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Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy
Is the Internet changing how we read and think? What are the implications for those with dyslexia? For educators? (Find me on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/cdcowen. See my other SCOOP-IT pages http://www.scoop.it/t/dyslexia-diablogue-ida-examiner AND http://www.scoop.it/t/dyslexia-literacy )
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How to Create Your Own Online Course: 100 Tools, Guides, and Resources | Best Universities

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Cell phones in the classroom: It’s the law

Cell phones in the classroom: It’s the law | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it
Cell phones in the classroom? It's now a state law.
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21st-Century Students Need Books, Not Textbooks

21st-Century Students Need Books, Not Textbooks | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it
Textbooks are expensive, outdated, and stifling to creativity, says a veteran English teacher. And worst of all, they don't promote a love of reading.
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It’s Not a Pipe: Teaching Kids to Read the Media

It’s Not a Pipe: Teaching Kids to Read the Media | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it
The image projected on the screen in the front of the classroom is Magritte's painting of a pipe, including the words, "Ceci n'est pas une pipe." I ask the students to each briefly make a guess why...
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Discover And Create Beautiful Magazine With New Content Curation App Zeen Launched In Beta

Discover And Create Beautiful Magazine With New Content Curation App Zeen Launched In Beta | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it

Excerpted from the article:

"YouTube founders launched a teaser for a new project called Zeen. 

It’s similarly based around the idea of content curation, but whereas Delicious is about tags and bookmarks, Zeen is a more developed version of the ‘social newspaper’ services like Paper.li.

 

After connecting your Twitter, Facebook and Instagram accounts, you get the option to create your first magazine, choosing from a number of template styles and color schemes.

 

You then dive into creating the magazine, without quite so much guidance about what you’re doing or why. Tools along the top of the magazine allow you to add content from the likes of Google searches, YouTube content, Instagram photos, Twitter, RSS feeds (you have to enter the feed URL) – or content you’ve clipped from around the Web using a blookmarklet.

 

Once you’ve added as much content as you like, one piece of content per page, you can publish your magazine to share with others. As yet, it appears that these can’t be viewed by anyone not in the beta...."

 

Read original article here:

http://thenextweb.com/apps/2012/07/27/youtube-founders-new-magazine-focused-web-curation-app-zeen-opens-in-beta/

 

Reserve your username and try out it here: http://zeen.com

 


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Mike Ellsworth's comment, September 27, 2012 12:26 PM
Thanks for the reScoop!
Robin Good's comment, September 27, 2012 12:48 PM
Mike, you are very welcome.

By the way, if I may ask, which is the original scoop that you are referring to with your thanks?
Mike Ellsworth's comment, September 27, 2012 4:06 PM
Robin, good question, as your original scoop has been reScooped several times in this thread. I was thanking RPattinson-Daily for reScooping my reScoop, and so on, down to your original scoop. So thanks for this scoop, and for all the great scooping you do!
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Technology will generate benefits and challenges for schools

Technology will generate benefits and challenges for schools | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it
With 20 percent of American school children attending rural schools, access to computers and high speed Internet at home is becoming a necessity for...
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Rescooped by Carolyn D Cowen from 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience
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How digital culture is rewiring our brains - Sydney Morning Herald

How digital culture is rewiring our brains - Sydney Morning Herald | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it
Sydney Morning HeraldHow digital culture is rewiring our brainsSydney Morning HeraldOur brains are superlatively evolved to adapt to our environment: a process known as neuroplasticity.

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Rescooped by Carolyn D Cowen from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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25 Ways To Use Twitter In The Classroom By Complexity

25 Ways To Use Twitter In The Classroom By Complexity | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it

Recently TeachThought and Edudemic collaborated to produce the following spectrum for using twitter in the classroom.


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The Trouble with On Line Education…mis fire by NY Times op ed | The High-Velocity Edge

The Trouble with On Line Education…mis fire by NY Times op ed | The High-Velocity Edge | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it
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In Uncertain Times, a Publisher Pushes Digital Transformation

In Uncertain Times, a Publisher Pushes Digital Transformation | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it
Company's sobering realization that things were quickly changing in a long-unchanged industry was one shared by many attending a meeting of educational publishers.
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Blogging in the classroom: why your students should write online

Blogging in the classroom: why your students should write online | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it
For the past few months Michael Drennan's GCSE and A level students have been doing all their writing via student blogs.

 

Students realise how high the bar of public domain writing is. This can be initially intimidating, but that removes all apathy or sense of the humdrum. Asking all students to write blogs as learning unfolds and interlinks empowers the teacher to be more supportive because they're less tied to the bureaucracy; it raises challenge levels; it enables IT-skilling; it lets students see their own progress and differentiates well; it means more productive and accelerating learning-talk over rote-writing.

 

Gust MEES: check out also here to get some ideas...

