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Brain Training: Parents, save your money

Brain Training: Parents, save your money | Dyslexia DiaBlogue® | Scoop.it
“We measure every student pre- and post-training with a version of the Woodcock-Johnson general intelligence test,” said Ken Gibson, who began franchising LearningRx centers in 2003, and has data on more than 30,000 of the nearly 50,000 students who have been trained. “The average gain on I.Q. is 15 points after 24 weeks of training, and 20 points in less than 32 weeks.”

The three other large cognitive training services — Lumosity, Cogmed and Posit Science — dance around the question of whether they truly raise I.Q. but do assert that they improve cognitive performance.

Detterman said of brain training, “It’s probably not harmful. But I would tell parents: Save your money.

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Dyslexia DiaBlogue®
Dyslexia & related topics in literacy, learning differences, and neuroscience. (Find me on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/cdcowen. See my other Scoop-It pages: http://www.scoop.it/t/dyslexia-diablogue-ida-examiner AND http://www.scoop.it/t/dyslexia-literacy-and-new-media-literacy)
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Neuroanatomy Online: An Open Access Electronic Laboratory for the Neurosciences | Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy - The University of Texas Medical School at Houston

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Lawrence School: Re-Imagining School - YouTube @cdcowen @lawrenceschool

Students learn best when their differences are understood and accepted, when appropriate accommodations are made available and, most importantly, when their strengths as learners are defined, affirmed, and cultivated. Our approach – respecting differences and building on strengths – is vital for students who learn differently and may well serve as a successful model for educating all students, in all schools.

Via Lou Salza
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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, March 21, 4:42 PM

As Salza says, this ability to accommodate to individual student differences is not good just for student with learning differences, but to all students and the resources, technology and knowledge exists to do this in mainstream schools also. -Lon

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There is a science to reading instruction; there is a science to implementation

There is a science to reading instruction; there is a science to implementation | Dyslexia DiaBlogue® | Scoop.it

While IDA members have long embraced the science of reading, there is another science of equal importance that directly influences the success of lasting change in reading instruction within schools and districts: implementation science.ere to edit the title

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Common-Core Backlash: Track State Efforts

Anxiety about and opposition to the Common Core State Standards continues to highlight many debates about education policy. Track the progress of state lawmakers' efforts to reassess the standards using this interactive.
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Brain 'architecture' differs in kids with dyslexia - Futurity

Brain 'architecture' differs in kids with dyslexia - Futurity | Dyslexia DiaBlogue® | Scoop.it
Neuroimaging shows that "white matter" behaves differently in the brains of children with dyslexia, a disorder that makes reading a struggle.
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Terry Doherty's curator insight, November 2, 2014 3:27 PM

The article is fairly technical, but you can scroll down to get to the essence for helping dyslexic learners: "The typically developing readers showed greater connectivity to linguistic regions than the dyslexic group. Those with dyslexia showed greater connectivity to visual and (memory encoding and retrieval) regions."

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Teaching Writing to Dyslexic Students - Dr Charley Haynes - YouTube

Teaching Writing to Dyslexic Students - Dr Charley Haynes - YouTube | Dyslexia DiaBlogue® | Scoop.it
Dyslexic Advantage visits with Dr Charley Haynes provides practical strategies to help students with dyslexia with writing, elaboration, paragraph cohesion, ...
Carolyn D Cowen's insight:

Awesome!

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Uncovering the Mysteries of Dyslexia, G. Reid Lyon, Ph. D - YouTube

Closing the Gap Between What We Know about Dyslexia & What We Do in the Classroom Keynote Address, PBIDA Fall Conference, October 4th, 2013 The National Righ...
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Can Brain Scans Help Predict Young Children's Reading Abilities? - US News

Can Brain Scans Help Predict Young Children's Reading Abilities? - US News | Dyslexia DiaBlogue® | Scoop.it
Imaging might detect early reading troubles like dyslexia, researchers say
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A Historic Hearing on Dyslexia

A Historic Hearing on Dyslexia | Dyslexia DiaBlogue® | Scoop.it
For two hours at the Rayburn Office Building of the House of Representatives on Capitol Hill, there were no Democrats or Republicans -- just citizens who are concerned about the prevalence of dyslexia in our nation’s children, and convinced that something huge needs to be done to help these kids read, learn and thrive. The Congressional Committee Hearing on The Science of Dyslexia brought educators, parents, and lawmakers to the table.
Carolyn D Cowen's insight:

An excellent summary! Yes, I do think we can refer to this one as historic without fear of overstating things.

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Full Committee Hearing - The Science of Dyslexia | Committee on Science - U.S. House of Representatives

Full Committee Hearing - The Science of Dyslexia | Committee on Science - U.S. House of Representatives | Dyslexia DiaBlogue® | Scoop.it
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Dr Louisa Moats: We need to be outraged | Spelfabet

Dr Louisa Moats: We need to be outraged | Spelfabet | Dyslexia DiaBlogue® | Scoop.it
Awarded the LDA 2014 Eminent Researcher Award, Dr Louisa Moats talked about the persistence of bad literacy teaching practices, and the need for this to change.
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Your Brain Is Primed To Reach False Conclusions by CHRISTIE ASCHWANDEN @Ryan_Masa @lawrenceschool

Your Brain Is Primed To Reach False Conclusions by CHRISTIE ASCHWANDEN  @Ryan_Masa @lawrenceschool | Dyslexia DiaBlogue® | Scoop.it
Paul Offit likes to tell a story about how his wife, pediatrician Bonnie Offit, was about to give a child a vaccination when the kid was struck by a seizure. Had she given the injection a minute sooner, Paul Offit says, it would surely have appeared as though the vaccine had caused the seizure and probably no study in the world would have convinced the parent otherwise. (The Offits have such studies at the ready — Paul is the director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and author of “Deadly Choices: How the Anti-Vaccine Movement Threatens Us All.”) Indeed, famous anti-vaxxer Jenny McCarthy has said her son’s autism and seizures are linked to “so many shots” because vaccinations preceded his symptoms.

