read in cursive."

Plus, Dilbeck had another reason for students to learn cursive: "When they get into college, they have to do their signature a lot."

“I really like cursive. I like pretty handwriting, I’ve always liked that.”
Brooks Cheek, third grader at Amanda Gist Elementary
"I know it was not included in the Common Core Standards, but just because it's not included doesn't mean it's not important," Henry said. "And cursive is important to learn."

Like other supporters of cursive, Henry says it helps students with learning issues. "It helps kids with dyslexia. It's like a tool for them to use. It straightens out a 'b' and a 'd,' it straightens out a 'p' and a 'q.' "

And like other proponents, Henry said, "It's important to be able to read old documents in their original forms.

"It's important to carry on traditions, too, and cursive writing is a tradition."

Mixed public views

Among the public, there are mixed reactions to the legislation and requiring cursive writing be taught.

"In my opinion, we are trying to 'dummy down' our children instead of educating them. This is coming from a retired educator," said Marsha Barker, formerly of Mountain Home. "Our students need to have an equal opportunity to compete in today's business world. Being able to correctly fill out a job application, sign their name — in cursive — and to be able to read and understand what they are signing is crucial."


Beginning next school year in Arkansas it will be mandatory that students be taught cursive writing by the end of the third grade. (Photo: USA Today)
"While I think penmanship is an important aspect of learning, I think that there are far more important things the Legislature should have been concerned with regarding education in our state," said Heather Graham of Mountain Home.


ARKANSASED
State Board of Education | Arkansas Department of Education

"In addition to the eye-hand coordination that it takes to create the flowing words, it also is good for the mind," said Candy Barnes of Mountain Home. "Each of the activities that a child's mind masters increases the connectedness of the brain. Being able to see words as units instead of bits, being able to create a handwriting style that is personal, and having the ability to think of language from more than one point of view, are skills that every child needs."


THE BAXTER BULLETIN
Steve Barnes: Students learning cursive in computer age

"Everyone needs to be taught to type. Cursive will go the way of the buggy whip and it is now a waste of time," said Jim Smith of Mountain Home. "If signing your name is important to you, learn that. I am so glad I learned to type when in junior high school. I print everything that I don't type."

"I think the thing that bothers me most about children not being taught cursive writing is that they wouldn't be able to read handwriting of their ancestors," said Debbie Barron of Marshal. "Some of my most prized possessions are some of the handwritten items I have that belonged to my grandparents and parents and others. Somehow cursive writing just has so much more personality than printed writing does."

"Teach them," said Jill Chandler of Mountain Home. "Then, when they're older, they can decide how they want to write. Give them all the opportunity to learn it."

"It helps to develop self-esteem and improvement of life. My first- and second-grade teacher stressed it as important as math and reading," said Tommy Dean Johnson of Bruno. "My handwriting has been complimented on over the years, and I always gave credit to Miss Faye for that."

"I can't agree with the majority here. My oldest son has a condition called Convergence, which made it virtually impossible for him to learn cursive," said Bonnie Dillard of Yellville. "He struggled just to learn to write in block letters and, as an adult, still has to sign his name by printing it. If there are no exceptions in the law for this, a child who has the same difficulty or another learning disability could flunk school just because of this."

"I am torn on this," said Martin Kellem of Mountain Home. "I think it should be taught, and then again, it seems to be a lot of wasted energy for little results. It's like teaching kids Morse Code. Yeah, it takes up a bit of time and some of the kids like it, but is it going to be used as a form of communication by future generations?"

Pam Stoker of Thornfield, Mo., had a different take on it: "One day there will be a big computer crash, then what? Kids can't do anything without a computer. They must have some backup."


Making change and balancing checkbooks

Cursive writing isn't the only thing Rep. Kim Hendren, R-Gravette, thinks is needed in Arkansas schools.

He introduced House Bill 1226 which would require that students, at some point during their public education, be taught as a part of math education — and demonstrate — how to make change. That measure is scheduled to come before the House Education Committee on Tuesday.

Hendren said a colleague, Rep. Gary Deffenbaugh, R-Van Buren, has filed a bill to allow high school students to take alternative courses to higher algebra and calculus. An engineer himself, Hendren said those classes may be suited for some students, but there also are students graduating who don't know how to make change, how to reconcile a checkbook, or how to figure compound interest.

He said students should be offered alternatives to "exotic" math courses for something more practical for them.

Via Charles Tiayon
Rowe Young- Kaple's insight:

Maybe the rest of the country will follow suit!

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What Musicians Can Tell Us About Dyslexia and the Brain | WIRED

What Musicians Can Tell Us About Dyslexia and the Brain | WIRED | Dyslexia the Motoric Form | Scoop.it
Musicians with dyslexia are extremely uncommon. A new study, the first to look at this rare group, challenges some of the conventional thinking on the relationship between language and music.
Rowe Young- Kaple's insight:

I find this not to be the case.  Many very talented musicians even with much musical training CAN NOT READ MUSIC!  What could be the reason behind this.  In many cases these are case studies who have been identified as LD very young.  They had trouble learning to read words even though being identified as being very intelligent.  Once the code was broken however, they became good readers of written words.  But still never were able to read music.

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