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/06/30/tutankhamun-exhibition-in-cologne-de/

 

 

Read more:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/teacher-network/2012/jul/17/students-should-be-blogging?buffer_share=f6716&CMP=twt_gu

 


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Educators as Curators: 8 Steps to Bringing Your Students the Best of the Web

Educators as Curators: 8 Steps to Bringing Your Students the Best of the Web | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it

Posted on July 23, 2012 by Jennifer Funk

Licensed Under CCSA/ohsarahrose


Last spring, Dr. Corinne Weisgerber turned her undergrads into Guggenheim-like curators. After building personal learning networks that delivered subject-specific tweets and blog posts, her students chose the most salient content and arranged it online the way a museum curator might an art exhibit. Their goal was to design a learning experience that cut through the noise to bring the Internet’s best content to others.

 

The project arose from Weisgerber’s own experience curating content for students, which she and her St. Edward’s University colleague Dr. Shannan Butler shared at the second annual SXSWedu conference in March.

 

Today, they answer questions about why they think the museum curator is the perfect model for today’s educators (and students), and how you can become one too.

 

Read more:

http://edcetera.rafter.com/educators-as-curators-8-steps-to-bringing-your-students-the-best-of-the-web/

 


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5 Things Every Teacher Should Know

5 Things Every Teacher Should Know | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it

In order to be a successful teacher using technology for your 21st century learning encounters, you need to be able to model 21st century learning and innovation skills in your encounters with technology.

 

 

===> These skills are also known as the 4 C’s: <===

 

- Critical thinking and problem solving


- Communication


- Collaboration


- Creativity and innovation


Key basic functions to know: creation capabilities (document, spreadsheet, presentation, WYSIWYG website), collaborative capabilities (document sharing, interactive form building, wiki—collaborative website building). One free (so far) suite to explore for these functions, all under one banner, is GOOGLE. Not just the mainstream search engine, but Google Scholar, Google Alerts, and the entire suite of Google products helps you become more effective and efficient in your search missions, and more. They are constantly adding functions to their suite of tools, so keep up to date by exploring the “More Google Products” page on their site: www.google.com/intl/en/options/. They organize their expanded tool set under the following categories:

 

- Search
- Explore and Innovate
- Communicate, Show and Share
- Go Mobile


Make your computer work better (beta versions of pack software to enhance performance)


Web 2.0 tools have something for everyone and are constantly changing. If you can imagine it, it is most likely out there in one form or another. The trick with web 2.0 tools is, though, that they rarely do everything you are looking for, so sometimes DIY mash-ups are necessary. Understanding the functionality of what you’re looking for helps you to choose the right tools to help you attain it, rather than relying too heavily on a specific set of tools. Focus instead on a class of tools based on functionality.

 

Read more, very interesting...:

http://teachteachtech.coe.uga.edu/index.php/2011/05/02/5-things-every-teacher-should-know/

 


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A connecting educator

A connecting educator | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it
U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan has named August as Connected Educator Month. The U.S.
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Can Technology Replace Teachers?

Can Technology Replace Teachers? | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it
As districts and states look for more efficient ways to operate, they are turning to technological approaches that some see as a threat to teacher jobs.
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What is a 21st century teacher? | SmartBlogs

What is a 21st century teacher? | SmartBlogs | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it
If we want to gain respect as a profession, then we must embrace a 21st century model of constant growth and improvement.
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Solving the Textbook-Common Core Conundrum

Solving the Textbook-Common Core Conundrum | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it
Beverlee Jobrack explains how schools can identify effective teaching materials as they embark on the implementation of the standards.
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Rewards of teaching young children to blog

Rewards of teaching young children to blog | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it
I have been an elementary-school teacher for more than 25 years and I am always on the lookout for meaningful ways to engage and motivate my young students...
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Twitter - A Necessity for Educators in 2012

Twitter - A Necessity for Educators in 2012 | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it

A Necessity for Educators in 2012
“Twitter won’t change your life, but it might make your job more fun and a little easier” - NEA

 

What is Twitter? Twitter is an online social networking site which allows users to send and receive messages of up to 140 characters.

 

Why should I join Twitter? Twitter has really become an extensive online community for anyone to quickly share and gain ideas on any topic. It’s FREE and very easy to use.

 

What role does Twitter have in Education? Twitter is a really great way to communicate short and concise thoughts. Some great ways Twitter can be used in education are:

 

Read more:

http://www.texasprincipal.org/index.php/texas-principals-education-help-support-team/entry/twitter-a-necessity-for-educators-in-2012

 


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Rescooped by Carolyn D Cowen from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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TY @NikPeachey for Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi: Motivating People to Learn

TY @NikPeachey for Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi: Motivating People to Learn | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it

Now, flow is a type of intrinsic motivation, that is, there you do what you're doing primarily because you like what you're doing. If you learn only for external, extrinsic reasons, you will probably forget it as soon as you are no longer forced to remember what you want to do. Nor will you be motivated to learn for its own sake. Whereas if you are intrinsically motivated, you're going to keep learning as you move up and so you are in this lifelong learning mode, which would be the ideal.