But, as Offit’s story suggests, the fact that a child became sick after a vaccine is not strong evidence that the immunization was to blame. Psychologists have a name for the cognitive bias that makes us prone to assigning a causal relationship to two events simply because they happened one after the other: the “illusion of causality.” A study recently published in the British Journal of Psychology investigates how this illusion influences the way we process new information. Its finding: Causal illusions don’t just cement erroneous ideas in the mind; they can also prevent new information from correcting them.

Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, February 25, 9:03 AM

Thank You to our good friend and colleague Steven Dykstra from  spelltalk@listserve.com for this provocative article. The subject of this study is how quickly "Illusions of causality" form in medicine especially around the vaccination debate going on in the US right now. These illusions establish a strong grip on our minds that will not yield to sound data, evidence or information that exposes the fallacy. I read this because Steven Dykstra used it as an example of why it is so hard to get evidence based reading education practices firmly established in our schools. I have written before about my own work in schools with teachers --that there is integrity in resistance to change.  This article provides data about where that integrity resides. --Lou

The last paragraph is a call to action:

 

Excerpt:

 

"...the lesson of controversial political, health and science issues is that people don’t apply their critical-thinking skills in the same way when they have a preference for who’s right.” Studies by law professor Dan Kahan at Yale show that even highly numerate people are prone to cognitive trapswhen the data contradicts the conclusion most congenial to their political values.

So where does this leave us? With a lot of evidence that erroneous beliefs aren’t easily overturned, and when they’re tinged with emotion, forget about it. Explaining the science and helping people understand it are only the first steps. If you want someone to accept information that contradicts what they already know, you have to find a story they can buy into. That requires bridging the narrative they’ve already constructed to a new one that is both true and allows them to remain the kind of person they believe themselves to be."

 

 

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Eye Movements and Reading

Eye Movements and Reading | Dyslexia DiaBlogue® | Scoop.it
If you watch the eyes of a person scanning text at a normal rate, the eye seems to be ahead of the voice when we read aloud. The precision eye-movement research of scientists such as Rayner and Pollatsek (1989) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology showed in many experiments over 20 years that the reading eye fixates on most content words (especially nouns and verbs) in a rapid series of stops and jumps called fixations and saccades.
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The next frontier in workplace diversity: brain differences

The next frontier in workplace diversity: brain differences | Dyslexia DiaBlogue® | Scoop.it
We are on the cusp of a civil rights movement for workers on the autism spectrum and those who have conditions like ADHD and dyslexia. Companies and managers at many companies have already begun to take note.
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Holding Kids Back Doesn't Help! So what does Ohio's 3rd grade Reading Requirement Guarantee?

Holding Kids Back Doesn't Help! So what does Ohio's 3rd grade Reading Requirement Guarantee? | Dyslexia DiaBlogue® | Scoop.it
At a time when more states are moving to retain struggling students in lower grades, research shows that such efforts are counterproductive, Deborah Stipek and Michael Lombardo say.

 

A majority of peer-reviewed studies over the past 30 years have demonstrated that holding students back yields little or no long-term academic benefits and can actually be harmful to students. When improvements in achievement are linked to retention, they are not usually sustained beyond a few years, and there is some evidence for negative effects on self-esteem and emotional well-being.

Moreover, there is compelling evidence that retention can reduce the probability of high school graduation. According to a 2005 review of decades of studies by Nailing Xia and Elizabeth Glennie: "Research has consistently found that retained students are at a higher risk of leaving school earlier, even after controlling for academic performance and other factors such as race and ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, family background, etc."


Via Tina Marie DeLong, Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, October 26, 2014 2:33 PM

Perhaps increased high school drop out rates? Just askin'!-

Lou

Terry Doherty's comment, November 7, 2014 5:29 PM
I have mixed feelings on this ... there ARE times when holding a child back is productive. I've certainly seen it with my nephew. BUT it was caught very early on in his education.
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Brilliant: The Science of How We Get Smarter

Brilliant: The Science of How We Get Smarter | Dyslexia DiaBlogue® | Scoop.it
Most of us assume that intelligence is immutable, set by our genetic inheritance or by our upbringing. Writer and reporter Annie Murphy Paul explodes that myth by revealing the impact of the microenvironment.
This podcast is available for download on iTunes
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5 Ways To Respond To Your Child's Dyslexia Diagnosis

5 Ways To Respond To Your Child's Dyslexia Diagnosis | Dyslexia DiaBlogue® | Scoop.it
By helping your child stay on task, do regular reading practice, and power through even the roughest evenings of work, you are being his best ally....
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Committee examines the science of dyslexia

Committee examines the science of dyslexia | Dyslexia DiaBlogue® | Scoop.it
Yale experts on dyslexia took part in a hearing on Sept. 18 in Washington, D.C. to examine the latest scientific research on the condition, which affects one out of every five people in the United Sta
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Smith on Dyslexia: We Can Turn Disability into Possibility | Committee on Science - U.S. House of Representatives

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