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Rescooped by Dylan Fabre from OHS in the field of Medicine and Pre-hospital care
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Health and Safety information for Ambulance officer and paramedic - Workplace Health and Safety Queensland


Via Aaron Abbott
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Aaron Abbott's curator insight, March 2, 2014 2:10 AM

An interesting site composed of health and safety information for paramedics, that also lists the statistics across the field with regards to injuries, and links for managing the risks associated with the role.

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Paramedic safety in the spotlight

Paramedic safety in the spotlight | dylan fabre ochs | Scoop.it
IN HIS 14 years as a paramedic, Matthew Eastham has seen several of his colleagues physical and verbally assaulted.

Via Nat Shepherd
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Nat Shepherd's curator insight, March 10, 2014 3:01 AM

The need for paramedics to have greater protection from both physical and verbal abuse is obvious. Dealing with emotive situations as well as having to deal with intoxicated people is an environment wrought with peril. 

Mia McGeough's curator insight, March 10, 2014 6:25 PM

This article refers to the verbal and physical assault and hinderances often experienced by paramedics. It states that although people intend to help, often they impede paramedics from performing their job in assisting injured/sick persons. Notably, the article mentions a proposition for tougher penalties for people who assault paramedics of up to 3 months in gaol or $13 000 fine. I wonder how effective this will be at deterring people. I do not believe that people under the influence of alcohol or drugs are not responsible or accountable for their actions. In fact I believe just the opposite that all people are accountable for their actions, regardless of whether they are under the influence or not. However, scenes where paramedics are required are often emotionally charged and people under the influence can be difficult to manage and sometimes may not be consciously aware of what is happening or what they are doing. Which is why I question how effective such penalties will be at deterring people from assaulting paramedics.

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VIDEO: 'The paramedics put safety first'

VIDEO: 'The paramedics put safety first' | dylan fabre ochs | Scoop.it
Barbara Hakin, deputy chief executive of NHS England, has said it is "sometimes in the best interest of patients' safety that they remain in the ambulance after they have arrived at hospital".

Via Health and Social Care Coursework
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Rescooped by Dylan Fabre from Give your hand to serve and heart to love: OHS CQUniversity, Quest 1
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occupational health and safety and paramedics - Google Search

occupational health and safety and paramedics - Google Search | dylan fabre ochs | Scoop.it

http://www.deir.qld.gov.au/workplace/landing/landing.htm?occupation=Ambulance+officer+and+paramedic#.UxaIgfmSwbg

 


Via Skye Krobath
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Skye Krobath's curator insight, March 4, 2014 9:12 PM

Occupational health and safety has given me the opportunity to open my eyes and look at a scenario in a completely different aspect. Hazards that I didn't notice before are now more clear.  This has given me the knowledge of how to go about a certain situation and the ability to provide a safe outcome. It is important for the Queensland Government to provide employees with the correct Occupational Health and Safety laws in order to provide them with a safe work environment. 

Rescooped by Dylan Fabre from Rebecca's Quest for Safety and Wellness at Work
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Paramedic refused to carry dying girl over safety fears - Telegraph

Paramedic refused to carry dying girl over safety fears - Telegraph | dylan fabre ochs | Scoop.it
Shannon Powell, a paramedic, refused to carry a dying 14-year-old girl from a cross-country race course because of health and safety fears for herself, a coroner heard.

Via Rebecca Jones
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Rebecca Jones's curator insight, March 3, 2014 7:58 PM

Article 3.

Alike article 1, paramedics have a duty of care to themselves and others which begins with ensuring their own health and safety. This article is quite vague as it details the series of events only via a collection of frantic witness accounts. The article does not describe the cross country terrain well but it would seem once they had her on the stretcher, they were right to go slow and steady, rather than fast and frantic and risk further injury to the patient.. It is unclear at what point the paramedic was expected to carry the patient without the stretcher. In addition, it does not detail the size and weight of the paramedic or the patient, or if the paramedic had sustained a previous back injury. Again though, a paramedic should be protected by OHS in line with those of other industries. If her back were damaged in a workplace incident, one would hope this had been properly addressed and procedure to prevent such an injury occurring again updated. At the end of the day, this was a very unfortunate series of events that lead to the death of a little girl. At the end of the day though, no paramedic takes a high risk, high stress, comparatively low paid job because they don't want to help patients.  

Sharon Mcdonald's curator insight, March 5, 2014 12:42 AM

A good example where Occupational Health and Safety fears have caused Paramedics to make a non life saving decision. Paramedics feared that their own health and safety in this situation was at risk and led to them to make a decision not  to render assistance to the injured 14 year old girl. This caused a large amount of controversy and opened up to a whole heap of questions as to whether these Paramedics made the correct and justifiable decision.

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Paramedic Care I Workforce safety and Wellness

Delmar: Foundations of Paramedic Care Vol 1 ch 3.


Via Becky Nott (Humanity OHS)
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Keeping safe over the festive season- A message for our paramedics

A message from A/Chief Executive Mike Willis about the need for paramedics to be mindful of their safety over the busy festive season.

Via Lauren Swift
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Paige Moodie's curator insight, March 6, 2014 6:41 AM

I feel that it's great to see a powerful member of the NSW Ambulance Service stepping forward to highlight the increasing assault level on Paramedics during the festive season. Drug and alcohol abuse, particularly psycho-stimulants, are becoming more and more commonly seen and treated within the pre hospital emergency setting (Commonwealth of Australia, 2006). Agitation, aggression and violence (both verbal and physical) are quite common side affects displayed as a result of their ingestion (Commonwealth of Australia, 2006). Due to the fact that Paramedics are often responding to these patients in this type of environment, it isn't hard to understand why assaults on Paramedics can be common occurrences. Mr Willis is absolutely correct in stating that we should all look out for one another, because early detection of a hostile situation can be the best preventative in my opinion. If we can recognise the signs of risk and danger early, this may lower the amount of assaults. If the treating paramedic/s are injured, this then creates more patients and less effective health care for those in need. Lets hope that the tougher penalty on individuals being violent towards paramedics can also help to lower these incidences!

Lauren Swift's curator insight, April 28, 2014 11:34 PM

This article explains the increase in violence towards paramedics and to each other, especially over the christmas season as there is usually more alcohol consumed in this festive season. And that violence can be physical and verbal. 

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Paramedics refused to save dying man because of 'health and safety'

Paramedics refused to save dying man because of 'health and safety' | dylan fabre ochs | Scoop.it
MEDICS stood by and watched as Michael Thornton, 30, tragically lost his fight for life

Via David Simpson
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Ambulance waits ;The paramedics put patient safety first

Barbara Hakin, deputy chief executive of NHS England, has said it is "sometimes in the best interest of patients' safety that they remain in the ambulance af...

Via Lauren Swift
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Lauren Swift's curator insight, April 28, 2014 10:52 PM

This article is about the back log of patients waiting in ambulances and in hospitals to get a bed in the Emergency ward. They discuss that if there are more ambulances waiting in line at hospital there are less out on road ready for the next emergency, which is very true. The patients who are critically ill are attended to first. The amount of beds available in the emergency ward of the hospital also depends on the availability of beds in the wards as most patients are transferred to other wards in the hospital for further investigation and other patients in emergency are good enough to be sent home the next day or the same day etc.