3. What kinds of school activities are most (or least) likely to promote flow?
If you think of where kids have most flow in school, it's mostly in extracurricular activities like band, music, athletics, newspaper. In addition, if you look at academic classes, they would report flow especially when they work on team projects. That's the most enjoyable part of school. Next comes working on your own on a project and you can go down and the lowest one [in promoting flow] is listening to a lecture and audio/visual. Anything that involves them, that has goals where they can try to achieve, solve a problem, or do something it's going to be much more likely to produce flow.


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Let's Solve This: ExxonMobil is Proud to Support the Common Core State Standards Initiative

The Common Core State Standards Initiative, which has been adopted in 45 states in the US, ensures internationally recognized best practices are used to prep...
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10 New Ways Twitter Is Changing The College Lecture

10 New Ways Twitter Is Changing The College Lecture | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it

Continuing our theme of using Twitter in education this week, we bring you a look at the ways Twitter is causing the current lecture model to evolve. The following analysis is brought to you by our content partners over at Online Universities.

 

Gone is the time when PowerPoint was the most impressive communication technology in the lecture hall. These days, students and professors enjoy the power of Twitter, a tool that allows for digital discussions to supplement and even guide lecture sessions. So how exactly is Twitter changing the college lecture as we know it?

 

Read on to find out about 10 different ways.

 

- Mobile devices are welcome in the lecture hall once again

- Lectures become a conversation

- Bashful students are speaking up

- More students get connected in large lectures

- Students stay engaged beyond the lecture

- Dorm discussions don’t happen as much anymore, and that’s OK

- There’s more information saved now than ever before

- Students think about lectures even when they’re not at school

- Review sessions happen anywhere

- Fewer classroom disruptions exist

 

Read more:

http://edudemic.com/2012/07/twitter-college-lecture/

 

 


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On the differences between literacies, skills and competencies

On the differences between literacies, skills and competencies | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it
The differences between literacies, skills and competencies shouldn’t merely be glossed over and ignored. These differences are important.

 

Literacies

Literacy is the ability to read and write. Traditionally, this has meant the ability to read and write using paper as the mediating technology. However, we now have many and varied technologies requiring us to ‘read’ and ‘write’ in different ways. As a result we need multiple literacies.

Because literacy depends upon context and particular mediating technologies there is, to my mind, no one literacy to ‘rule them all’. Literacy is a condition, not a threshold.

Skills

A skill is a controlled activity (such as a physical action) that an individual has learned to perform. There are general skills (often called transferable skills) as well as domain-specific skills.

Skills are subject to objective thresholds. So, for example, badges awarded by Scouting organisations signify the reaching of a pre-determined level of skill in a particular field.

Competencies

A competence is a collection of skills for a pre-defined purpose. Often the individual with the bundle of skills being observed or assessed has not defined the criteria by which he or she is deemed to be ‘competent’.

Competencies have the semblance of objectivity but are dependent upon subjective judgements by another human being (or beings) who observe knowledge, skills and behaviours.

 

Read more,

http://dougbelshaw.com/blog/2012/07/12/on-the-important-differences-between-literacies-skills-and-competencies/#.UAKMPo5aRjs

 


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Read Every Day. Lead a Better Life. | THE READING BILL OF RIGHTS

Read Every Day. Lead a Better Life. is a global literacy campaign launched as part of Scholastic's 90th anniversary celebration that underscores the importance of reading to better prepare children who will need strong literacy skills to survive...
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Education with cup holders

Education with cup holders | Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy | Scoop.it
The subject of what is and isn’t working in education is once again on the front pages of our state’s newspapers.

Regardless of your political leanings, evaluation of teachers and their unions, or opinions about what the right “fix” may be for education, it is easy to agree that our current system of education was created in reaction to a mass industrialization of this country that began well over a hundred years ago in the U.S. Take a second and Google “The Committee of Ten.” This group of ten educators came together in the late 1800s to provide recommendations to the nation in regard to the mass standardization of American education. The eight-year elementary school, four-year high school, agrarian-based school calendar, standard school subject areas and social promotion all are directly or indirectly based on this panel’s work. For the most part, what we do in all levels of education, how we organize and administrate schools and how we move students from one level to another has barely changed since 1892. Since that time, almost every educational reform movement, almost every seminal stride made in educational philosophy and practice and almost every piece of reform legislation has been superimposed, wedged into or relegated to the periphery of the Committee of Ten structure.

Mind-boggling, isn’t it? If the auto industry followed the same progress, we would still be cranking our cars in the morning before our daily commute. While many of the crank car drivers are dedicated, intelligent and caring drivers, and while the crank car may well be successful in getting us from point A to B, we know that today’s car consumers expect and need more. We have an education system without cup holders.

In their recent book “Inevitable: Mass Customized Learning,” authors Schwahn and McGarvey describe an educational system that is a bastion of the Industrial Age. The authors argue that with all the amazing educational research and data currently available, all the technological advances that allow content to be delivered efficiently and all we know about who learners are and how they learn, “it is now possible to meet the needs of each learner. Let’s stop tinkering with the current Industrial Age delivery system … (and) leapfrog to the Information Age and beyond.”


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