Dynamic Inequity Infographics
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Dynamic Inequity Infographics
A visual dipiction of some of America's disparities
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10 of the Best Sources for Infographic Inspiration

10 of the Best Sources for Infographic Inspiration | Dynamic Inequity Infographics | Scoop.it
Information graphics or “infographics” are graphic visual representations of information, data, or knowledge.

Infographics help us absorb facts and figures in the most effective way possible. They come in extremely handy when you need to explain complex information, numbers or data rather quickly and effectively. One cool way to get inspired is to look at some of the best infographics out there.

Infographics are an excellent way to add humor or irreverence to tell a great story in short possible way. However, infographics can be pretty hard to design since you have to gather together a lot of information and make it look good. Today we're to sharing the top places to see some great visual graphics and also find inspiration to create your own...


Via Lauren Moss
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iPhone App Reveals Tons Of Eye-Popping Facts About What People Eat

iPhone App Reveals Tons Of Eye-Popping Facts About What People Eat | Dynamic Inequity Infographics | Scoop.it

Last week we told you that New Yorkers drink nearly seven times more coffee than other city folks. The finding comes from Massive Health using data collected by an iPhone app called The Eatery.
The app lets users snap a picture of their food, label it (i.e "apple" or "cheeseburger") and then give it a health rating. Other users then give their own rating of your dish (which is especially important if you're not the honest type).


Via Alex Butler
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Functional Art: Infographics as moral acts

Functional Art: Infographics as moral acts | Dynamic Inequity Infographics | Scoop.it
Edward Tufte is —among many other good things— the Oscar Wilde of information graphics and visualization: He tends to write in aphorisms and epigrams, so he is a very quotable essayist. Here's a paragraph of his that I hold dear:

"Making an evidence presentation is a moral act as well as an intellectual activity. To maintain standards of quality, relevance, and integrity for evidence, consumers of presentations should insist that presenters be held intellectually and ethically responsible for what they show and tell. Thus consuming a presentation is also an intellectual and moral activity."

 

That paragraph speaks to the three persons that coexist in me: The journalist, the educator, and the information designer. Its main theme is central in The Functional Art: Correctly presenting data and phenomena in a graphic is not just a professional endeavor; it is also —above all— an ethical mandate. So is openly and candidly discuss mistakes, yours and others'. In infographics and visualization, the decisions we make on how to encode information, how to organize it, and how to present it, should be guided by a simple principle: Whatever improves citizens' interest in a relevant topic and their understanding of it is morally and ethically* good; whatever obscures the subject, trivializes it, or misleads audiences is bad...


Via Lauren Moss
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